Prince Henry the NavigatorPrince Henry and Prince Edward led their troops through the Almina gate of Ceuta and clattered into the narrow twisting streets. The king’s forces, meanwhile, were invading from the west. Sala-ben-Sala had bolted, taking with him a few other chiefs, their families, and whatever valuables they could hurriedly scrape together….

Prince Henry, having been separated from his troops in the maze of Muslim streets, was presumed dead. When the sad news was relayed to King John, he accepted it stoically, saying, “Such is the end that soldiers must expect.”

The Prince, however, was far from dead and approaching the outer walls of the castle. It was here that his old tutor, Garcia Moniz, found him, bloody, dusty, but exhilarated and determined to take the castle single-handed. “My Prince,” the teacher said, “you attempt feats which are beyond the power of man.” An astute appraisal and, as it turned out, a prophetic one as well.

Henry the Navigator in the Battle of Ceuta. Infante Henry was 21 when he, his father and brothers captured the Moorish port of Ceuta in northern Morocco, that had long been a base for Barbary pirates who raided the Portuguese coast, depopulating villages by capturing their inhabitants to be sold in the African slave market. Photo by Beria

Henry the Navigator in the Battle of Ceuta. Infante Henry was 21 when he, his father and brothers captured the Moorish port of Ceuta in northern Morocco, that had long been a base for Barbary pirates who raided the Portuguese coast, depopulating villages by capturing their inhabitants to be sold in the African slave market. Photo by Beria

Now that the enemy had been won, the Portuguese troops turned to plunder, ransacking abandoned houses…

Prince Henry had no interest in the spoils of war, but hastened to his father to deliver his report. Jubilant upon seeing his son alive, King John embraced him fondly, saying, “I will knight you first, before your brothers.”

 John I of Portugal, King of Portugal and the Algarve & father of Prince Henry the Navigator.

John I of Portugal, King of Portugal and the Algarve & father of Prince Henry the Navigator.

But Prince Henry held back, showing once more a wisdom beyond his years. “God brought us into the world one after the other, my father. I beg you, let the honor of knighthood go in the same succession.”

And so it did. On the first Sunday after the battle was won, in the newly consecrated mosque, the three princes of Portugal received knighthood, dubbed with the swords their mother had had especially prepared for the occasion.

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Jean Anderson, Henry the Navigator Prince of Portugal (Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1969), 47-8.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 511

 

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Kaiserin Zita of Austria visiting a Romanian field hospital, 1758 Romania.

Empress Zita of Austria visiting a Romanian field hospital, 1758 Romania.

All these are attitudes show a great profundity of soul; because in order to understand all this and proceed in this fashion, a soul must be very profound. Very profound does not necessarily mean very intelligent. A knight is not necessarily a philosopher, but he has a clear and profound vision of things whereby he perceives that if such thing is like this and that, then the consequence is that or the other. He is very logical, very consistent, and very strong. He is afraid of consequences. He draws all the consequences for himself and for others, cost what it may and be it as it may.

church

Police salute during the funeral service of fallen officer Vu Nguyen at the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament.

Because of this, the knight loves sublimity. He likes to reflect and to ponder things from their highest aspects; he prefers serious, elevated, noble subjects to trite, commonplace and trivial things. For example, placed before a monument, he tries to perceive the sublimity of that monument. Placed before a church tower, he looks for the sublimity of that tower. Placed before a medieval suit of armor, he looks for the sublimity of that armor; for his whole soul is turned toward adoration and therefore he likes everything that is elevated and sublime, and despises everything that is banal, ordinary and unimportant. These are some traits of the knight’s soul.

A monstrance which was at the National Eucharistic Congress of 1942 in São Paulo, Brazil. On display at the Museum of Sacred Art of São Paulo.

A monstrance which was at the National Eucharistic Congress of 1942 in São Paulo, Brazil. On display at the Museum of Sacred Art of São Paulo.

These traits explain his courage. For a man only has the courage to sacrifice his life in one shot (and at times it is not to sacrifice his life but to become a crippled invalid for the rest of his life) if he understands well the high purpose for which he fights and if he is capable of a continuous and proactive love of that purpose. Without that he will not be courageous during battle.

Jean-Marie Caujolle was one of the first French soldiers to be wounded during World War One. Both his legs were blown off by a shell at Champagne.

Jean-Marie Caujolle was one of the first French soldiers to be wounded during World War One. Both his legs were blown off by a shell at Champagne.

(Excerpt from a Chá of Tuesday, October 3, 1989.)

(Nobility.org translation.)

 

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Tadeusz Kosciuszko

General Thaddeus Kosciuszko statue, 18th & Benjamin Franklin Parkway, in Philadelphia. A gift to Polish Americans from the People of Poland.

General Thaddeus Kosciuszko statue, 18th & Benjamin Franklin Parkway, in Philadelphia. A gift to Polish Americans from the People of Poland.

Polish patriot and soldier, b. near Novogrudok, Lithuania, Poland, 12 February, 1752; d. at Solothurn, Switzerland, 15 October, 1817. He was educated at the military schools of Warsaw and Versailles, and attained the rank of captain in the Polish army. When the American Revolution broke out he embarked for the scene of conflict and, joining Washington’s army, received a commission as officer of engineers, 18 October, 1776. He served with distinction through the war, was made a brigadier general, and was voted the thanks of Congress. He then returned to Poland and lived for several years in retirement. In 1789, when the Polish army was reorganized, he was appointed a major-general and fought gallantly under Prince Poniatowski against the Russians. At the second partition of Poland, he resigned his commission and went to live in Leipzig. He headed the abortive revolution of Poland in 1794, and was wounded and captured by the Russians at the battle of Maciejowice, 10 October.

Tadeusz Kosciuszko

Imprisoned for two years, he was liberated by Emperor Paul on parole and with many marks of esteem. Thereafter his life was passed in retirement. In 1797 he revisited the United States, receiving everywhere great honor and distinction. Congress voted him a grant of land and an addition to his pension. On his return to Europe he took up his residence near Paris, spending his time in agricultural pursuits. In 1806 Napoleon wished him to join in the invasion of Poland, but he felt bound by his parole to Russia and refused. He went to live in Switzerland in 1816, making his home at Solothurn, where he was killed by a fall from a horse. His remains, by direction of the Emperor Alexander, were taken to Krakow, where they were interred with solemn pomp in the cathedral near the tombs of Poniatowski and Sobieski. A mound 150 feet high, made of earth taken from every battle-field in Poland, was piled up in his honor in the outskirts of the city.

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HASSARD, Hist. of U. S. (New York), GRIFFIN in Am. Cath. Hist. Researches (Philadelphia, April, 1910); MICHELET, Pologne et Russie, legende de Kosciuszko (Paris, 1851); IDEM, La Pologne martyre (1863); FALKENSTEIN, Kosciuszko (Leipzig, 1827); RYCHLICKI, Kosciuszko and the Partition of Poland (Krakow, 1872); CHODZKO, Histoire militaire, politique et privee de Kosciuszko (Paris, 1837).

THOMAS F. MEEHAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Saint Eulalia of Barcelona

Santa EulàliaA Spanish martyr in the persecution of Diocletian (February 12, 304), patron of the cathedral and city of Barcelona, also of sailors. The Acts of her life and martyrdom were copied early in the twelfth century, and with elegant conciseness, by the learned ecclesiastic Renallus Grammaticus (Bol. acad. hist., Madrid, 1902, XLI, 253-55). Their chief historical source is a Latin hymn of the middle of the seventh century by Quiricus, Bishop of Barcelona, friend and correspondent of St. Ildephonsus of Toledo and of Tajo, Bishop of Saragossa. This hymn, identical with that of Prudentius (Peristephanon, III) for the feast of St. Eulalia of Merida (December 10, 304), was preserved in the Visigothic Church and has reached us through the Mozarabic Liturgy.

The tomb of St. Eulàlia in Barcelona Cathedral. Photo by  Xavier Caballé.

The tomb of St. Eulàlia in Barcelona Cathedral. Photo by Xavier Caballé.

There is no reason to doubt the existence of two distinct saints of this name, despite the over-hasty and hypercritical doubts of some. The aforesaid Quiricus of Barcelona and Oroncius of Merida were present at the tenth council of Toledo (656). The latter had already founded (651) a convent of nuns close by the basilica of the celebrated martyr of his episcopal city, had written a rule for its guidance, and given it for abbess the noble lady Eugenia. Quiricus now did as much for the basilica and sepulchre of the martyr of Barcelona, close to whom he wished to be buried, as we read in the last lines of the hymn. The inscriptions on many Visigothic altars show that they contained relics of St. Eulalia; except in the context, however, they do not distinguish between the martyr of Barcelona and the one of Merida. On an altar in the village of Morera, Province of Badajoz, we find enumerated consecutively Sts. Fructuosus and Augurius (Tarragona), St. Eulalia (Barcelona), St. Baudilius (Nimes), and St. Paulus (Narbonne). The Visigothic archaeology of Eastern Spain has been hitherto poor in hagiological remains; nevertheless, a trans-Pyrenean inscription found at Montady near Beziers mentions a basilica dedicated to the martyrs Sts. Vincentius, Ines, and Eulalia (of Barcelona). Until November 23, 874, the body of the Barcelona martyr reposed outside the walls of the city in the church of Santa Maria del March On that date both the body and the tomb were transferred to his cathedral by Bishop Frodoinus. In memory of this act he set up an inscription yet preserved in the Muséo Provincial of Barcelona (no. 864); see also volume XX of Florez, “España Sagrada”, for a reproduction of the same. Not long before this the martyr, St. Eulogius, having occasion to defend the martyrs of Cordova for their spontaneous confession of the Christian Faith before the Mussulman magistrates, quoted the example of St. Eulalia of Barcelona, and referred to the ancient Acts of her martyrdom. Her distinct personality is also confirmed by the existence of an ancient church and monastery in Cordova that bear the name of the Barcelona martyr; this important evidence is borne out by the Mozarabic calendars examined by the learned Dom Ferotin (below).

F. FITA

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February 12 – St. Frideswide

February 11, 2016

St. Frideswide

(FRIDESWIDA, FREDESWIDA, Fr. FRÉVISSE, Old Eng. FRIS).

Stained glass window of Saint Frideswide hides from King Algar amongst swines.

Stained glass window of Saint Frideswide hides from King Algar amongst swines.

Virgin, patroness of Oxford, lived from about 650 to 735. According to her legend, in its latest form, she was the child of King Didan and Safrida, and was brought up to holiness by Algiva. She refused the proffered hand of King Algar, a Mercian, and fled from him to Oxford. It was in vain that he pursued her; a mysterious blindness fell on him, and he left her in her cell. From this eventually developed the monastery, in which she died in 19 October (her principal feast), and was buried. The earliest written life now extant was not composed until four hundred years after her death, but it is generally admitted that the substance of the tradition has every appearance of verisimilitude. From the time of her translation in 1180 (commemorated 12 Feb.) from her original tomb to the great shrine of her church, her fame spread far and wide; for the university was now visited by students from all parts, who went twice a year in solemn procession to her shrine and kept her feasts with great solemnity. Cardinal Wolsey transformed her monastery into Christ Church College, King Henry made her church into Oxford cathedral, but her shrine was dismantled, and her relics, which seem to have been preserved, were relegated to some out-of-the-way corner. In the reign of Edward VI, Catherine Cathie was buried near the site of her shrine. She was a runaway nun, who had been through the form of marriage with Peter Martyr, the ex-friar. The Catholics, as was but natural, ejected her bones in the reign of Queen Mary. But after Elizabeth had reinstated Protestantism, James Calfhill, appointed Canon of Christ Church in 1561, dug up Cathie’s bones once more, mixed them up (in derision of the Catholics) with the alleged remaining relics of the saint, and buried them both together amid the plaudits of his Zwinglian friends in England and Germany, where two relations of his exploit, one in Latin and one in German, were published in 1562. The Latin relation, which is conveniently reprinted in the Bollandists, is followed in the original by a number of epitaphs on the theme Hic jacet religio cum superstitione, but it does not seem that these words were incised on the tomb, though it is often said that they were. The episode strikingly illustrates the character of the continuity between the ancient faith and the reformed religion of England.

Acta SS., Oct., VIII, 533-564; MABILLON, Acta SS. Ben. (1672), III, I, 561; HOLE in Dict. Christ. Biog., s. v.; HUBERT, Historia Bucerii, Fagii, item C. Vermiliæ (1562); PARKER, Early Oxford, 727-1100 (1885); PLUMMER, Elizabethan Oxford (1887).

J.H. POLLEN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Catherine de Ricci, Virgin

(AD 1522 – 1589)

Fiammetta da Diacceto, St. Catherine and her brothers.

Fiammetta da Diacceto, St. Catherine and her brothers.

The Ricci are an ancient family, which still subsists in a flourishing condition in Tuscany. Peter de Ricci, the father of our saint, was married to Catherine Bonza, a lady of suitable birth. The saint was born at Florence in 1522, and called at her baptism Alexandrina, but she took the name of Catherine at her religious profession. Having lost her mother in her infancy, she was…

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February 13 – St. Fulcran

February 11, 2016

St. Fulcran

One of the many miracles by St. Fulcran. Painting by François Matet.

Bishop of Lodève; died 13 February, 1006. According to the biography which Bernard Guidonis, Bishop of Lodève (died 1331), has left us his saintly predecessor, Fulcran came of a distinguished family, consecrated himself at an early age to the service of the Church, became a priest, and from his youth led a pure and holy life. When in 949 Theoderich…

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Sts. Cyril and Methodius

Saints Cyril and Methodius

These brothers, the Apostles of the Slavs, were born in Thessalonica, in 827 and 826 respectively. Though belonging to a senatorial family they renounced secular honors and became priests. They were living in a monastery on the Bosphorus, when the Khazars sent to Constantinople for a Christian teacher. Cyril was selected and was accompanied by his brother. They learned the Khazar language and converted many of the people. Soon after the Khazar mission there was a request from the Moravians for a preacher of the Gospel. German missionaries had already labored among them, but without success. The Moravians wished a teacher who could instruct them and conduct Divine service in the Slavonic tongue. On account of their acquaintance with the language, Cyril and Methodius were chosen for their work. In preparation for it Cyril invented an alphabet…

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St. Claude de la Colombière

St. Claude de la ColombiereMissionary and ascetical writer, born of noble parentage at Saint-Symphorien-d’Ozon, between Lyons and Vienne, in 1641; died at Paray-le-Monial, 15 Feb., 1682. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1659. After fifteen years of religious life he made a vow, as a means of attaining the utmost possible perfection, to observe faithfully the rule and constitutions of his order under penalty of sin. Those who lived with him attested that this vow was kept with great exactitude. In 1674 Father de la Colombière was made superior at the Jesuit house at…

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But will these annals be like a closed book? Will they count only the memories of a past dead and gone? No. On the contrary, they must be a message from the vanished generations to those of the future.

With all Our heart We extend Our paternal greeting to the members of the Roman Patriciate and Nobility who, true to an ancient tradition, have gathered around Us at the dawn of the New Year to offer Us their fervent best wishes, as expressed with filial devotion by their illustrious and eloquent representative.

One after another, each year enters history, handing…

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St. Ansbert

Archbishop of Rouen in 695, Confessor

St. Ansbert de Rouen

He had been chancelor to King Clotair III in which station he had united the mortification and recollection of a monk with the duties of wedlock, and of a statesman. Quitting the court, he put on the monastic habit at Fontenelle under St. Wandregisile, and when that holy founder’s immediate successor St. Lantbert was made bishop of Lyons, Ansbert was appointed abbot of that famous monastery. He was confessor to King Theodoric III and with his consent was chosen archbishop of Rouen, upon the death of St. Owen in 683. By his care, good order, learning, and piety flourished in his diocese; nevertheless Pepin, mayor of the palace, banished him, upon a false accusation, to the monastery of Aumont, upon the Sambre in Hainault, where he died in the year 698.

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See Mab. Sæc. 2. Ben. and Annal. l. 18. Rivet, Hist. Litter. t. 4. p. 33. and t. 3. p. 646. Henschenius, Feb. t. 2. p. 342.

The Lives of the Saints, by Rev. Alban Butler, 1866. Volume II: February. p. 390.

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Bl. Aloysius Stepinac

BL. ALOJZIJE STEPINAC was born into a large Catholic family on 8 May 1898 in Krasic. After graduation from high school in 1916, he completed military service during World War I. In 1924 he decided to study for the priesthood and was sent to Rome, where he attended the Pontifical Germanicum-Hungaricum College. He earned doctorates in theology and philosophy at the Pontifical Gregorian University and was ordained on 26 October 1930…

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St. Scholastica, Virgin

(c. 480 – 10 February 547)

This saint was sister to the great St. Benedict. She consecrated herself to God from her earliest youth, as St. Gregory testifies. Where her first monastery was situated is not mentioned; but after her brother removed to Mount Cassino, she choose her retreat at Plombariola, in that neighbourhood, where she founded and governed a nunnery about five miles distant to the south from St. Benedict’s…

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Blessed Pope Gregory X

Born 1210; died 10 January, 1276. Pope Gregory X was declared Blessed on July 8, 1713 by Pope Clement XI.

Pope Gregory XThe death of Pope Clement IV (29 November, 1268) left the Holy See vacant for almost three years. The cardinals assembled at Viterbo were divided into two camps, the one French and the other Italian. Neither of these parties could poll the two-thirds majority vote, nor was either willing to give way to the other for the election of a candidate to the papacy…

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St. Benedict of Aniane

Saint Benedict of AnianeBorn about 745-750; died at Cornelimünster, 11 February, 821. Benedict, originally known as Witiza, son of the Goth, Aigulf, Count of Maguelone in Southern France, was educated at the Frankish court of Pepin, and entered the royal service. He took part in the Italian campaign of Charlemagne (773), after which he left his royal master to enter the religious life, and was received into the monastery of St. Sequanus (Saint-Seine). He gave himself most zealously to practices of asceticism, and learned to value the Rule of St. Benedict as the best foundation for the monastic life. Returning home in 779, he established on his own land near the little river of Aniane a new monastic settlement, which soon developed into a great monastery, under the name of Aniane, and became the model and centre of the monastic reform in France, introduced by Louis the Pious. The emperor’s chief adviser was Benedict, and the general adoption of the Rule of St. Benedict in the monasteries of the Empire was the most important step towards the reform. Benedict took a prominent part in the synods held in Aachen in 816 and 817, the results of which were embodied in the important prescriptions for the restoration of monastic discipline, dated 10 July, 817; he was the enthusiastic leader of these assemblies, and he himself reformed many monasteries on the lines laid down in the ordinances promulgated there. In order to have him in the vicinity of his royal residence, Louis had founded on the Inde, a stream near Aachen, the Abbey of Cornelimünster, which was to be an exemplar for all other abbeys, and to be under the guidance of Benedict. In the dogmatic controversy over Adoptionism, under the leadership of Felix of Urgel, Benedict took the part of orthodoxy. To promote the monastic reforms, he compiled a collection of monastic rules. A pupil of his, the monk Ardo, wrote a biography of the great abbot.

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For Benedict’s writings, see Codex regularum monasticarum et canonicarum in P.L., CIII, 393-702; Concordia regularum, loc. cit; Letters, loc. cit., 703-1380. Other treatises (loc. cit., 1381 sqq.) ascribed to him are probably not authentic. ARDO SMARAGDUS, Life, op. cit., CIII, 353 sqq.; Mon. Germ. Hist.: Script., XV, I, 200-220; Acta SS., Feb., II, 606 sqq.; NICOLAI, Der hl. Benedict, Gründer von Aniane und Cornelimünster (Cologne, 1865); PAULINIER, S. Benoit d’Aniane et la fondation du monastere de ce nom (Montpellier, 1871); FOSS, Benedikt von Aniane (Berlin, 1884); PUCKERT, Aniane und Gellone (Leipzig, 1899); HAUCK, Kirchengesch. Deutschlands (2nd ed., Leipzig, 1900), II, 575 sqq.; BUTLER, Lives of the Saints, 12 Feb.

J.P. KIRSCH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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You find yourselves gathered around Us here today at the dawn of the year marking the division between the two halves of the twentieth century, a Jubilee Year inaugurated with the opening of the Holy Door.Pope Pius XII Opening the Holy Doors (Porta Santa) during the Jubilee Year

You find yourselves gathered around Us here today at the dawn of the year marking the division between the two halves of the twentieth century, a Jubilee Year inaugurated with the opening of the Holy Door.
If, dear Sons and Daughters, following the example of Our Predecessors, We are accustomed to welcoming you at the start of the New Year to receive and exchange our good wishes, it is because Our heart, far from obeying worldly considerations or preferences, is moved by feelings of honor and loyalty.  In you We hail the descendants and representatives of families long in the service of the Holy See and the Vicar of Christ, who remained faithful to the Roman Pontificate even when it was exposed to outrages and persecutions.

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According to The Telegraph:

[T]he Australian Republic Movement (ARM), …add their voices to that of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, himself a former head of ARM. The political stars, in other words, seem aligned for a new plebiscite.

Except for one small detail: the sure and settled will of the people. Mr Turnbull skirts this by saying there are other more important issues at present. So while he might agitate for another referendum, he won’t stake his career on it. The reason is obvious – ….he knows he would lose. Again.

To read the entire article in The Telegraph, please click here.

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According to The Crown Chronicles:

A favourite tipple of The Duke of Edinburgh’s has been revamped after decades off the shelf – and Prince Philip is delighted.

The Duke’s favourite beer was Double Diamond, an ale, but production was stopped in the 1990s. Now, a brewery in Burton-on-Trent – home of lager Carling – has created a tribute version of the drink, called Dual Diamond. Letters were exchanged and Philip has asked the company for a sample.

Philip’s private secretary wrote in a letter to the company…“May I suggest that you arrange for the beer to be sent to Buckingham Palace…”

To read the entire article in The Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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Rodrigo Diaz de VivarRodrigo died at Valencia…. After his death his sorrowing wife remained in Valencia with a great company of knights and footsoldiers. When the news of his death spread all the Saracens who lived across the seas mustered a considerable army and marched against Valencia. They laid siege to it on all sides and attacked the city for seven months.

Doña Jimena Díaz, wife of El Cid

Doña Jimena Díaz, wife of El Cid

His wife, deprived of so great a husband, finding herself in her affliction so hard-pressed and unable to find the remedy of consolation in her unhappiness, sent the bishop of the city to King Alfonso ask him for pity’s sake to help her. On receiving this appeal the king came swiftly to Valencia with his army. Rodrigo’s unhappy wife received him with the greatest joy, and kissed his feet.

Alfonso VI of Castile

Alfonso VI of Castile

She implored him to help her and all the Christians who were with her. But the king could find no one among his men who might hold the city and defend it from the Saracens; for it was far removed from his kingdom. So he returned to Castile, taking with him Rodrigo’s wife with the body of her husband, and all the Christians who were then there, with their household goods and riches. When they had all left Valencia the king ordered the whole city to be burnt: then he led all these people to Toledo. The Saracens, who had fled [at] the king’s arrival and abandoned the siege, re-entered the city soon after the king’s departure, although it was burnt, and resettled it and all its territories….

Photo of the tombs of El Cid and Doña Jimena in the Monastery o San Pedro of Cardeña, by Jose Luis Filpo Cabana.

Photo of the tombs of El Cid and Doña Jimena in the Monastery o San Pedro of Cardeña, by Jose Luis Filpo Cabana.

Rodrigo’s wife, accompanied by her husband’s knights, bore his body to the monastery of San Pedro de Cardeña. There she gave it honorable burial, granting for the sake of his soul no small gifts to the monastery.

 

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Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher, The World of El Cid: Chronicles of the Spanish Reconquest (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000), 146-7.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 510

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Blessed Emperor Karl and Empress Zita of Austria in the field attending Mass at the Train Station.

Blessed Emperor Karl and Empress Zita of Austria in the field attending Mass at the Train Station.

[T]his spirit of chivalry is an elevated spirit that always strives to have in mind the consideration of one’s own dignity, the consideration of the Christian and Catholic order of things that must be respected, and which, for this very reason takes into account first and foremost the rights of God. The knight practices his Faith fearlessly; not only with all naturalness but in a way that shows his manliness. And if someone mocks or laughs him, they will be in trouble. This is part of the spirit of chivalry.

Father (Major) Edward J. Waters, just concluding Mass on a pier for members of the first assault troops thrown against Hitler's forces on the continent.

Troops attend Mass before amphibious assault.

But the thing goes higher. The knight places in this love of God an exact knowledge of who God is in His infiniteness, glory, grandeur, splendor, goodness, mercy, and for this reason he has a devout and profound admiration for God, a devout and profound respect whereby even if he is alone in his room, when he has to move a little statue or pick up a rosary he accidentally dropped he does it with extreme respect.

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(Excerpt from a Chá of Tuesday, October 3, 1989.)

(Nobility.org translation.)

 

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February 5 – Patroness of Nurses

February 4, 2016

St. Agatha One of the most highly venerated virgin martyrs of Christian antiquity, put to death for her steadfast profession of faith in Catania, Sicily. Although it is uncertain in which persecution this took place, we may accept, as probably based on ancient tradition, the evidence of her legendary life, composed at a later date, […]

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February 5 – He put the Bible to verse and prose

February 4, 2016

St. Avitus (Alcimus Ecdicius). A distinguished bishop of Vienne, in Gaul, from 490 to about 518, though his death is place by some as late as 525 or 526. He was born of a prominent Gallo-Roman family closely related to the Emperor Avitus and other illustrious persons, and in which episcopal honors were hereditary. In […]

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February 5 – St. Adelaide of Cologne

February 4, 2016

St. Adelaide (of Cologne) Abbess, born in the tenth century; died at Cologne, 5 February, 1015. She was daughter of Megingoz, Count of Guelders, and when still very young entered the convent of St. Ursula in Cologne, where the Rule of St. Jerome was followed. When her parents founded the convent of Villich, opposite the […]

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February 6 – Apostle of Flanders

February 4, 2016

St. Amandus One of the great apostles of Flanders; born near Nantes, in France, about the end of the sixth century. He was, apparently, of noble extraction. When a youth of twenty, he fled from his home and became a monk near Tours, resisting all the efforts of his family to withdraw him from his […]

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February 7 – Refused admission to the Pontifical Noble Guard, he became Pope instead

February 4, 2016

Pope Blessed Pius IX (GIOVANNI MARIA MASTAI-FERRETTI). Pope from 1846-78; born at Sinigaglia, 13 May, 1792; died in Rome, 7 February, 1878. BEFORE HIS PAPACY His early years. After receiving his classical education at the Piarist College in Volterra from 1802-09 he went to Rome to study philosophy and theology, but left there in 1810 […]

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February 7 – Saintly King, and Father of Three More Saints

February 4, 2016

St. Richard, King and Confessor This saint was an English prince, in the kingdom of the West-Saxons, and was perhaps deprived of his inheritance by some revolution in the state: or he renounced it to be more at liberty to dedicate himself to the pursuit of Christian perfection. His three children, Winebald, Willibald, and Warburg… […]

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February 8 – Mary Queen of Scots

February 4, 2016

Mary Queen of Scots Mary Stuart, born at Linlithgow, 8 December, 1542; died at Fotheringay, 8 February, 1587. She was the only legitimate child of James V of Scotland. His death (14 December) followed immediately after her birth, and she became queen when only six days old. The Tudors endeavored by war to force on […]

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February 8 – A strong and mighty Angel – calm, terrible, and bright – the cross in blended red and blue, upon his mantle white

February 4, 2016

Saint John of Matha Founder of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity. He was born into Provencal nobility in 1154 at Faucon-de-Barcelonnette, France. As a youth, he was educated at Aix-en-Provence, and later studied theology at the University of Paris. While in Paris, he was urged by a vision during his first Mass to […]

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Pius XII: Allocution of January 15, 1949

February 4, 2016

We remind you of the fundamental and immutable duties, in all their variety and multiple aspects, imposed upon you by your station in society. Last year We delineated them for you with the brevity required by the circumstances. We do not doubt that, in examining your conscience, you have asked yourselves with what loyalty and […]

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February 2 – “Though in chains, he is as gay as a little bird”

February 1, 2016

St. Théophane Vénard (JEAN-THÉOPHANE VÉNARD.) French missionary, born at St-Loup, Diocese of Poitiers, 1829; martyred in Tonkin, 2 February, 1861. He studied at the College of Doue-la-Fontaine, Montmorillon, Poitiers, and at the Paris Seminary for Foreign Missions which he entered as a sub-deacon. Ordained priest 5 June, 1852, he departed for the Far East, 19 […]

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February 2 – He hastened to the king, exhibited his wounded body and related his vision

February 1, 2016

St. Lawrence Second Archbishop of Canterbury, d. 2 Feb., 619. For the particulars of his life and pontificate we rely exclusively on details added by medieval writers being unsupported by historical evidence, though they may possibly embody ancient traditions. According to St. Bede, he was one of the original missionaries who left Rome with St. […]

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February 3 – The Stuff of Which Saints Are Made

February 1, 2016

St. Anschar (Or Saint Ansgar, Anskar or Oscar.) Called the Apostle of the North, was born to the French nobility in Picardy, 8 September, 801; died 5 February, 865. He became a Benedictine of Corbie, whence he passed into Westphalia. With Harold, the newly baptized King of Denmark who had been expelled from his kingdom […]

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February 3 – Half Fierce Pagan Princess, Half Gentle Christian Princess

February 1, 2016

St. Werburgh of Chester (WEREBURGA, WEREBURG, VERBOURG). Benedictine, patroness of Chester, Abbess of Weedon, Trentham, Hanbury, Minster in Sheppy, and Ely, born in Staffordshire early in the seventh century; died at Trentham, 3 February, 699 or 700. Her mother was St. Ermenilda, daughter of Ercombert, King of Kent, and St. Sexburga, and her father, Wulfhere, […]

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February 4 – Daughter of one king and wife of another

February 1, 2016

St. Jeanne de Valois Queen and foundress of the Order of the Annonciades, b. 1464; d. at Bourges, 4 Feb., 1505. Daughter of one king and wife of another, there are perhaps few saints in the calendar who suffered greater or more bitter humiliations than did Madame Jeanne de France, the heroic woman usually known […]

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February 4 – Portuguese noble and favorite of the king, he strove to convert the nobility of India – and paid for it with his life

February 1, 2016

St. John de Brito Martyr, born in Lisbon, 1 March, 1647, and was brought up at Court, martyred in India 11 February, 1693. Entering the Society of Jesus at fifteen, he obtained as his mission-field Madura in southern India. In September, 1673, he reached Goa. Before taking up his work he spent thirty days in […]

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February 4 – Wild and dissolute, but then he heard this!

February 1, 2016

St. Andrew Corsini Of the illustrious Corsini family; born in Florence, in 1302; died 1373. Wild and dissolute in youth, he was startled by the words of his mother about what had happened to her before his birth, and, becoming a Carmelite monk in his native city, began a life of great mortification. He studied […]

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February 4 – Sent into Muslim lands, he sought to preach to the Sultan

February 1, 2016

St. Joseph of Leonessa In the world named Eufranio Desiderio, born in 1556 at Leonessa in Umbria; died 4 February, 1612. From his infancy he showed a remarkably religious bent of mind; he used to erect little altars and spend much time in prayer before them, and often he would gather his companions and induce […]

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February 4 – Probably the most learned man of his age

February 1, 2016

Blessed Maurus Magnentius Rabanus (Hrabanus, Rhabanus) Abbot of Fulda, Archbishop of Mainz, celebrated theological and pedagogical writer of the ninth century, born at Mainz about 776 (784?); died at Winkel (Vinicellum) near Mainz on 4 February, 856. He took vows at an early age in the Benedictine monastery of Fulda, and was ordained deacon in […]

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February 4 – Patron of Armenia

February 1, 2016

Gregory the Illuminator Born 257?; died 337?, surnamed the Illuminator (Lusavorich). Gregory the Illuminator is the apostle, national saint, and patron of Armenia. He was not the first who introduced Christianity into that country. The Armenians maintain that the faith was preached there by the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddaeus. Thaddaeus especially (the hero of the […]

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February 4 – Pope Gregory V

February 1, 2016

Pope Gregory V Born c. 970; died 4 February, 999. On the death of John XV the Romans sent a deputation to Otto III and asked him to name the one he would wish them to elect in the place of the deceased pontiff. He at once mentioned his chaplain and relation, Bruno, the son […]

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Pius XII: Allocution of January 14, 1948

February 1, 2016

Although the present difficult circumstances have advised Us this year to give your traditional audience an external form different from the custom, neither the reception of your homages and vows nor the expression of Our best wishes for you and your families has lost any of their intimate value and profound significance. Just as the […]

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Norway Celebrates King Harald’s Silver Jubilee

January 28, 2016

According to The Royal Forums: The day began with a church service in the Palace Chapel, which the entire royal family attended, as did their guests from overseas: Queen Margrethe II of Denmark and King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden. The royal family appeared on the Palace balcony to thank the gathered […]

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England Will Debate Anthem to Rival ‘God Save the Queen’

January 28, 2016

According to The New York Times: “God Save the Queen”…the anthem, and not just the sovereign, may be in need of saving. On Wednesday, lawmakers agreed to debate in March a bill that, while not scrapping “God Save the Queen,” would create another anthem to be played before England’s teams take on foreign rivals. …Toby […]

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How The Death Of A Queen Led To 68,000 People Being Fed

January 28, 2016

By Medievalists.net The death of a medieval queen was often an occasion for great sorrow throughout their own country – even more so when the lady was very popular among the people. Such was the case when Matilda, the wife of King Henry I, passed away in the year 1118. Over an eight-day period commemorations […]

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No One Fools Around With a Knight

January 28, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira For this very reason the man is a knight in the drawing room, amiable but distinguished, making it understood that you don’t play around with him. The knight is serious. The knight is not a joker. He is habitually serious and kind, but he does not fool around and no […]

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January 29 – Noble enough to cover five contemporary kings with invective

January 28, 2016

St. Gildas Surnamed the Wise; born about 516; died at Houat, Brittany, 570. Sometimes he is called “Badonicus” because, as he tells us, his birth took place the year the Britons gained a famous victory over the Saxons at Mount Badon, near Bath, Somersetshire (493 or 516). The biographies of Gildas exist — one written… […]

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January 30 – Cured in body and in soul

January 28, 2016

St. Hyacintha Mariscotti A religious of the Third Order of St. Francis and foundress of the Sacconi; born 1585 of a noble family at Vignanello, near Viterbo in Italy; died 30 January, 1640, at Viterbo; feast, 30 January; in Rome, 6 February (Diarium Romanum). Her parents were Marc’ Antonio Mariscotti (Marius Scotus) and Ottavia Orsini. […]

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January 30 – St. Martina

January 28, 2016

St. Martina Statue of St. Martina at the Basilica of St. Martina in Martina Franca, Italy. Roman virgin, martyred in 226, according to some authorities, more probably in 228, under the pontificate of Pope Urban I, according to others. The daughter of an ex-consul and left an orphan at an early age, she so openly […]

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January 31 – St. John Bosco Meets His First Noble Patroness

January 28, 2016

Juliette Colbert, a native of Vendée, had married Marquis Tancredi Falletti of Barolo, and of her it could be said, even as we read of Tabitha in the Acts of the Apostles: “This woman had devoted herself to good works and acts of charity… Read more here.

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January 31 – The Glory of the Ladies

January 28, 2016

St. Marcella (325–410)  She was a Christian ascetic in ancient Rome. Growing up in Rome, she was influenced by her pious mother, Albina, an educated woman of wealth and benevolence. Childhood memories centered around piety, and one in particular related to Athanasius, who lodged in her home during one of his many exiles. He may […]

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February 1 – She and Saint Patrick were “one heart and one mind”

January 28, 2016

Saint Brigid of Ireland Born in 451 or 452 of princely ancestors at Faughart, near Dundalk, County Louth; d. 1 February, 525, at Kildare. Refusing many good offers of marriage, she became a nun and received the veil from St. Macaille. With seven other virgins she settled for a time at the foot of Croghan […]

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February 1 – Immediately after his martyrdom, they lined up to venerate his relics

January 28, 2016

St. Henry Morse Martyr; born in 1595 in Norfolk; died at Tyburn, 1 Feb., 1644. He was received into the church at Douai, 5 June, 1614, after various journeys was ordained at Rome, and left for the mission, 19 June, 1624. He was admitted to the Society of Jesus at Heaton; there he was arrested […]

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Pius XII: Allocution of January 8, 1947

January 28, 2016

The homage of your loyalty and devotion, and the wishes of good tidings which you, beloved Sons and Daughters, come to offer Us each year by ancient custom, and which have been so beautifully expressed by your most excellent representative, always fill Our heart with sincere gratitude. Naturally, they usually reflect the thoughts and worries […]

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January 26 – She was from one of the first families of Rome

January 25, 2016

St. Paula Born in Rome, 347; died at Bethlehem, 404. She belonged to one of the first families of Rome. Left a widow in 379 at the age of 32 she became, through the influence of St. Marcella and her group, the model of Christian widows. In 382 took place her decisive meeting with St. […]

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January 27 – Foundress of the Ursulines

January 25, 2016

St. Angela Merici Foundress of the Ursulines, born 21 March, 1474, at Desenzano, a small town on the southwestern shore of Lake Garda in Lombardy; died 27 January, 1540, at Brescia. She was left an orphan at the age of ten and together with her elder sister came to the home of her uncle at […]

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January 28 – Great in every sense

January 25, 2016

Charlemagne (French for Charles the Great, Carolus Magnus, or Carlus Magnus; German Karl der Grosse). The name given by later generations to Charles, King of the Franks, first sovereign of the Christian Empire of the West; born 2 April, 742; died at Aachen, 28 January, 814. At the time of Charles’ birth, his father, Pepin […]

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January 28 – Angelic Doctor, Count

January 25, 2016

St. Thomas Aquinas Saint Thomas Aquinas “sets forth the three conditions that legitimize in conscience the use of armed force.” Philosopher, theologian, doctor of the Church (Angelicus Doctor), patron of Catholic universities, colleges, and schools. Born at Rocca Secca in the Kingdom of Naples, 1225 or 1227; died at Fossa Nuova, 7 March, 1274… Read […]

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January 28 – St. Paulinus II, Patriarch of Aquileia

January 25, 2016

St. Paulinus II, Patriarch of Aquileia Born at Premariacco, near Cividale, Italy, about 730-40; died 802. Born probably of a Roman family during Longobardic rule in Italy, he was brought up in the patriarchal schools at Cividale. After ordination he became master of the school. He acquired a thorough Latin culture, pagan and Christian. He […]

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January 28 – Larochejacquelein killed by the very men whose lives he spared

January 25, 2016

While Turreau was thus devastating La Vendée, where were Larochejacquelein, Stofflet, and Charette? Had they forgotten their country and its cause—were they deaf to her cries of distress? Charette still fought in the depths of the Marais; Stofflet in the recesses of the Bocage; but Larochejacquelein, the young, the brave, the chivalrous, the peasants’ idol […]

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Pope Pius XII: Allocution of January 16, 1946

January 25, 2016

In past years, beloved Sons and Daughters, on this occasion—after having paternally welcomed the wishes that your illustrious representative usually offers Us in your name, with such noble expressions of faith and filial devotion—We usually accompanied Our expressions of thanks with some recommendations suggested by the circumstances of the moment. We spoke to you of […]

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