General Douglas MacArthur entering his 1950 Chrysler Crown Imperial Limousine in April 1951.

General Douglas MacArthur entering his 1950 Chrysler Crown Imperial Limousine in April 1951.

Late one night the General was returning…in his chauffeured military car. In a remote area, his car stopped for a red traffic signal in a wooded area. The door of his car was opened and a bandit exclaimed to the General, “This is a stickup; put up your hands.”

The General instantly replied, “I am a General in the United States Army. I never put up my hands for anybody.”

The bandit drew back and replied, “Sir, I apologize.”

He then saluted the General, slammed the door and disappeared into the darkness. Just then, the signal turned green. The incident was never reported by the General, but it came to light later through the General’s chauffeur.

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Joseph Choate, Douglas MacArthur As I Knew Him: A Narrative Eulogy of the Magnificent Statesmanship of General Douglas MacArthur (Privately printed, 1986), 67.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 526

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Edward, the Black Prince, accepts the surrender of John II of France at the Battle of Poitiers.

Edward, the Black Prince, accepts the surrender of John II of France at the Battle of Poitiers.

If a knight imprisons an adversary who is also a knight, whom he saw fight with great bravery and proved to be a tough nut to crack, as soon as the knight imprisoned him, the knight jumps off the horse, congratulates him for his bravery and takes him prisoner, saying, ‘Do you accept to be arrested with your word of honor that you will not flee?’ If you do, I will not keep you under watch. You can walk about our camp wherever you want and no guards will follow you. This is my way of showing appreciation for your great mettle and character.”

Naturally, you need to have a keen eye to be able to do this! Not just anyone can do it. But in general, a courageous knight trusts in the character of another courageous knight; because courage is a form of loyalty. And one who is very courageous—not courageous like a bandit, but like a hero—does not know how to lie. So the other knight trusts him.

The Surrender of Breda

The Surrender of Breda

And later the winner sends good clothes, good food rations and a special tent to the great man he defeated. This is gentlemanly. But here there is no rivalry; on the contrary, the winner glorifies the one he defeated. This is beautiful.

 

(Excerpt from a Chá, Sunday, Sept. 17, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

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St. Augustine of Canterbury

First Archbishop of Canterbury, Apostle of the English; date of birth unknown; died 26 May, 604.

Symbols: cope, pallium, and mitre as Bishop of Canterbury, and pastoral staff and gospels as missionary.

Nothing is known of his youth except that he was probably a Roman of the better class, and that early in life he become a monk in the famous monastery of St. Andrew erected by St. Gregory out of his own patrimony on the Cælian Hill. It was thus amid the religious intimacies of the Benedictine Rule and in the bracing atmosphere of a recent foundation…

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Blessed Margaret Pole

Bl Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, by unknown artist.

Countess of Salisbury, martyr; born at Castle Farley, near Bath, 14 August, 1473; martyred at East Smithfield Green, 28 May, 1541.

She was the daughter of George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, and Isabel, elder daughter of the Earl of Warwick (the king-maker), and the sister of Edmund of Warwick who, under Henry VII, paid with his life the penalty of being the last male representative of the Yorkist line (28 Nov., 1499)…

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St. William of Gellone

Painting of Saint William of Gellone by Antonio de Pereda

Painting of Saint William of Gellone by Antonio de Pereda

Born 755; died 28 May, c. 812; was the second count of Toulouse, having attained that dignity in 790. He is by some writers also given the title of Duke of Aquitaine. This saint is the hero of the ninth-century “Roman de Guillame au court nez”, but the story of his life is told in a more reliable form by the anonymous author of the biography which was written soon after the saint’s death, or before the eleventh century according to Mabillon, or during the eleventh century according to the Bollandist Henschen.  His father’s name was Theoderic, his mother’s Aldana, and he was in some way connected with the family of Charles the Great, at whose court he was present as a youth. The great emperor employed him against the Saracen invaders from Spain, whom he defeated at Orange. In 804 he founded a Benedictine monastery, since called S. Guilhem le Desert, in the valley of Gellone, near Lodeve in the Diocese of Maguelonne, and subjected it to the famous St. Benedict of Aniane, whose monastery was close at hand. Two years later (806) he himself became a monk at Gellone, where he remained until his death. His testament, granting certain property to Gellone, and another subjecting that monastery to the Abbot of Aniane, are given by Mabillon. His feast is on 28 May, the day of his death.

MABILLON, Acta SS. O.S.B. saec. IV, I (Venice, 1735), 67-86; Acta SS., VI May, 154-72.

Raymund Webster (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes

St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes teaching the children.

St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes teaching the children.

Born at Quito, Ecuador, 31 Oct. 1618; died at Quito, 26 May, 1645. On both sides of her family she was sprung from an illustrious line of ancestors, her father being Don Girolamo Flores Zenel de Paredes, a nobleman of Toledo and her mother Doña Mariana Cranobles de Xaramilo, a descendant of one of the best Spanish families. Her birth was accompanied by most unusual phenomena in the heavens, clearly connected with the child and juridically attested at the time of the process of beatification. Almost from infancy she gave signs of an extraordinary attraction to prayer and mortification, of love of God and devotion to the Blessed Virgin; and besides being the recipient of many other remarkable manifestations of divine favour was a number of times miraculously preserved from death. At the age of ten years she made the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. She was very desirous of conveying the light of faith to the peoples sitting in darkness, and later of entering a monastery; but when God made it plain to her that He wished neither the one nor the other of these pious designs, she acquiesced in the Divine will, and made for herself a solitude in her own home where, apart from all worldly cares and closely united to God, she gave herself up to the practice of unheard-of corporal austerities. The fast which she kept was so strict that she took scarcely an ounce of dry bread every eight or ten days. The food which miraculously sustained her life, as in the case of St. Catherine and St. Rose of Lima, was, according to the sworn testimony of many witnesses, the Eucharistic Bread alone which she received every morning in Holy Communion. She possessed an ecstatic gift of prayer, predicted the future, saw distant events as if they were passing before her, read the secrets of hearts, cured diseases by a mere sign of the Cross, or by sprinkling the sufferer with holy water, and at least once she restored a dead person to life. The very day she died her sanctity was shown in a wonderful manner, for immediately after her death there sprang up from her blood and blossomed and bloomed a pure white lily, a prodigy which has given her the title of “The Lily of Quito”.

An alabaster plaque of St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes at the National Museum in Warsaw.

An alabaster plaque of St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes at the National Museum in Warsaw.

The first preliminary steps towards the beatification were taken by Monsignor Alfonso della Pegna, who instituted the process of inquiring into and collecting evidence for the sanctity of her life, her virtues and her miracles; but the authenticated copy of the examination of the witnesses was not forwarded to Rome until 1754. The Sacred Congregation of Rites, having discussed and approved of this process, decided in favour of the formal introduction of the cause, and Benedict XIV signed the commission for introducing the cause 17 December, 1757. The Apostolic process concerning the virtues of the Venerable Mary Anne de Paredes was drawn up and examined in due form by the two Preparatory Congregations and by the General Congregation of Rites, and orders were given by Pius VI for the publication of the decree attesting the heroic character of her virtues. The process concerning the two miracles wrought through the intercession of the servant of God was subsequently prepared and, at the request of the Very Rev. John Roothaan, General of the Society of Jesus, was examined and accepted by the three congregations, and was formally approved 11 Jan., 1817, by Pius IX. The General Congregation having decided in favour of proceeding to the beatification, Pius IX commanded the Brief of Beatification to be prepared. Very Rev. Peter Beckx, General of the Society of Jesus, petitioned Cardinal Patrizi to order the publication of the Brief; his request was granted. The Brief was read and the solemn beatification took place in the Vatican Basilica 10 Nov., 1853. Many miracles have been the reward of those who have invoked her intercession, especially in America, of which she seems pleased to show herself the especial patroness.

BOERO, Blessed Mary Ann of Jesus; The Roman Breviary.

J. H. Fisher (Catholic Encylopedia)

[Nobility.org note: She was canonized in 1950]

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St. Germain

St. Germanus of ParisBishop of Paris; born near Autun, Saône-et-Loire, c. 496; died at Paris, 28 May, 576. He studied at Avalon and also at Luzy under the guidance of his cousin Scapilion, a priest. At the age of thirty-four he was ordained by St. Agrippinus of Autun and became Abbot of Saint-Symphorien near that town. His characteristic virtue, love for the poor, manifested itself so strongly in his alms-giving, that his monks, fearing he would give away everything, rebelled. As he happen…

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St. Maximinus

Bishop of Trier, born at Silly near Poitiers, died there, 29 May, 352 or 12 Sept., 349.

St. Maximinus

He was educated and ordained priest by St. Agritius, whom he succeeded as Bishop of Trier in 332 or 335. At that time Trier was the government seat of the Western Emperor and, by force of his office, Maximinus stood in close relation with the Emperors Constantine II and Constans. He was a strenuous defender of the orthodox faith against Arianism and an intimate friend of St. Athanasius, whom he harboured as an honoured guest during his exile of two years and four months (336-8) at Trier. He likewise received with honours the banished patriarch Paul of Constantinople in 341 and effected his recall to Constantinople. When four Arian bishops came from Antioch to Trier in 342 with the purpose of winning Emperor Constans to their side, Maximinus refused to receive them and induced the emperor to reject their proposals. In conjunction with Pope Julius I and Bishop Hosius of Cordova, he persuaded the Emperor Constans to convene the Synod of Sardica in 343 and probably took part in it. That the Arians considered him as one of their chief opponents is evident from the fact that they condemned by name along with Pope Julius I and Hosius of Cordova at their heretical synod of Philippopolis in 343 (Mans, “Sacrorum Conc. nova et ampl. Coll.”, III, 136 sq.). In 345 he took part in the Synod of Milan and is said to have presided over a synod held at Cologne in 346, where Bishop Euphratas of Cologne was deposed on account of his leanings toward Arianism. {Concerning the authenticity of the Acts of this synod see the new French translation of Hefele’s “Conciliengeschichte”, I, ii (Paris, 1907), pp. 830-34.}

He also sent Sts. Castor and Lubentius as missionaries to the valleys of the Mosel and the Lahn.

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It is doubtful whether the Maximinus whom the usurper Magnentius sent as legate to Constantinople in the interests of peace is identical with the Bishop of Trier (Athanasius, “Apol. ad Const. Imp.”, 9).

His cult began right after his death. His feast is celebrated on 29 May, on which day his name stands in the martyrologies of St. Jerome, St. Bede, St. Ado, and others. Trier honours him as its patron. In the autumn of 353 his body was buried in the church of St. John near Trier, where in the seventh century was founded the famous Benedictine abbey of St. Maximinus, which flourished till 1802.

A life, full of fabulous accounts, by a monk of St. Maximinus in the eighth century, is printed in Acta SS., May, VII, 21-24. The same life, revised by SERVATUS LUPUS, is found in MIGNE, P.L. CXIX, 21-24, and in Mon. Germ. Script. rerum Merov., III, 74-82; DIEL, Der heilige Maximinus und der heilige Paulinus, Bischofe von Trier (Trier, 1875); CHAMARD, St. Maximin de Treves, St. Athenase et les semi-Ariens in Revue des Quest. hist., II (Paris, 1867), 66-96; BENNETT in Dict. Christ. Biog., s.v.

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Saint Ferdinand III of Castile

Saint Ferdinand III of Castile. Painted by Spanish School.

King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252. He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.

In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favor, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leon, though not without civil strife, since many were opposed to the union of the two kingdoms. He took as his counselors the wisest men in the State, saw to the strict administration of justice, and took the greatest care not to overburden his subjects with taxation, fearing, as he said, the curse of one poor woman more than a whole army of Saracens. Following his mother’s advice, Ferdinand, in 1219, married Beatrice, the daughter of Philip of Swabia, King of Germany, one of the most virtuous princesses of her time. God blessed this union with seven children: six princes…

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St. Joan of Arc

Statue of St. Joan of Arc in New Orleans, Louisiana

In French Jeanne d’Arc; by her contemporaries commonly known as la Pucelle (the Maid).

Born at Domremy in Champagne, probably on 6 January, 1412; died at Rouen, 30 May, 1431. The village of Domremy lay upon the confines of territory which recognized the suzerainty of the Duke of Burgundy, but in the protracted conflict between the Armagnacs (the party of Charles VII, King of France), on the one hand, and the Burgundians in alliance with the English, on the other, Domremy had always remained loyal to Charles…

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In the motu proprio Fin dalla prima, of December 18, 1903, Saint Pius X summarizes the doctrine of Leo XIII on social inequalities:

1. Human society, as God established it, is composed of unequal elements, just as the members of the human body are unequal. To make them all equal would be impossible, and would result in the destruction of society itself (encyclical Quod Apostolici muneris).

2. The equality of the various members of society is only in that all men originate from God the Creator; that they were redeemed by Jesus Christ, and that they must be judged by God and rewarded or punished in strict accordance with their merits and demerits (encyclical Quod Apostolici muneris).

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3. Wherefore, it results that, in human society, it is God’s will that there should be princes and vassals, proprietors and proletarians, rich and poor, learned and ignorant, nobles and plebeians, all of whom, united in the bond of love, should help one another to achieve their final end in Heaven, and their material and moral well-being here on earth (encyclical Quod Apostolici muneris).

(Acta Sanctae Sedis [Rome: Ex Typographia Polyglotta, 1903-1904], Vol. 36, p. 341.)

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents V, p. 481.

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This commemoration was introduced in the liturgical calendar by decree of Pope Pius VII on September 16, 1815, in thanksgiving for his happy return to Rome after a long and painful captivity in Savona and France due to Napoleon’s tyrannical power.

By order of Napoleon, Pius VII was arrested, 5 July, 1808, and detained a prisoner for three years at Savona, and then at Fontainebleau. In January, 1814, after the battle of Leipzig, he was brought back to Savona and set free…

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St. Vincent of Lérins

Saint Vincent of LerinsFeast on 24 May, an ecclesiastical writer in Southern Gaul in the fifth century. His work is much better known than his life. Almost all our information concerning him is contained in Gennadius, “De viris illustribus” (lxiv). He entered the monastery of Lérins (today Isle St. Honorat), where under the pseudonym of Peregrinus he wrote his “Commonitorium” (434). He died before 450, and probably shortly after 434. St. Eucherius of Lyons calls him a holy man, conspicuous for eloquence and knowledge; there is no reliable authority for…

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Bl. Hermann Joseph

Premonstratensian monk and mystic; born at Cologne about 1150; died at Hoven, 7 April, 1241.

According to the biography by Razo Bonvisinus, contemporary prior of Steinfeld (Acta SS., 7 April, I, 679), Hermann was the son of poor parents who had once been rich. At the age of seven he attended school and very early he began the tender devotion to the Blessed Virgin for which he was known during his entire life. At every available moment he could be found at the church of St. Mary on the Capitol, where he would kneel wrapt in prayer…

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Pope St. Gregory VII

(HILDEBRAND).

One of the greatest of the Roman pontiffs and one of the most remarkable men of all times; born between the years 1020 and 1025, at Soana, or Ravacum, in Tuscany; died 25 May, 1085, at Salerno.

Pope St. Gregory VII

The early years of his life are involved in considerable obscurity. His name, Hildebrand (Hellebrand)—signifying to those of his contemporaries that loved him “a bright flame”, to those that hated him “a brand of hell”—would indicate some Lombard connection of his family, though at a later time, it probably also suggested the fabled descent from the noble family of the Aldobrandini. That he was of humble origin—vir de plebe, as he is styled in the letter of a contemporary abbot—can scarcely be doubted. His father Bonizo is said by…

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St. Mary Magdalen de’ Pazzi

Carmelite Virgin, born 2 April, 1566; died 25 May, 1607.

Painting of St. Mary Madgalen de'Pazzi at age 16.

Of outward events there were very few in the saint’s life. She came of two noble families, her father being Camillo Geri de’ Pazzi and her mother a Buondelmonti. She was baptized, and named Caterina, in the great baptistery. Her childhood much resembled that of some other women saints who have become great mystics, in an early love of prayer and penance, great charity to the poor, an apostolic spirit of teaching religious truths, and a charm and sweetness…

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THE APOSTLE OF ROME

St. Philip Romolo Neri

Born at Florence, Italy, 22 July, 1515; died 27 May, 1595. Philip’s family originally came from Castelfranco but had lived for many generations in Florence, where not a few of its members had practised the learned professions, and therefore took rank with the Tuscan nobility. Among these was Philip’s own father, Francesco Neri, who eked out an insufficient private fortune with what he earned as a notary. A circumstance which had no small influence on the life of the saint was Francesco’s friendship with the Dominicans; for it was from the friars of S. Marco, amid the memories of Savonarola, that Philip received many of his early religious impressions. Besides a younger brother, who died in early childhood, Philip had two younger sisters, Caterina and Elisabetta….

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Saint Bruno of Würzburg

(c. 1005 – 26 May 1045)

The statue of Saint Bruno on Würzburg's Alte Mainbrücke

Also known as Bruno of Carinthia, he was imperial chancellor of Italy from 1027 to 1034 for Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, to whom he was related, and from 1034 until his death prince-bishop of Würzburg.

Bruno was the son of Conrad I, Duke of Carinthia, and Matilda of Swabia, and thus a cousin of the Salian Emperor Conrad II. He courted Agnes of Poitou on behalf of Conrad’s son and successor Emperor Henry III. He also accompanied Henry on his second Hungarian Campaign, during which Bruno died in an accident at Persenbeug on the Danube in the present Lower Austria…

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Leo XIII teaches in his allocution to the Roman Patriciate and Nobility on January 24, 1903:

Coronation of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth of Austria as King and Queen of Hungary, on June 8th, 1867, in Buda, Capital of Hungary. Work of Ödön (Edmund) Tull.

The Roman Pontiffs have always taken care to equally protect and ameliorate the lot of the humble, and to support and augment the honor of the upper classes. For they carry on the mission of Jesus Christ, not only in the religious order, but in the social order as well….

For this reason the Church, while preaching to humanity of the universal filiation from one Father in heaven, recognizes as being equally providential the distinction of classes in human society; for this reason does she impress upon her flock that only in the mutual respect of rights and duties and in charity to one another lies the secret of just balance, honest well-being, true peace, and flourishing peoples.

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Thus We too, in deploring the present disturbances troubling peaceful human society, have turned Our gaze repeatedly to the lowest classes, the ones most perfidiously menaced by iniquitous sects, and have offered them the maternal succor of the Church. Repeatedly, We have declared that the remedy to their ills will never be a subversive equalization of the social orders, but rather that brotherhood which, without disparaging the dignity of rank, unites the hearts of all in a single bond of Christian love. (Leonis XIII Pontificis Maximi Acta, Vol. 22, p. 368).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents V, pp. 480-481.

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According to The Crown Chronicles:

Her Majesty…laid a wreath at the foot of the new memorial, which is dedicated to the fallen of the regiment of The Duke of Lancaster…

As the Last Post played and the minute’s silence ensued, Her Majesty was seen to shed a tear, before wiping it away and closing her eyes for a few moments to compose herself once more.

There have been less than a handful of occasions on which The Queen has publicly cried, including Remembrance Sunday after the death of her sister and mother in 2002, and the decommissioning of Royal Yacht Britannia in 1997.

To read the entire article in The Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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First time: Queen Elizabeth II uses lift instead of stairs at State Opening of Parliament

May 19, 2016

According to The Telegraph: The Queen has for the first time chosen to use a lift to get to the House of Lords for the State Opening of Parliament, in one of the most public concessions to her age to date. A spokesman said: “It is a modest adjustment made for the Queen’s comfort.” …staff […]

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State Opening of Parliament still marked by fear of Catholic plot

May 19, 2016

According to The Crown Chronicles: The State Opening of Parliament begins a while before The Queen arrives at Westminster: it starts with the searching of the cellars. The Yeomen of the Guard, the oldest of the Royal bodyguards, search the cellars beneath the Houses of Parliament. This is a precaution to prevent a modern-day attempt […]

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Archbishop Montmorency-Laval, Father of the Canadian Church

May 19, 2016

Well did Laval deserve that his name should live in that of the university which a century and a half after his death owed its existence to his bounty. This father of the Canadian Church, who has left so deep an impress on one of the communities which form the vast population of North America, […]

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The knight likes to suffer for Our Lord Jesus Christ

May 19, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Let us say that a knight is sent to conquer the island of Rhodes, a stepping stone to conquer the Holy Land. This did not happen historically, it’s only for the sake of argument. He goes with the idea of conquering the Holy Land, the Holy Sepulcher, etc. – but […]

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May 20 – St. Bernardine of Siena

May 19, 2016

St. Bernardine of Siena Friar Minor, missionary, and reformer, often called the “Apostle of Italy”, b. of the noble family of Albizeschi at Massa, a Sienese town of which his father was then governor, 8 September, 1380; d. at Aquila in the Abruzzi, 20 May, 1444. Left an orphan at six Bernardine was brought up […]

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May 20 – Mentor of the Duke of Ferrara

May 19, 2016

Blessed Colomba of Rieti Born at Rieti in Umbria, Italy, 1467; died at Perugia, 1501. Blessed Colomba of Rieti is always called after her birthplace, though she actually spent the greater part of her life away from it. Her celebrity is based — as it was even in her lifetime — mainly on two things: […]

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May 20 – King of the East Angles

May 19, 2016

St. Ethelbert Date of birth unknown; died 794. King of the East Angles, was, according to the “Speculum Historiale” of Richard of Cirencester (who died about 1401), the son of King Ethelred and Leofrana, a lady of Mercia. Brought up in piety, he was a man of singular humility. Urged to marry, he declared his […]

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May 21 – De Soto meets the mighty Mississippi

May 19, 2016

The next day, upon which De Soto was hoping to see the chief, a large company of Indians came, fully armed and in war-paint, with the purpose of attacking the Christians. But when they saw that the Governor had drawn up his army in line of battle, they remained a cross-bow shot away for half […]

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May 21 – Missionary to the Mohammedans

May 19, 2016

François Bourgade A French missionary and philosopher, b. 7 July, 1806, at Gaujan, department of Gers; d. 21 May, 1866, at Paris. He pursued his theological studies at the seminary of Auch and was ordained priest in 1832. His immediate request to be authorized to work among the infidels of Africa was granted only in […]

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May 21 – The last of his noble lineage, he started a spiritual one

May 19, 2016

St. Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod Bishop of Marseilles, and founder of the Congregation of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, b. at Aix, in Provence, 1 August, 1782; d. at Marseilles 21 May, 1861. De Mazenod was the offspring of a noble family of southern France, and even in his tender years he showed unmistakable […]

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May 22 – Hanged for Printing a Book

May 19, 2016

Blessed James Duckett Martyr, born at Gilfortrigs in the parish of Skelsmergh in Westmoreland, England, date uncertain, of an ancient family of that county; died 9 April, 1601. He was a bookseller and publisher in London. His godfather was the well-known martyr James Leybourbe of Skelsmergh. He seems, however, to have been brought up a […]

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May 22 – Queen’s Confessor

May 19, 2016

Blessed John Forest Born in 1471, presumably at Oxford, where his surname was then not unknown; suffered 22 May, 1538. At the age of twenty he received the habit of St. Francis at Greenwich, in the church of the Friars Minor of the Regular Observance, called for brevity’s sake “Observants”. Nine years later we find […]

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May 22 – St. Rita of Cascia

May 19, 2016

St. Rita of Cascia Born at Rocca Porena in the Diocese of Spoleto, 1386; died at the Augustinian convent of Cascia, 1456. Feast, 22 May. Represented as holding roses, or roses and figs, and sometimes with a wound in her forehead. According to the “Life” (Acta SS., May, V, 224) written at the time of […]

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May 23 – Appointed bishop to replace a corrupt one, then imprisoned for defending the King’s legitimate wife

May 19, 2016

St. Ivo of Chartres (YVO, YVES). One of the most notable bishops of France at the time of the Investiture struggles and the most important canonist before Gratian in the Occident, born of a noble family about 1040; died in 1116. From the neighbourhood of Beauvais, his native country, he went for his studies first […]

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May 23 – St. John Baptist de Rossi

May 19, 2016

St. John Baptist de Rossi (De Rubeis). Born at Voltaggio in the Diocese of Genoa, 22 February, 1698; died at Rome, 23 May, 1764; feast on 23 May. His parents, Charles de Rossi and Frances Anfossi, were not rich in earthly goods, but had solid piety and the esteem of their fellow-citizens. Of their four […]

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May 23 – Chevalier of the Order of Leopold

May 19, 2016

Fr. Pierre-Jean De Smet Missionary among the North American Indians, born at Termonde (Dendermonde), Belgium, 30 Jan., 1801; died at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., 23 May, 1873. He emigrated to the United States in 1821 through a desire for missionary labours, and entered the Jesuit novitiate at Whitemarsh, Maryland. In 1823, however, at the suggestion […]

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Just as the Diverse Members in the Human Body Are Arranged Among Themselves, So Also the Social Classes Should Integrate in Society

May 19, 2016

[In the encyclical Rerum Novarum, of May 15, 1891, Pope Leo XIII affirms]: The great mistake made in regard to the matter now under consideration is to take up with the notion that class is naturally hostile to class, and that the wealthy and the workingmen are intended by nature to live in mutual conflict. […]

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Queen Elizabeth II: shock at the rude manners of Chinese Communist tyrants

May 16, 2016

According to The New York Times: Queen Elizabeth II was filmed saying that Chinese officials were “very rude” during President Xi Jinping’s state visit to Britain last year. The remarks were included in a video of the party that a longtime palace-approved pool cameraman recorded for the palace. The video was officially distributed to journalists […]

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Why May 10 is King’s Day in modern Romania

May 16, 2016

According to the Romania Insider: …on May 10, 1866, when Prince Karl of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (Carol I) arrived in Bucharest and was proclaimed Ruling Prince of Romania. …in 1877 during the Russo-Turkish War…again on May 10, Carol I signed the Romania’s proclamation of independence from the Ottoman Empire. Prince Carol then assumed command of the Russo/Romanian […]

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Social Inequality Redounds to the Advantage of All

May 16, 2016

Leo XIII returns to the subject of social inequality in the encyclical Rerum Novarum, of May 15, 1891: Let it, then, be taken as granted, in the first place, that the condition of things human must be endured, for it is impossible to reduce civil society to one dead level. Socialists may in that intent […]

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The Great Siege of Malta, May 18–September 11, 1565, was won because of one man: Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Valette

May 16, 2016

On the morning of August 18th the excessively heavy bombardment of Senglea warned them that an attack was imminent. It was not slow to develop. The moment that the rumble of the guns died down, the Iayalars and Janissaries were seen streaming forward across the no-man’s-land to the south. The attack developed in the same […]

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May 18 – St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr

May 16, 2016

St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr Eric [1] was descended of a most illustrious Swedish family: in his youth he laid a solid foundation of virtue and learning, and took to wife Christina, daughter of Ingo IV, king of Sweden. Upon the death of King Smercher in 1141, he was, purely for his extraordinary virtues […]

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May 18 – Martyr of Envy

May 16, 2016

Pope St. John I Died at Ravenna on 18 or 19 May (according to the most popular calculation), 526. A Tuscan by birth and the son of Constantius, he was, after an interregnum of seven days, elected on 13 August, 523, and occupied the Apostolic see for two years, nine months, and seven days. We […]

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May 19 – Charlemagne’s Scholar

May 16, 2016

Blessed Alcuin of York An eminent educator, scholar, and theologian born about 735; died 19 May, 804. He came of noble Northumbrian parentage, but the place of his birth is a matter of dispute. It was probably in or near York. While still a mere child, he entered the cathedral school founded at that place […]

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May 19 – He Grabbed the Devil By the Nose

May 16, 2016

St. Dunstan of Canterbury Archbishop and confessor, and one of the greatest saints of the Anglo-Saxon Church; born near Glastonbury on the estate of his father, Heorstan, a West Saxon noble. His mother, Cynethryth, a woman of saintly life, was miraculously forewarned of the sanctity of the child within her. She was in the church […]

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The prince and the garrulous watch-maker

May 12, 2016

One day when the Duke was traveling from Munich to Vienna, without submitting himself to any of the fuss which generally surrounds the voyages of princes, a gentleman, at the moment when the train was about to steam out of the station, entered the ordinary first-class carriage in which he was established. A conversation soon […]

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The knight is generous and detached

May 12, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira So the true knight takes his generosity to such a point that if he goes into battle and has a brother-in-arms who is fighting magnificently but whose sword all of a sudden drops from his hand, his reaction is not, “Great, I won’t have this one as a rival!” but […]

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May 13 – “Can anyone receive Jesus into his heart and not die?”

May 12, 2016

Blessed Imelda Lambertini (1322 – May 13, 1333) is the patroness of First Holy Communicants. Imelda was born in 1322 in Bologna, the only child of Count Egano Lambertini and Castora Galuzzi. Her parents were devout Catholics and were known for their charity and generosity to the underprivileged of Bologna. As a very young girl, […]

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May 13 – St. Peter de Regalado

May 12, 2016

St. Peter de Regalado (REGALATUS) A Friar Minor and reformer, born at Valladolid, 1390; died at Aguilera, 30 March, 1456. His parents were of noble birth and conspicuous for their wealth and virtue. Having lost his father in his early youth, he was piously educated by his mother. At the age of ten years Peter […]

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May 13 – St. John the Silent

May 12, 2016

St. John the Silent (Hesychastes, Silentiarius). Bishop of Colonia, in Armenia, b. at Nicopolis, Armenia, 8 Jan., 452; d. 558. His parents, Encratius and Euphemia, wealthy and honoured, belonged to families that had done great service in the State and had given to it renowned generals and governors, but they were also good Christians, and […]

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May 14 – Bl. Gil of Santarem

May 12, 2016

Bl. Gil of Santarem A Portuguese Dominican: born at Vaozela, diocese of Viseu, about 1185; died at Santarem, 14 May, 1265. His father, Rodrigo Pelayo Valladaris, was governor of Coimbra and councillor of Sancho I. It was the wish of his parents that Gil should enter the ecclesiastical state, and the king was very lavish […]

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May 14 – The Right to Revolt

May 12, 2016

May 14, 1264: Simon de Montfort Defeats King Henry III at Battle of Lewes The Battle of Lewes was one of two main battles of the conflict known as the Second Barons’ War. It took place at Lewes in Sussex, on 14 May 1264. It marked the high point of the career of Simon de […]

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May 15 – Beautiful Princess, Tragic Story

May 12, 2016

St. Dymphna Virgin and martyr. The earliest historical account of the veneration of St. Dymphna dates from the middle of the thirteenth century. Under Bishop Guy I of Cambrai (1238-47), Pierre, a canon of the church of Saint Aubert at Cambrai, wrote a “Vita” of the saint, from which we learn that she had been […]

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May 15 – Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac

May 12, 2016

Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac (December 27, 1556 – February 2, 1640) was founderess of the order The Company of Mary Our Lady. She was born in Bordeaux, France in 1556 to a prominent family. Her father, Richard de Lestonnac, was a member of the French Parliament while her mother, Jeanne Eyquem, was the sister of […]

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May 15 – William Lockhart

May 12, 2016

William Lockhart Son of the Rev. Alexander Lockhart of Waringham, Surry; b. 22 Aug., 1820; d. at St. Etheldreda’s Priory, Eby Place, Holborn, London, 15 May, 1892. He was a cousin of J. G. Lockhart, the well-known biographer of Sir Walter Scott. After studying first at Bedford Grammar School and, afterwards under various tutors, he […]

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May 16 – Leper King

May 12, 2016

Modern society obsessively avoids suffering, risk and danger. It secures everything with seatbelts and safety rails, air conditions the summer heat, prints warnings on coffee cups and advises that safety glasses should be used while working with hammers. Certainly such precautions have prevented misfortune. However, since heroism and excellence are born from confronting rather than […]

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May 16 – St. Honoratus of Amiens

May 12, 2016

Saint Honoratus of Amiens (Honoré, sometimes Honorius, Honortus) (d. May 16, ca. 600) was the seventh bishop of Amiens. His feast day is May 16. He was born in Port-le-Grand (Ponthieu) near Amiens to a noble family. He was said to be virtuous from birth. He was taught by his predecessor in the bishopric of […]

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May 16 – Patron of Poland

May 12, 2016

Saint Andrew Bobola Martyr, born of an old and illustrious Polish family, in the Palatinate of Sandomir, 1590; died at Janów, 16 May, 1657. Having entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus at Wilno (1611), he was ordained in 1622, and appointed preacher in the Church of St. Casimir, Wilno. After making his solemn […]

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Inequalities Are a Condition of Social Organicity

May 12, 2016

[From Leo XIII’s encyclical Humanum genus, of April 20, 1884]: Just as a perfect condition of the body results from the conjunction and composition of its various members, which, though differing in form and purpose, make, by their union and the distribution of each one to its proper place, a combination beautiful to behold, firm […]

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May 10 – Saint Damien: A Hero Who Died on the Battlefield of Honor

May 9, 2016

Born Joseph de Veuster in Tremelo, Belgium, he took the religious name of Damien when he joined the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. There are few places on Earth more beautiful than Hawaii. While this idyllic paradise may be the destination spot for tourists and honeymooners, Joseph de Veuster was eager […]

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