St. Robert of Molesme

Born about the year 1029, at Champagne, France, of noble parents who bore the names of Thierry and Ermengarde; died at Molesme, 17 April, 1111.

Statue of St Robert of Molesme in GermanyWhen fifteen years of age, he commenced his novitiate in the Abbey of Montier-la-Celle, or St. Pierre-la-Celle, situated near Troyes, of which he became later prior. In 1068 he succeeded Hunaut II as Abbot of St. Michael…

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Saint Hugh the Great

Abbot of Cluny, born at Semur (Brionnais in the Diocese of Autun), 1024; died at Cluny, 28 April, 1109.

His early life

The eldest son of Count Dalmatius of Semur and Aremberge (Aremburgis) of Vergy, Hugh was descended from the noblest families in Burgundy. Dalmatius, devoted to war and the chase, desired that Hugh should adopt the knightly calling and succeed to the ancestral estates; his mother…

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Pope Saint Pius V

St. Pope Pius V, photographed at the Musee des Arts DecoratifsBorn at Bosco, near Alexandria, Lombardy, 17 Jan., 1504 elected 7 Jan., 1566; died 1 May, 1572. Being of a poor though noble family his lot would have been to follow a trade, but he was taken in by the Dominicans of Voghera, where he received a good education and was trained in the way of solid and austere piety. He entered the order, was ordained in 1528, and…

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According to The Telegraph:

Before the King’s Troop arrived in Hyde Park, the Band of the Royal Artillery played a selection of celebratory music close to the firing position, as crowds gathered to watch the annual display.

An hour later, the Honourable Artillery Company began firing a 62-gun royal salute from the riverbank at the Tower of London… Three L118 Ceremonial Light Guns, similar to those used operationally in recent years in Afghanistan, were used…

The Queen has two birthdays – her actual one on April 21 and her official one in June, which is celebrated with the Trooping the Colour parade.

To read the entire article in The Telegraph, please click here.

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According to RoyalBlog.nl:

Denmark celebrated Queen Margrethe’s 75th birthday in grand style. After the splendour of the Gala Dinner Wednesday evening, there were the more public festivities on her actual birthday, Thursday. At noon thousands had congregated at the main square of the Amalienborg Palace complex, where the queen and her family made no less than 3 appearances on the balcony to acknowledge the cheering and waving of the crowd.

Afterwards the Queen underook a carriage tour, across the city centre to the Town Hall, where she was offered a reception and luncheon.

To read the entire article on RoyalBlog.nl, please click here.

 

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Saint Margaret of Scotland The historian of St. Margaret of Scotland, who had the happiness of residing in her Court for many years, has written down some of the simple instructions she daily gave her children as they stood around her or sat by her side. They are her own words, and he says he himself was often present, and heard them.

“My beloved children, fear the Lord, for they that fear Him shall never want all kind of good things. Love God, for if you love Him He will give you prosperity in this life, and eternal happiness with His Saints in that which is to come.”

St Margaret of Scotland and her children.

St Margaret of Scotland and her children.

Then, when the hour for the Holy Mass came, she would lead them into the church, and kneel in the midst of them before the altar, as if she saw God visibly present; and they, too, like her, bent them selves down with reverent humility till Mass was ended. One of those who sometimes had the privilege of being present on these occasions, and who had seen the devotion and reverent piety of the Queen and her children, used to say: “If you desire to know how the angels of God in Heaven pray, go to the church and look at the queen and her children, praying during the offering up of the Holy Mass.”

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The Catechism In Examples Vol. III By the Rev. D. Chisholm Pg. 156-157.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 471

 

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We may ask ourselves why it is that God, sufficient unto Himself, wanted to create the immense quantity of beings that comprise the universe.

Since He is infinitely perfect, He did not need to create them and, as nothing obliged Him not to create the cosmos, so also nothing obliged Him to do so.

God

In His infinite goodness and wisdom, God wanted it thus and, as if from a rushing torrent, He produced an innumerable quantity of beings.

In addition to having all perfections, God Our Lord sees in Himself every degree of perfection possible. In creating such a great number of beings, He wanted that these beings not only reflect His perfection, but that they do so by the most varied degrees.

One may consider the Catholic Cause as that ideal that aims to make Creation, considered in its entirety and not in just one or another of its aspects, give glory to God.

We are dealing with making the ensemble of families, cities, nations, mankind and, in ultimate analysis, the entire Universe, give glory to God.

Gothic Cathedral on a rock by the sea. Painting by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

Gothic Cathedral on a rock by the sea. Painting by Karl Friedrich Schinkel.

According to Scholasticism, beauty consists of unity in variety. We consider an object beautiful when its various elements form an entirety.

Fragmented beings, lacking unity, possess neither beauty nor a capacity of attraction. By means of its diverse and varied elements, it is unity that gives beauty and value to beings.

The principle of unity in variety has its laws, which comprise what we call the Esthetics of the Universe.

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O Universo é uma Catedral: Excertos do pensamento de Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira recolhidos por Leo Daniele, Edições Brasil de Amanhã, São Paulo, 1997

[Nobility.org Translation]

 

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Mother Mary Euphrasia Pelletier, foundress of the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd and canonized May 2, 1940 by Pope Pius XII.

Rose Virginie Pelletier before joining the Order.The aim of this institute is to provide a shelter for girls and women of dissolute habits, who wish to do penance for their iniquities and to lead a truly christian life. Not only voluntary penitents but also those consigned by civil or parental authority are admitted. Many of these penitents desire to…

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St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen

Born in 1577, at Sigmaringen, Prussia, of which town his father Johannes Rey was burgomaster; died at Sevis, 24 April, 1622.

St. FidelisOn the paternal side he was of Flemish ancestry. He pursued his studies at the University of Freiburg in the Breisgau, and in 1604 became tutor to Wilhelm von Stotzingen, with whom he travelled in France and Italy…

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April 25 – Builder

April 23, 2015

Blessed Meinwerk

Tenth Bishop of Paderborn, d. 1036: Meinwerk (Meginwerk) was born of the noble family of the Immedinger and related to the royal house of Saxony.

Bl. Meinwerk, photo by Dirk D.His father was Imad (Immeth), Count of Teisterbant and Radichen, and his mother’s name was Adela (Adala, Athela). In early youth he was dedicated by his parents to serve God in the priesthood. He began his…

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Our Lady of Good Counsel

January of 1467 saw the death of the last great Albanian leader, George Castriota, better known as Scanderbeg. Raised by an Albanian chief, he placed himself at the head of his own people.

Subsequently, Scanderbeg inflicted stunning defeats on the Turkish army and occupied fortresses all over Albania…

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St. Rafael Arnáiz Barón

(9 April 1911, Burgos, Spain – 26 April 1938, Dueñas, Palencia, Spain)

St. Rafael Arnáiz BarónRafael Arnáiz, known in the monastery as Brother María Rafael, was born on 9 April 1911 in the city of Burgos, in north-central Spain. He was the first of four sons born to a well-to-do, deeply Christian and Catholic family…

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Pope St. Cletus

Pope St. AnacletusThis name is only another form for Anacletus, the second successor of St. Peter. It is true that the Liberian Catalogue, a fourth-century list of popes, so called because it ends with Pope Liberius (d. 366), contains both names, as if they were different persons. But this is an error, owing evidently to the existence of two forms of the same name, one an abbreviation of the other. In the aforesaid catalogue the papal succession is: Petrus, Linus, Clemens, Cletus, Anacletus. This catalogue, however, is the only authority previous to the sixth century (Liber Pontificalis) for distinguishing two popes under the names of Cletus and Anacletus.

The “Carmen adv. Marcionem” is of the latter half of the fourth century, and its papal list probably depends on the Liberian Catalogue. The “Martyrologium Hieronymianum” (q. v.) mentions both “Aninclitus” and “Clitus” (23 and 31 December), but on each occasion these names are found in a list of popes; hence the days mentioned cannot be looked on as specially consecrated to these two persons. Apart from these lists, all other ancient papal lists, from the second to the fourth century, give as follows the immediate succession of St. Peter: Linos, Anegkletos, Klemes (Linus, Anencletus, Clemens), and this succession is certainly the right one. It is that found in St. Irenæus and in the chronicles of the second and third centuries. Both Africa and the Orient adhered faithfully to this list, which is also given in the very ancient Roman Canon of the Mass, except that in the latter Cletus is the form used, and the same occurs in St. Epiphanius, St. Jerome, Rufinus, and in many fifth- and sixth-century lists. This second successor of St. Peter governed the Roman Church from about 76 to about 88. The “Liber Pontificalis” says that his father was Emelianus and that Cletus was a Roman by birth, and belonged to the quarter known as the Vicus Patrici. It also tells us that he ordained twenty-five priests, and was buried in Vaticano near the body of St. Peter.

Pope St. AnacletusThere is historical evidence for only the last of these statements. The feast of St. Cletus falls, with that of St. Marcellinus, on 26 April; this date is already assigned to it in the first edition of the “Liber Pontificalis”. (See CLEMENT I, SAINT, POPE.)

LIGHTFOOT, Apostolic Fathers, Pt. I: St. Clement of Rome (2nd ed., London, 1890), 201-345; DUCHESNE, Liber Pontificalis, I, LXIX-LXX, 2-3, 52-53; HARNACK, Gesch. der alt-christl. Lit. bis Eusebius, II-I, 144-202; Acta SS., April, III, 409-11; DE SMEDT, Dissertationes selectæ in hist. eccles. (Ghent, 1876), 300-04.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Peter Armengol was born in Guárdia dels Prats, a small village in the archdiocese of Tarragon, Spain in 1238. He belonged to the house of the barons of Rocafort, descendants of the counts of Urgel, whose ancestors were directly linked to the counts of Barcelona and the monarchs of Aragon and Castile.

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St. Anselm

St. AnselmArchbishop of Canterbury, Doctor of the Church; born at Aosta a Burgundian town on the confines of Lombardy, died 21 April, 1109.

Subscription11 His father, Gundulf, was a Lombard who had become a citizen of Aosta, and his mother, Ermenberga, came of an old Burgundian family. Like many other saints, Anselm learnt the first lessons of piety…

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St. Leonidas

(Or LEONIDES.)

The Roman Martyrology records several feast days of martyrs of this name in different countries. Under date of 28 January there is a martyr called Leonides, a native of the Thebaid, whose death with several companions is supposed to have occurred during the Diocletian persecution (Acta SS., January, II, 832). Another Leonides appears on 2 September, in a long list of martyrs headed by a St. Diomedes. Together with a St. Eleutherius, a Leonides is honoured on 8 August. From other sources we know of a St. Leonidas, Bishop of Athens, who lived about the sixth century, and whose feast is celebrated on 15 April (“Acta SS.”, April, II, 378; “Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca”, 2nd ed., 137). Still another martyr of the name is honoured on 16 April, with Callistus, Charysius, and other companions (Acta SS., April, II, 402).

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

Origen Adamantius, the son of St. Leonides of Alexandria.

The best known of them all, however, is St. Leonides of Alexandria, father of the great Origen. From Eusebius (Hist. Eccles., VI, 1, 2) we learn that he died a martyr during the persecution under Septimius Severus in 202. He was condemned to death by the prefect of Egypt, Lactus, and beheaded. His property was confiscated. Leonides carefully cultivated the brilliant intellect of his son Origen from the latter’s childhood, and imparted to him the knowledge of Holy Scripture. The feast of St. Leonidas of Alexandria is celebrated on 22 April.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Pedralvarez Cabral

(Pedro Alvarez.)

Lithograph of Pedro Álvares Cabral

Lithograph of Pedro Álvares Cabral

A celebrated Portugese navigator, generally called the discoverer of Brazil, born probably around 1460; date of death uncertain. Very little is known concerning the life of Cabral. He was the third son of Fernao Cabral, Governor of Beira and Belmonte, and Isabel de Gouvea, and married Isabel de Castro, the daughter of the distinguished Fernando de Noronha. He must have had an exellent training ini navigation and large experience as a seaman, for King Emmanuel of Portugal considered him competent to continue the work of Vasco da Gama, and in the year 1500 placed him in command of a fleet which was to set sail for India. His commision was to establish permanent commercial relations and to introduce Christianity wherever he went, using force of arms when necessary to gain his point. The nature of the undertaking led rich Florentine merchants to contribute to the equipment of the ships, and priests to join the expedition. Among the captains of the fleet, which consisted of thirteen ships with 1,200 men, were Bartolomeu Diaz, Pero Vaz de Caminha, and Nicolao Coelho, the latter the companion of da Gama. Da Gama himself gave the directions necessary for the course of the voyage.

Pedro Álvares Cabral sees the land that would later be known as Brazil for the first time. Painting by Aurélio de Figueiredo.

Pedro Álvares Cabral sees the land that would later be known as Brazil for the first time. Painting by Aurélio de Figueiredo.

The fleet left Lisbon, 9 March, 1500, and following the course laid down, sought to avoid the calms of the coast of Guinea. On leaving the Cape Verde Islands, where Luis Pirez was forced by a storm to return to Lisbon, they sailed in a decidedly southwesterly direction. On 22 April a mountain was visible, to which the name of “Mt. Paschoal” was given; on the 23rd Coelho landed on the coast of Brazil, and on the 25th the entire fleet sailed into the harbor called “Porto Seguro”. Cabral perceived that the new country lay east of the line of demarcation made by Alexander VI, and at once sent Andreas Gonçalvez (according to other authorities Gaspar de Lemos) to Portugal with the important tidings. Believing the island to be an island he gave it the name of “Island of Vera Cruz” and took possession of it by erecting a cross and holding a religious service. The service was celebrated by the Franciscan, Father Henrique, afterwards Bishop of Ceuta, on the island called Coroa Vermelha in the bay of Cabralia. Cabral resumed his voyage 3 May; by the end of the month the fleet approached the Cape of Good Hope, where it was struck by a storm in which four vessels, including that of Bartolomeu Diaz, were lost. With the ships now reduced to one-half of the original number, Cabral reached Sofala, 16 July, and Mozambique, 20 July; in the latter place he received a cordial greeting.

Twelve of 13 ships that were part of Cabral's fleet are depicted. Many were lost, as can be seen in this drawing from Memória das Armadas, c.1568

Twelve of 13 ships that were part of Cabral’s fleet are depicted. Many were lost, as can be seen in this drawing from Memória das Armadas, c.1568

On 26 July he came to Kilwa where he was unable to make an agreement with the ruler; on 2 August he reached Melinde; here he had a friendly welcome and obtained a pilot to take him to India. At Calicut, where he arrived 13 September, he met with many obstacles, so that he was obliged to bombard the town for two days; in Cochin and Kananur, however, he succeeded in making advantageous treaties. Cabral started on the return voyage, 16 January, 1501, and arrived at Lisbon, 31 July, or, as is sometiimes given, 23 June. On the way home he met Pero Diaz whom he had dispatched, during his voyage, to Magadoxo, and in September the last of his ships, in command of Sancho de Toar whom he had sent to Sofala, returned to Lisbon. Of his later life nothing is known.

Tomb of Pedro Álvares Cabral in the Church of Our Lady of Grace, Santarém, Portugal.

Tomb of Pedro Álvares Cabral in the Church of Our Lady of Grace, Santarém, Portugal.

The authorities for the voyage of discovery of Cabral are contained in the reports of eyewitnesses, especially in the letter of VAZ DE CAMINHA to King Emmanuel, of which the original was discovered in 1790. This letter was first published by CAZAL in his Corografía brazilica (1817), I, 12-34; the best edition is in the Revista do Instituto Historico Geographico do Brasil (Rio de Janeiro, 1877), XL, Pt. II, 12-37. Another narrative is that of a pilot, published by RAMUSIO in his Delle Navig. e Viaggi (Venice, 1563), I, 1221-127. There is also a description of the voyage in BARROS, Asia (Lisbon, 1552), Dec. I, lib. V, i-x; in FARIO Y SOUSA, Asia Port., I, 1, v, 45-49, and in the writings of other historians. VARNHAGEN, Historia geral do Brazil (Rio de Janeiro, 1854), I; Materials for a Biography in Revista do Instituto Histor. Geog. do Brasil (1843), V, 496-98; BALDAQUE DA SILVA, O Descobrimento do Brazil por Pedro Alvarez Cabral (Lisbon, 1892).

OTTO HARTIG (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. George

Statue of St. George inside the City Hall, "Saló de Cent", Barcelona.

Martyr, patron of England, suffered at or near Lydda, also known as Diospolis, in Palestine, probably before the time of Constantine. According to the very careful investigation of the whole question recently instituted by Father Delehaye, the Bollandist, in the light of modern sources of…

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St. Adalbert of Bohemia

Born 939 of a noble Bohemian family; died 997.

Statue of St. Adalbert of Prague. Part of Wenceslas Monument on the Wenceslas Square in Prague. National Museum in the background.

He assumed the name of the Archbishop Adalbert (his name had been Wojtech), under whom he studied at Magdeburg. He became Bishop of Prague, whence he was obliged to flee on account of the enmity…

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King St. Louis IX of France holding the Crown of Thorns. Statue outside Basilique du Sacré-Coeur in Paris.

King St. Louis IX of France holding the Crown of Thorns. Statue is outside Basilique du Sacré-Coeur in Paris.

St. Louis, King of France, was one of the gentlest and most pious of monarchs. One thing only did he punish with great severity, and this was disrespect to, and profanation of, the Holy Name of God.

At that time, as in our own days, nothing was more dishonored than God’s holy Name. To put an end to this great evil, as far as lay in his power, he formulated a law for the punishment of all who were found guilty of this great sin. Then, having assembled all the members of the great Court in one of the largest apartments of the palace, the doors of which he caused to remain open, he read in a loud voice the terms of the decree; after which he pronounced an eloquent discourse, setting forth the enormity of the crime, and his determination to punish without mercy all who would willfully be guilty of it.

St. Louis_IXMost of those who came to the knowledge of the new law carefully refrained from every form of blasphemy or word of disrespect to the Name of God; but there were some who, trusting to the well-known clemency of the King, placed no restraint upon their tongues. Among these was one who occupied a high position in the city of Paris. The King, hearing of this, summoned the offender to his presence, and having in words inspired by his zeal for the honor of God showed him the malignity of the sin, ordered his tongue, the member through which it had been committed, to be pierced with a red-hot iron.

Many of the inhabitants showed great indignation at this action of the King, and did not hesitate to shower upon him the heaviest maledictions.

Painting of St. Louis by Georges Rouget

Painting of St. Louis by Georges Rouget

He was in a short time informed of their conduct towards him; but he would not consent to their receiving any punishment, saying that from his heart he pardoned them, because the words they uttered were not against God, but only against himself.

Afterwards, referring to this matter, he said: “Would to God that my tongue should be pierced with a hot iron, if only by suffering this I might be able to root out of my kingdom every word of blasphemy or dishonor against God s most holy Name!” And when someone praised him for his zeal, he answered: “I prefer to hear the maledictions that are poured forth against me when I cause to be executed the law I have passed, than to hear the words of praise you are lavishing upon me.”

 

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The Catechism In Examples Vol. III By the Rev. D. Chisholm Pg. 112-114.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 470

 

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King of Norway commemorates those who died fighting invasion 75 years ago

April 16, 2015

According to the Royal Forums: The King of Norway today was present for a ceremony at the National Monument at the Akerhus Fortress marking the 75th anniversary of the German invasion of Norway. King Harald laid a wreath at the monument to those who gave their lives fighting for their country, before saluting and observing […]

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Queen of Denmark denies abdication

April 16, 2015

According to Hello Magazine: Margrethe, who became queen the day after her father King Frederick IX died in 1972, replied “absolutely not” when asked whether she would step down. The Danish population and members of the royal family have already been celebrating the queen’s birthday ahead of her milestone event on Thursday. A street parade […]

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Queen Elizabeth thanks Tyburn Nuns for their prayers

April 16, 2015

According to the Catholic Herald: A priest who was invited to a reception at Buckingham Palace has said the Queen asked him to convey her thanks to the Tyburn Nuns after learning that they prayed for her. The Queen “showed great interest”, he said, and asked him to “convey her thanks to the nuns for […]

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Sidesaddle riding making a comeback

April 16, 2015

According to The Washington Post: Sidesaddle riding is making an unlikely comeback in the United States, greeted by many nostalgic equestrians as a delightful revival of a long-lost skill celebrating feminine modesty and elegance. “I think there’s a real craving for glamour and the sense of tradition, kind of a return to elegance and a […]

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Second Horizon

April 16, 2015

Compare the coldness of lines and substance [of modern architecture] – there is nothing “colder” than cement – to the recollection, the warmth, and the harmony of these old houses in Warwick. They all seem to consider the passerby with a smile impregnated with familiar kindness, and to contain in themselves the warmth of domestic […]

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April 17 – He rescued his country from crushing debt, yet waged incessant war

April 16, 2015

Maximilian I Duke of Bavaria, 1598-1622, Elector of Bavaria and Lord High Steward of the Holy Roman Empire, 1623-1651; born at Munich, 17 April, 1573; died at Ingolstadt, 27 September, 1651. The lasting services he rendered his country and the Catholic Church justly entitle him to the surname of “Great”. He was the son of […]

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April 17 – One of the many nobles who spread the Cluny reform

April 16, 2015

St. Robert Founder of the Abbey of Chaise-Dieu in Auvergne, born at Aurilac, Auvergne, about 1000; died in Auvergne, 1067. On his father’s side he belonged to the family of the Counts of Aurilac, who had given birth to St. Géraud. He studied at Brioude near the basilica of St-Julien, in a school open to […]

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April 17 – St. Stephen Harding

April 16, 2015

St. Stephen Harding Confessor, the third Abbot of Cîteaux, was born at Sherborne in Dorsetshire, England, about the middle of the eleventh century; died 28 March, 1134. He received his early education in the monastery of Sherborne and afterwards studied in Paris and Rome. On returning from the latter city he stopped at the monastery […]

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April 18 – Blessed Marie de l’Incarnation

April 16, 2015

Bl. Marie de l’Incarnation Known also as Madame Acarie, foundress of the French Carmel, born in Paris, 1 February, 1566; died at Pontoise, April, 1618. By her family Barbara Avrillot belonged to the higher bourgeois society in Paris. Her father, Nicholas Avrillot was accountant general in the Chamber of Paris, and chancellor of Marguerite of […]

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April 18 – St. Willigis

April 16, 2015

St. Willigis Archbishop of Mainz, d. 23 Feb., 1011. Feast, 23 February or 18 April. Though of humble birth he received a good education, and through the influence of Bishop Volkold of Meissen entered the service of Otto I, and after 971 figured as chancellor of Germany. Otto II in 975 made him Archbishop of […]

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April 19 – Captured by pirates

April 16, 2015

St. Alphege (or Elphege), Saint, born 954; died 1012; also called Godwine, martyred Archbishop of Canterbury, left his widowed mother and patrimony for the monastery of Deerhurst (Gloucestershire). After some years as an anchorite at Bath, he there became abbot, and (19 Oct., 984) was made Bishop of Winchester. In 994 Elphege administered confirmation to […]

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April 19 – The saintly warrior pope

April 16, 2015

Pope St. Leo IX Pope St. Leo IX earnestly spread the Cluny reform Born at Egisheim, near Colmar, on the borders of Alsace, 21 June, 1002, Pope St. Leo IX died on 19 April, 1054. He belonged to a noble family which had given or was to give saints to the Church and rulers to […]

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April 19 – Blessed Conrad of Ascoli

April 16, 2015

Friar Minor and missionary, born at Ascoli in the March of Ancona in 1234; died there, 19 April, 1289. He belonged to the noble family of Milliano and from his earliest years made penance the predominating element of his life… Read more here.

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April 20 – Blessed John Finch

April 16, 2015

Bl. John Finch A martyr, b. about 1548; d. 20 April, 1584. He was a yeoman of Eccleston, Lancashire, and a member of a well-known old Catholic family, but he appears to have been brought up in schism. When he was twenty years old he went to London where he spent nearly a year with […]

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April 20 – “I beg your Lordship…that my lips and…fingers may be cut off…”

April 16, 2015

Blessed Fr. James Bell Priest and martyr, b. at Warrington in Lancashire, England, probably about 1520; d. 20 April, 1584. For the little known of him we depend on the account published four years after his death by Bridgewater in his “Concertatio” (1588), and derived from a manuscript which was kept at Douay when Challoner […]

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April 20 – Blessed Richard Sergeant

April 16, 2015

Bl. Richard Sergeant English martyr, executed at Tyburn, 20 April, 1586. He was probably a younger son of Thomas Sergeant of Stone, Gloucestershire, by Katherine, daughter of John Tyre of Hardwick. He took his degree at Oxford (20 Feb., 1570-1), and arrived at the English College, Reims, on 25 July, 1581. He was ordained subdeacon […]

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April 14 – She suffered for the moral corruption and decay of her time

April 13, 2015

Saint Lydwine In 1380, Saint Lydwine was born in the small town of Schiedam in Holland. Her father was a wealthy noble named Peter, and her mother was from a poor family who worked their own farm. Her father’s family lost their fortune, and the whole family was reduced to poverty. At that time, all […]

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April 14 – St. Peter Gonzalez (aka St. Elmo)

April 13, 2015

St. Peter Gonzalez Popularly known as St. Elmo, b. in 1190 at Astorga, Spain; d. 15 April, 1246, at Tuy. He was educated by his uncle, Bishop of Astorga, who gave him when very young a canonry. Later he entered the Dominican Order and became a renowned preacher; crowds gathered to hear him and numberless… […]

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April 15 – Her church ranks third in Rome

April 13, 2015

St. Anastasia This martyr enjoys the distinction, unique in the Roman liturgy, of having a special commemoration in the second Mass on Christmas day. This Mass was originally celebrated not in honour of the birth of Christ, but in commemoration of this martyr, and towards the end of the fifth century her name was also […]

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April 16 – Martyred in the name of Equality

April 13, 2015

Just a few of the many martyrs during the French Revolution († 1792-1799) 16 April 1794 in Avrillé, Maine-et-Loire (France) Pierre Delépine layperson of the diocese of Angers born: 24 May 1732 in Marigné, Maine-et-Loire (France) Jean Ménard layperson of the diocese of Angers; married born: 16 November 1736 in Andigné, Maine-et-Loire (France) Renée Bourgeais […]

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Prince Harry Urges People To Stop Selfies

April 9, 2015

According to The Guardian: Prince Harry has declared “selfies are bad”, during a jovial walkabout as he greeted hundreds of well-wishers who gathered to catch a glimpse of him as he arrived in Australia. The prince, who spent around 20 minutes shaking hands and speaking to those who braved the rain to see him, advised […]

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‘Kandia Regal’ Named After Romanian Royals

April 9, 2015

According to The Royal Forums: Three new lines of chocolate – ‘HRH Princess Margarita’, ‘HRH Prince Radu’ and ‘Peles Castle’ – were launched during a presentation at the Elisabeta Palace today. They have been produced by the company Kandia Dulce, forming the ‘Kandia Regal’ range, and each have a different cocoa content. “Each generation, starting […]

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The Catholic Password

April 9, 2015

On the day of the famous battle of Bull-Run, General Smith, who commanded the army of the South, arrived along with his division too late to know what was the password. He foresaw that if he advanced without it he would be fired upon by his own army, and if he remained where he was […]

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That Which Is Marvelous Is For Everyone

April 9, 2015

We ought to desire smaller things because of the greater things, and in function of the latter. It is necessary that the soul be formed in such a way that a person may, in meditating on Charlemagne, at the same time be able to stop and become enthused and enchanted when, in a park, his […]

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April 10 – Friend of Cluny

April 9, 2015

St. Fulbert of Chartres Bishop, born between 952 and 962; died 10 April, 1028 or 1029. Mabillon and others think that he was born in Italy, probably at Rome; but Pfister, his latest biographer, designates as his birthplace the Diocese of Laudun in the present department of Gard in France. He was of humble parentage […]

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April 11 – He excommunicated the king, who murdered him as he celebrated Mass

April 9, 2015

Saint Stanislaus of Cracow In pictures he is given the episcopal insignia and the sword. Larger paintings represent him in a court or kneeling before the altar and receiving the fatal blow. His parents, Belislaus and Bogna, pious and noble Catholics, gave him a religious education. After the death of his parents he distributed his… […]

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April 12 – St. Teresa of the Andes

April 9, 2015

Saint Teresa of the Andes, O.C.D. (July 13, 1900 – April 12, 1920), also known as Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes (Spanish: Teresa de Jesús de los Andes), was a Chilean nun of the Discalced Carmelite order. She was born Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández y Solar in Santiago, Chile […]

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April 12 – Crusader in every sense of the word

April 9, 2015

Bl. Angelo Carletti di Chivasso Moral theologian of the order of Friars Minor; born at Chivasso in Piedmont, in 1411; and died at Coni, in Piedmont, in 1495. From his tenderest years the Blessed Angelo was remarkable for the holiness and purity of his life. He attended the University of Bologna, where he received the […]

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April 12 – Pope St. Julius I

April 9, 2015

(337-352) The immediate successor of Pope Silvester, Arcus, ruled the Roman Church for only a very short period – from 18 January to 7 October, 336 – and after his death the papal chair remained vacant for four months. What occasioned this comparatively long vacancy is unknown. On 6 February, 337, Julius, son of Rustics […]

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April 13 – This Prince Defied His Family

April 9, 2015

St. Hermengild Date of birth unknown; died 13 April, 585. Leovigild, the Arian King of the Visigoths (569-86), had two sons, Hermengild and Reccared, by his first marriage with the Catholic Princess Theodosia. Hermengild married, in 576, Ingundis, a Frankish… Read more here.

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April 13 – Born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and dwarfed

April 9, 2015

Blessed Margaret of Castello (1287–1320) is the patroness of the poor, crippled, and the unwanted. She was born blind, lame, deformed, hunchbacked and a dwarf, into a family of nobles in the castle of Metola, in southeast of Florence. As a child, her parents Parisio and Emilia imprisoned her for 14 years so no one […]

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April 13 – Pope St. Martin I

April 9, 2015

Pope St. Martin I Martyr, born at Todi on the Tiber, son of Fabricius; elected Pope at Rome, 21 July, 649, to succeed Theodore I; d at Cherson in the present peninsulas of Krym, 16 Sept., 655, after a reign of 6 years, one month and twenty six days, having ordained eleven priests, five deacons […]

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April 7 – Father of Modern Pedagogy

April 6, 2015

St. John Baptist de la Salle Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, educational reformer, and father of modern pedagogy, was born at Reims, 30 April, 1651, and died at Saint-Yon, Rouen, on Good Friday, 7 April, 1719. The family of de la Salle traces its origin to Johan Salla, who, […]

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April 8 – Together with a noble who escaped the Terror, she founded the Sisters of Notre Dame

April 6, 2015

St. Julie Billiart (Also Julia). Foundress, and first superior-general of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame of Namur, born 12 July, 1751, at Cuvilly, a village of Picardy, in the Diocese of Beauvais and the Department of Oise, France; died 8 April, 1816, at the motherhouse of her institute, Namur, Belgium. She was […]

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April 9 – She persuaded her husband the Count to become a monk

April 6, 2015

St. Waudru She was daughter to the princess St. Bertille, elder sister to St. Aldegondes, and wife to Madelgaire, count of Hainault, and one of the principal lords of King Dagobert’s court. After bearing him two sons and two daughters, she induced him to embrace the monastic state at Haumont, near Maubeuge, taking… Read more […]

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April 9 – Mary of Cleophas

April 6, 2015

Mary of Cleophas This title occurs only in John, xix, 25. A comparison of the lists of those who stood at the foot of the cross would seem to identify her with Mary, the mother of James the Less and Joseph ( Mark, xv, 40; cf. Matt., xxvii, 56). Some have indeed tried to identify […]

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St. Peter Chrysologus

April 6, 2015

St. Peter Chrysologus Born at Imola, 406; died there, 450. His biography, first written by Agnellus (Liber pontificalis ecclesiae Ravennatis) in the ninth century, gives but scanty information about him. He was baptised, educated, and ordained deacon by Cornelius, Bishop of Imola, and was elevated to the Bishopric of Ravenna in 433. There are indications […]

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The King’s Hand

April 2, 2015

St. Oswald, King of Northumbria, was one day at table with the holy Bishop Adrian. It was the great festival of Easter. During dinner a servant came and said to the King: “My lord, a multitude of poor people have just come to the gates, and are asking an alms. What am I to do […]

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New Succession Rules for United Kingdom and its realms

April 2, 2015

According to The Royal Forums: The Succession to the Crown Act 2013 came into effect…March 26… Marriage to Roman Catholics is now allowed while retaining rights to the throne (the monarch must be Anglican however). Several members of the extended royal family will see the new Act impact upon their succession rights: Prince Michael of […]

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The Heron and His Little World

April 2, 2015

The heron has that white body from which protrudes that delicate and elegantly curved breast, with a small head and a very large beak, which symbolizes the capacity to captivate, foresee, and act from a distance. We only perceive it move when, with those long legs and an elegant gait, it raises its broad foot […]

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