Isabella the Liberator

January 29, 2015

Closeup photo of San Juan de los Reyes, Toledo, Spain by MRMaeyaert. Hanging from the exterior walls are the manacles and shackles once worn by the Catholics imprisoned by the Muslims.

Closeup photo of San Juan de los Reyes, Toledo, Spain by MRMaeyaert. Hanging from the exterior walls are the manacles and shackles once worn by the Catholics imprisoned by the Muslims.

Queen Isabella of Castile and León—the sponsor of Christopher Columbus’s discovery of the Americas—is known in History as “Isabella the Catholic,” but she could also be seen as “Isabella the Liberator.”

During the ten-year war to reconquer the Kingdom of Granada and reintegrate it into Catholic Spain, she liberated thousands of Catholic captives reduced to the harshest slavery by their Muslim masters. As the virtuous Queen’s troops stormed the walls of city after Muslim city, the dungeons inside disgorged a veritable cross-section of enslaved Castilian society: nobles; ladies; clergy; knights; religious; merchants; peasants; men; women; and children.

A closeup of the manacles and shackles.

A closeup of the manacles and shackles.

All who were captured by the Muslims in their cruel razias were driven like cattle back to the kingdom of Granada and sold as slaves in the open market. Anyone not able to ransom himself or herself was doomed to a life that seemed worse than death. Sadly, and to put an end to their tortures and sufferings, many despaired and apostatized from the Catholic faith, submitting to Islam. The temptation to do this was so strong and the lot of the captives so pitiful, that God had inspired St. Peter Nolasco to found the Mercedarians in 1218—a religious order dedicated to the redemption of captives who were at risk of losing the Faith. While this worthy order had grown immensely and done much good in the following centuries, thousands upon thousands of Catholics still languished in Muslim slavery when the war for the reconquest of Granada started in December 1481.

Photo of the chains and shackles hanging on the facade of San Juan de los Reyes taken by Txispun.

Photo of the chains and shackles hanging on the facade of San Juan de los Reyes taken by Txispun.

For the next ten years, until the fall of the capital city of Granada in January 1492, Christian captives were liberated from slavery with every Spanish victory. Thousands of these Catholic ex-slaves followed the example of the cured Samaritan leper, and made their way to wherever Queen Isabella was to thank the sovereign on their knees for their regained freedom. She commanded her troops to knock off their chains, which she then ordered hung outside the walls of the Monastery of St. John of the Kings, which she built in Toledo in thanksgiving to God for her victory in the wars she was forced to fight to secure her rights to the Crown at the beginning of her illustrious reign. Today, more than 500 years later, many of these ancient chains can still be seen where they were first hung in silent gratitude and tribute to the Crusading heroism and charity of a truly Catholic Queen.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 459

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Photo of the clouds over the Atlantic Ocean in Bahia, Brazil by Tfioreze.

Photo of the clouds over the Atlantic Ocean in Bahia, Brazil by Tfioreze.

One of the primary elements of the sea’s grandeur is its unity. The oceans of the world flow into one another and make up an immense body of water which encircles the entire globe.

Anywhere in the world, when we find ourselves at the edge of the sea, one of the most agreeable spiritual considerations is to embrace visually the entire liquid mass stretching before us to the horizon and to recall that this mass does not end at that boundary. Rather, farther beyond, immensity upon fluid immensity follows, forming a great and single immensity, that is, the sea as a whole, which moves, rolls, and plays about the entire surface of the earth.

Photo of Miami south beach at sunrise by Bjornsphoto.

Photo of Miami south beach at sunrise by Bjornsphoto.

And yet, how much variety is evident in the sea! One moment it is humble and serene, seeming to satisfy our soul’s every desire for peace, tranquility, and quietude. The next moment, it moves itself with discretion and suavity, allowing small waves to form which play upon its surface, bringing a smile to our spirit and allowing it to expand itself in the consideration of the amenable and appreciable realities of life.

Finally, it shows itself majestic and fierce, rising up in sublime movements, with fury hurling itself against lofty crags and emptying its abysses of unfathomable quantities of water.

The Universe is a Cathedral, the end of which is the glorification of God.

At times, the sea comes ashore swiftly and seemingly out of breath. At other times, it heads ashore lazily, by means of waves which die listlessly upon the beach. And finally, it shows itself at times completely void of motion, seemingly to gaze landward without coming ashore.

Photo of the Ocean at Porto Covo on the west coast of Portugal taken by Alvesgaspar.

Photo of the Ocean at Porto Covo on the west coast of Portugal taken by Alvesgaspar.

At times, the sea is so limpid that one is able to gaze through its great liquid mass clear to the bottom. However, at other times, it shows itself obscure, impenetrable, profound, and mysterious.

From one moment to the next, its murmur gives the impression of a soothing caress which induces sleep, and then it seems to be but a noise in the distance, such as that of the voice of an old friend whom one has heard on many occasions. But then, shortly afterwards, it speaks to us with a dominating, regal bellow, seeming to impose its will upon all other elements.

Photo of the Baleineaux Lighthouse in Île de Ré, France taken by per.per.

Photo of the Baleineaux Lighthouse in Île de Ré, France taken by per.per.

***

We would not consider these various aspects of the sea coherent or enchanting were they not presented to us upon the great foundation of a fixed, invariable, and grandiose unity.

The sea is the garden of a palace of dreams.

The sea in its myriad forms and noises! In its magnificent furies and splendorous tranquilities!

***

Photo of the Ocean off the coast of Fuerteventura near Ajuy, Spain taken by Simisa.

Photo of the Ocean off the coast of Fuerteventura near Ajuy, Spain taken by Simisa.

The sound, the odor of the foamy waters: he who has never experienced it, paid attention to it, or been enchanted by it does not understand the way things are. It is useless! He has not lived! It is something unique.

The colors, the varied hues, and afterwards, that white foam! It has its role in the beauty of the sea; could you imagine just how uninteresting the sea would be without that foam?

Music is an order of notes, and the Universe is a music of realities.

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St. Hyacintha Mariscotti

A religious of the Third Order of St. Francis and foundress of the Sacconi; born 1585 of a noble family at Vignanello, near Viterbo in Italy; died 30 January, 1640, at Viterbo; feast, 30 January; in Rome, 6 February (Diarium Romanum).

St. HyacinthaHer parents were Marc’ Antonio Mariscotti (Marius Scotus) and Ottavia Orsini. At Baptism she received the name Clarice and in early youth was remarkable for piety, but, as she grew older, she became frivolous, and showed a worldly disposition, which not even the almost miraculous…

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January 30 – St. Martina

January 29, 2015

St. Martina

Statue of St. Martina at the Basilica of St. Martina in Martina Franca, Italy.

Statue of St. Martina at the Basilica of St. Martina in Martina Franca, Italy.

Roman virgin, martyred in 226, according to some authorities, more probably in 228, under the pontificate of Pope Urban I, according to others. The daughter of an ex-consul and left an orphan at an early age, she so openly testified to her Christian faith that she could not escape the persecutions under Alexander Severus. Arrested and commanded to return to idolatry, she courageously refused, whereupon she was subjected to various tortures and was finally beheaded. The accounts of her martyrdom which we possess belong to a late period and as usual contain many amplifications which have not, as Baronius has already observed, any historical value. The relics of St. Martina were discovered on 25 Oct., 1634, in a crypt of an ancient church situated near Mamertine prison and dedicated to the saint. Urban VIII, who occupied the Holy See at that time, had the church repaired and, it would seem, composed the hymns which are sung at the office of the noble martyr, 30 January.

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Acta SS. Bolland. (1643), January, I, II; BARONIUS, Ann. (1589), 228, I; SURIUS, De vit. SS. (1618), I, 9-10; VINCENT OF BEAUVAIS, Spec. Hist. (1473), XII, 27-29; MOMBRITIUS, Sanctuarium (Milan, 1749), II, CXXV-XL; Ragguaglio della vita di S. Martina vergine e martire (Rome 1801).

LÉ CLUGNET (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Juliette ColbertJuliette Colbert, a native of Vendée, had married Marquis Tancredi Falletti of Barolo, and of her it could be said, even as we read of Tabitha in the Acts of the Apostles: “This woman had devoted herself to good works and acts of charity.”

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St. Marcella

Saint Marcella(325–410)  She was a Christian ascetic in ancient Rome. Growing up in Rome, she was influenced by her pious mother, Albina, an educated woman of wealth and benevolence. Childhood memories centered around piety, and one in particular related to Athanasius, who lodged in her home during one of his many exiles. He may have taken special interest in her…

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St. Henry Morse

Martyr; born in 1595 in Norfolk; died at Tyburn, 1 Feb., 1644.

St. Henry MorseHe was received into the church at Douai, 5 June, 1614, after various journeys was ordained at Rome, and left for the mission, 19 June, 1624.

He was admitted to the Society of Jesus at Heaton; there he was…

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Saint Brigid of Ireland

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stained_glass_window_(vi)_-_geograph.org.uk_-_905713.jpg

Stained glass window (vi) SS Patrick and Brigid, the two premier saints of Ireland, in St Joseph’s Church at Clifden. Photo by James Yardley.

Born in 451 or 452 of princely ancestors at Faughart, near Dundalk, County Louth; d. 1 February, 525, at Kildare. Refusing many good offers of marriage, she became a nun and received the veil from St. Macaille. With seven other virgins she settled for a time at the foot of Croghan Hill, but removed thence to Druin Criadh, in the plains of Magh Life, where under a large oak tree she erected her…

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St. Théophane Vénard

(JEAN-THÉOPHANE VÉNARD.)

Photo of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris by Vanka5.

Photo of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris by Vanka5.

French missionary, born at St-Loup, Diocese of Poitiers, 1829; martyred in Tonkin, 2 February, 1861. He studied at the College of Doue-la-Fontaine, Montmorillon, Poitiers, and at the Paris Seminary for Foreign Missions which he entered as a sub-deacon. Ordained priest 5 June, 1852, he departed for the Far East, 19 Sept. After fifteen months at Hong Kong he arrived at his mission in West Tonkin, where the Christians had recently been tried by a series of persecutions under Minh-Menh, a monster of cruelty. St. Theophane Venard Shortly after Father Vénard’s arrival a new royal edict was issued against Christians, and bishops and priests were obliged to seek refuge in caves, dense woods, and elsewhere. Father Vénard, whose constitution had always been delicate, suffered almost constantly, but continued to exercise his ministry at night, and, more boldly, in broad day. On 30 November, 1860, he was betrayed and captured. Tried before a mandarin, he refused to apostatize and was sentenced to be beheaded. He remained a captive until 2 February, and during this interval lived in a cage, from which he wrote to his family beautiful and consoling letters, joyful in anticipation of his crown. His bishop, Mgr Retord, wrote of him at this time: “Though in chains, he is as gay as a little bird”.

St. Theophane VenardOn the way to martyrdom Father Vénard chanted psalms and hymns. To his executioner, who coveted his clothing and asked what he would give to be killed promptly, he answered: “The longer it lasts the better it will be”. His head, after exposure at the top of a pole, was secured by the Christians and is now venerated in Tonkin. The body rests in the crypt at the Missions Etrangères, Paris. Other precious relics are in the hands of the martyr’s brother, Canon Eusebius Vénard, curé of Assais Deux Sèvres, France, who possesses, also, most of the martyr’s letters, including those written from the cage. In a letter addressed to his father, Théophane refers thus to his approaching sacrifice: “A slight sabre-cut will separate my head from my body, like the spring flower which the Master of the garden gathers for His pleasure. We are all flowers planted on this earth, which God plucks in His own good time: some a little sooner, some a little later . . . Father and son may we meet in Paradise. I, poor little moth, go first. Adieu”. The cause of his beatification was introduced at Rome in 1879, and he was declared Blessed, 2 May, 1909. The beatification ceremony brought a large delegation from France, including the Bishop of Poitiers and the martyr’s only surviving brother. Théophane Vénard was beatified in company with thirty-three other martyrs, most of whom were natives of Tonkin, Cochin-China, or China.

St. Theophane Venard

HERBERT, Théophane Vénard (London); WALSH, A Modern Martyr; Thoughts from Modern Martyrs; The Field Afar; Vie et Correspondence de J. Théophane Vénard (Poitiers, 1865); Le Bienheureux Théophane Vénard (Paris, 1911); Lettres Choisis du Bienheureux Théophane Vénard (Paris, 1909); CATTANEO, Un Martire Moderno (Milan, 1910).

JAMES ANTHONY WALSH (Catholic Encyclopedia)

[Note: He was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1988.]

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St. Lawrence

St. LawrenceSecond Archbishop of Canterbury, d. 2 Feb., 619. For the particulars of his life and pontificate we rely exclusively on details added by medieval writers being unsupported by historical evidence, though they may possibly embody ancient traditions. According to St. Bede, he was one of the original missionaries who left Rome with St. Augustine in 595 and finally landed in Thanet in 597. After St. Augustine had been consecrated he sent St. Lawrence back to Rome, to carry to the pope the news of the conversion of King Ethelbert and his people, to announce his consecration, and to ask for direction on certain questions. In this passage of the historian St. Lawrence is referred to as presbyter, in distinction to Peter who is called monachus. From this it has been conjectured that he was a secular priest and not a monk; but this conclusion has been questioned by Benedictine writers such as Elmham in the Middle Ages and Mabillon in later times. When St. Gregory had decided the questions asked, St. Lawrence returned to Britain bearing the replies, and he remained with St. Augustine sharing his work. That saint, shortly before his death which probably took place in 604, consecrated St. Lawrence as bishop, lest the infant Church should be left for a time without a pastor. Of the new archbishop’s episcopate Bede writes: “Lawrence, having attained the dignity of archbishop, strove most vigorously to add to the foundations of the Church which he had seen so nobly laid and to forward the work by frequent words of holy exhortation and by the constant example of his devoted labour.” St. Lawrence The only extant genuine document relating to him is the fragment preserved by Bede of the letter he addressed to the Celtic bishops exhorting them to peace and unity with Rome. The death of King Ethelbert, in 616 was followed by a heathen reaction under his son Eadbald, and under the sons of Sebert who became kings of the East Saxons. Saints Mellitus and Justus, bishops of the newly-founded Sees of London and Rochester, took refuge with St. Lawrence at Canterbury and urged him to fly to Gaul with them. They departed, and he, discouraged by the undoing of St. Augustine’s work, was preparing to follow them, when St. Peter appeared to him in a vision, blaming him for thinking of leaving his flock and inflicting stripes upon him. In the morning he hastened to the king, exhibiting his wounded body and relating his vision. This led to the conversion of the king, to the recall of Saints Mellitus and Justus, and to their perseverance in their work of evangelizing Kent and the neighbouring provinces. These events occurred about 617 or 618, and shortly afterwards St. Lawrence died and was buried near St. Augustine in the north porch of St. Peter’s Abbey church, afterwards known as St. Augustine’s. His festival is observed in England on 3 February.

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Bede, Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, I, xxvii; Ii, iv-vii; Elmham, Historia Monasterii S. Augustini in Rolls Series (London, 1858); Acta SS. Boland., February, I; Hardy, Descriptive Catalogue (London, 1862-71), giving a list of MS. lives; Haddan and Stubbs, Ecclesiastical Documents I (London, 1869), ii; Stubbs in Dict. Christ. Biog., s. v. Laurentius (25); Hunt in Dict. Nat. Biog., s. v. Lawrence.

EDWIN BURTON (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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According to USA Today:

The death of King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia on Thursday, at age 90, leaves British Queen Elizabeth II as the oldest living reigning monarch in the world.

The queen is 88, and will turn 89 on April 21, although her birthday is typically celebrated in June when the weather is better.

Meanwhile, she’s due to set other records this year: Next month marks her 63rd year on the throne, having acceded when her father, King George VI, died in February 1952.

And on Sept. 10, she pass her great-great grandmother, Queen Victoria, as the longest-reigning British monarch ever.

To read the entire article in USA Today, please click here.

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According to The Mirror:

The monarchy would be abolished and Queen Elizabeth II could be moved to a council house if the Green Party came to power, its leader Natalie Bennett said.

Under a Green government, the Royal Family would be booted out of Buckingham Palace and forced to pay a ‘wealth tax’ slapped on anyone worth more than £3million.

…this means the Government could potentially seize assets, Mrs Bennett defended the idea – and proposed a government that shifts the public’s general focus from money.

She added: “We have been driven by this neoliberal Thatcherite idea that what motivates people is money.”

To read the entire article in The Mirror, please click here.

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Faith Of The Vendéan

January 26, 2015

crossA Vendéan, named Repoche, who during the French Revolution served in the royal army, having been taken prisoner by the revolutionary party, was conducted by them to a place where a cross had been erected, and there he was thus accosted: “You have been taken with arms in your hands, and so your life is forfeited. There yonder is the cottage in which you were born; your father is still living there; now your life will be spared to you if you will do one thing. Take up that axe and at once cut down that cross.” Repoche took up the axe; his fellow prisoners turned aside their heads and trembled, for they thought that Repoche was about abjuring his God.

axeRepoche, brandishing the axe over his head, sprung upon the pedestal of the cross, and uplifting his arm, cried out in tones loud enough to be heard by even those who were at a distance: “Death to him who shall insult the cross of Jesus Christ! I shall defend it from ignominy to my last breath!” With his back to the sacred wood, he swung the axe round his head, his eyes brilliant with a Divine fire, and his frame endued with supernatural strength. For some minutes he succeeded in warding off the sacrilegious soldiers, but soon he was overwhelmed by numbers, and though transfixed in every part of his body, he still clung fast to the cross, and in this position was put to death.

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Stories from The Catechist by Very Rev. Canon G. E. Howe, Pg. 354, #827

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 458

 

 

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By Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

 

Dr. Plinio

Is it a sin to hate? Why or why not? A survey of Catholics on this question would draw curious answers revealing a terrible confusion of ideas and a fundamental lack of logic.

The many people still intoxicated with remnants of romanticism inherited from the nineteenth century consider hate not only a sin, but the sin par excellence. The romantic defines an evil man as one who harbors hate in his heart. On the contrary, the virtue par excellence is goodness, and every sin is attenuated if committed by a “good-hearted” person. How often we hear such remarks as: “Poor fellow, in his ‘weakness’ he committed such-and such iniquity, but deep down he’s really a good person, with a beautiful heart;” or: “Poor fellow, he let the theft take place in his department, but it was only out of an excess of goodness. He just can’t refuse anything to anyone.”

Photo of Kim Jong-Un by petersnoopy. In an interview, Dennis Rodman, who spent time on the private island of Kim Jong-Un, said that the Communist North Korean leader was a "good guy", a "good-hearted kid." "I don't care what he does over there – between me and him we're friends. I don't care," the former American basketball player said.

Photo of Kim Jong-Un by petersnoopy. In an interview, Dennis Rodman, who spent time on the private island of Kim Jong-Un, said that the Communist North Korean leader was a “good guy”, a “good-hearted kid.” “I don’t care what he does over there – between me and him we’re friends. I don’t care,” the former American basketball player said.

What has “good-hearted” come to mean? Evidently, it does not refer to the heart per se, but to a state of spirit. A “good-hearted” person is one who acutely feels the sufferings of others, and who, for the same reason, never causes another to suffer.
A person with a good heart will also consistently forgo punishing his children for their misbehavior, or will allow anarchy to invade the classroom in which he teaches or the workplace he superintends. A reprimand would cause suffering, which the good-hearted one cannot bear; he suffers too much in causing others to suffer. The good-hearted sacrifices everything to this primary objective of sparing others any suffering. If he hears anyone complaining about the rigor of the Ten Commandments, he immediately thinks of reforms, mitigations, or accommodating interpretations. Seeing anyone suffering from envy for not being a noble or a millionaire, he immediately thinks of democratization.

If he is a judge, his goodness will lead him to rationalize the law rather than punish certain crimes. If a police officer, he will close his eyes to deeds that he is duty-bound to prohibit. A prison warden, he will treat the inmates as innocent victims of their times and environment. Accordingly, he will end up establishing a penal system that will make the prison a meeting place of all vices in which free communication among prisoners leads them to vices they originally lacked. If he is a teacher, he will indolently and good-naturedly pass students who fail their tests. A legislator, he will systematically favor all kinds of measures to reduce hours and raise salaries. If involved in international politics, he will favor compromises and hasty capitulations, so long as a few more days of peace can be gained without wasting much effort.

Book image of "Rejecting The Da Vinci Code" How a Blasphemous Novel Brutally Attacks Our Lord and the Catholic Church, published by the American TFP.

Book image of “Rejecting The Da Vinci Code” How a Blasphemous Novel Brutally Attacks Our Lord and the Catholic Church, published by the American TFP.

Behind all these approaches is the notion that physical or moral suffering is the only evil in this world. In this view, good is anything that tends to prevent or suppress suffering, and evil is anything that tends to cause or increase it. The good-hearted has a special sensitivity whereby he is easily moved at the sight of any suffering, and defends any and every person who suffers as if he were the victim of an unjust aggression. From this perspective, to love one’s neighbor is to desire that he not suffer; to cause him suffering is always and necessarily the same as to hate him.

Hence, a special psychology is contrived for the benefit of the good-hearted man. All those who show zeal for order, for hierarchy, for the integrity of principles, for the defense of good against the attacks of evil, are heartless people because, in their vigor, they cause suffering to those “poor fellows” who, “in weakness,” slipped and fell.
And if the good-hearted man tolerates all the world’s sinners, it is quite understandable that he will likewise hate the “bad-hearted” man who “makes others suffer.”

Theresa "Terri" Schiavo, starved slowly to death in the name of "goodness."

Theresa “Terri” Schiavo, starved slowly to death in the name of “goodness.”

These are the general lines upon which we can construct a common state of spirit which up to now we have discussed theoretically. Thanks be to God, only a relatively small number of people actually reach these extremes, but we frequently find people who act entirely like this in diverse places, and there are many people in whom some aspects of this spirit may be found.

Even here, some examples are illuminating. To show how people are deeply imbued with this problem, we chose these examples from ways of speaking and feeling common among Catholics.

A sentiment shared by many Catholics  across the country.

A sentiment shared by many Catholics across the country.

Let us begin by briefly recalling Catholic teaching in this matter so that we may understand the errors in the examples that will follow.

For the Church, the greatest evil in this world is not suffering, but sin. The greatest good does not consist in having good health, a bountiful table, tranquil sleep, enjoyment of honors, or little need of work, but in doing God’s will. While suffering is certainly an evil, it is an evil that may often be transformed into a good for one’s formation, as a means of expiation or spiritual progress. The Church is our Mother, the most tender, the most solicitous of mothers. Of Her it can be said, as is said of Our Lady, that She is Mater Admirabilis, Mater Misericordiae – Mother Most Admirable, Mother of Mercy.
She has always striven, and will strive until the end of time, to remove any useless pain from mankind. But, She will never cease to impose pain to the extent that the glory of God and the salvation of souls requires it. She demanded that the martyrs in all ages endure atrocious torments; She asked the crusaders to sacrifice the comforts of their homes for endless fatigue, endless combats, even their deaths, in foreign lands. Still today, She requires missionaries to expose themselves to multiple risks and to weariness, and these in the most inhospitable and remote corners of the earth. Of all the faithful She asks incessant struggle against their passions and continual interior efforts to resist all that is evil.

Thousands March to Save Marriage in New York City. The march was organized by State Senator Ruben Diaz.

Thousands March to Save Marriage in New York City. The march was organized by State Senator Ruben Diaz.

All this causes such intense and unbearable suffering for our human weakness that the Church teaches that no one can practice the Commandments continually and in their totality without God’s grace..

The Church imposes all these sufferings with prudence and goodness, true, but without vacillation, remorse, or weakness. This is not in spite of the Her being a good mother, but because She is a good mother. A mother who hesitates, shies away, or feels remorse when obliging her son to study or to undergo a painful but necessary medical treatment or a deserved punishment, would not be a good mother.

The Church also expects this behavior from Her children not only in what pertains to themselves but also in relation to their neighbors. We must not just seek to avoid useless and avoidable sufferings. We must have merciful hearts toward our neighbors, pitying them in their sufferings and sparing ourselves little in alleviating them. All the while, we must love mortification, courageously discipline our bodies and, especially, fight the defects of our souls persistently, clearsightedly, and precisely. And, as the love for our neighbors leads us to desire for them what we should desire for ourselves, we must not hesitate to see them suffer when their sanctification demands it.
Applying these principles, it is easy to point out many deviations that are born from the romantic conception of the good-hearted.

The people carried signs against Planned Parenthood in front of their offices on 7th Ave., New York City.

The people carried signs against Planned Parenthood in front of their offices on 7th Ave in New York City.

It is typical of the good-hearted to condone veiled forms of divorce and pity the couple, to favor the abolition of religious and priestly celibacy, to pity those consecrated to God, and to regard the various forms of birth control and abortion with leniency and pity for the mother. In other fields, being good-hearted consists in opposing any favorable opinions, even though they be just and temperate, concerning the Index, the Holy Office, the Inquisition, (aside from the abuses that occurred in some places), or the Crusades, because all these caused suffering. In yet other fields, the good-hearted will avoid speaking of demons, of hell, of purgatory. He will not warn the sick that death is near, nor inform the sinner of the gravity of his moral state, talking to them about neither mortification, nor penitence, nor amendment of life, because all these would cause suffering. He will not speak against immoral fashions and dances nor vigorously censure movies, because doing so would appear uncharitable for the suffering that it would cause.

We have seen Catholic educators oppose scholastic awards because they impose suffering on the underachievers! Similarly, we have seen religious institutions tolerate elements in their communities inimical to their own members and demoralizing to the public because expelling the transgressors would make them suffer. We knew of someone who opposed a campaign against immoral newspapers because this would have upset the editors, whose souls we should save!

"...being good-hearted consists in opposing any favorable opinions." A local entrepreneur attacking  and tearing to shreds a traditional marriage banner.

“…being good-hearted consists in opposing any favorable opinions.” A local entrepreneur attacking and tearing to shreds a traditional marriage banner.

We made this long digression to bring into clearer focus the problem formulated at the outset. To the good-hearted, all hatred is necessarily sinful. Will they say the same in light of Catholic doctrine?

We scarcely dare utter that question, fearing the perilous avalanche of fury from the “good-hearted,” who are so plentiful. And we shall certainly not answer in our own words. Rather, we will speak, in our next article, through the great and authoritative voice of Saint Thomas.

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St. Angela Merici

St. Angela Merici

Foundress of the Ursulines, born 21 March, 1474, at Desenzano, a small town on the southwestern shore of Lake Garda in Lombardy; died 27 January, 1540, at Brescia.

She was left an orphan…

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Charlemagne

(French for Charles the Great, Carolus Magnus, or Carlus Magnus; German Karl der Grosse).

Charlemagne, painted by Albrecht Dürer

The name given by later generations to Charles, King of the Franks, first sovereign of the Christian Empire of the West; born 2 April, 742; died at Aachen, 28 January, 814.

At the time of Charles’ birth, his father, Pepin the Short, Mayor of the Palace, of the line of Arnulf, was…

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Landulph, his father, was Count of Aquino; Theodora, his mother, Countess of Teano. His family was related to the Emperors Henry VI and Frederick II, and to the Kings of Aragon, Castile, and France. Calo relates that a holy hermit foretold his career, saying to Theodora before his birth: “He will enter the Order of Friars Preachers, and so great will be his learning and sanctity that in his day no one will be found to equal him”…

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St. Paulinus II, Patriarch of Aquileia

St. Paulinus IIBorn at Premariacco, near Cividale, Italy, about 730-40; died 802. Born probably of a Roman family during Longobardic rule in Italy, he was brought up in the patriarchal schools at Cividale. After ordination he became master of the school. He acquired a thorough Latin culture, pagan and Christian. He had also a deep knowledge of jurisprudence, and…

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General Henri de La RochejaqueleinWhile Turreau was thus devastating La Vendée, where were Larochejacquelein, Stofflet, and Charette? Had they forgotten their country and its cause—were they deaf to her cries of distress? Charette still fought in the depths of the Marais; Stofflet in the recesses of the Bocage…

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St. Gildas

Surnamed the Wise; born about 516; died at Houat, Brittany, 570. Sometimes he is called “Badonicus” because, as he tells us, his birth took place the year the Britons gained a famous victory over the Saxons at Mount Badon, near Bath, Somersetshire (493 or 516). The biographies of Gildas exist — one written by an unknown Breton monk of the Abbey of Rhuys in the…

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The Noble Religious Brother

January 22, 2015

During the terrible Commune at Paris in the year 1871 a company of armed Communists entered a house of a community of religious Brothers at Picpus, near that city. As soon as they entered the house the first person they met was Brother Stanislaus, who was only twenty-six years old, whom they at once seized […]

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Luther Thought He Was Divine!

January 22, 2015

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira I do not understand how men of the Church today, including some of the most cultured, learned, and illustrious, mythicize the figure of Luther, the heresiarch, in their zeal to favor an ecumenical rapprochement directly with Protestantism and indirectly with all the religions, schools of philosophy, and so forth. Do […]

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January 23 – Defended by a raven

January 22, 2015

St. Vincent of Saragossa Deacon of Saragossa, and martyr under Diocletian, 304; mentioned in the Roman Martyrology, 22 Jan., with St. Anastasius the Persian, honoured by the Greeks, 11 Nov. This most renowned martyr of Spain is represented in the dalmatic of a deacon, and has as emblems a cross, a raven, a grate, or […]

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January 24 – They called him “Ironmonger”

January 22, 2015

Blessed William Ireland (Alias Ironmonger.) Jesuit martyr, born in Lincolnshire, 1636; executed at Tyburn, 24 Jan. (not 3 Feb.), 1679; eldest son of William Ireland of Crofton Hall, Yorkshire, by Barbara, a daughter of Ralph Eure, of Washingborough, Lincolnshire (who is to be distinguished from the last Lord Eure) by his first wife. He was […]

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January 24 – Saintly and Aristocrat

January 22, 2015

St. Francis de Sales Bishop of Geneva, Doctor of the Universal Church; born at Thorens, in the Duchy of Savoy, 21 August, 1567; died at Lyons, 28 December, 1622. His father, François de Sales de Boisy, and his mother, Françoise de Sionnaz, belonged to old Savoyard aristocratic families. The future saint was the eldest of […]

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January 25 – St. Poppo

January 22, 2015

St. Poppo Abbot, born 977; died at Marchiennes, 25 January, 1048. He belonged to a noble family of Flanders; his parents were Tizekinus and Adalwif. About the year 1000 he made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land with two others of his countrymen. Soon after this he also went on a pilgrimage to Rome. He […]

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January 25 – Blessed Teresa Grillo Michel

January 22, 2015

BL. TERESA GRILLO MICHEL was born in Spinetta Marengo (Alessandria), Italy, on 25 September 1855. She was the fifth and last child of Giuseppe, the head physician at the Civil Hospital of Alessandria, and of Maria Antonietta Parvopassau, a descendent of an illustrious family of Alessandria. At Baptism she was given the name of Maddalena. […]

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January 25 – St. Ildephonsus

January 22, 2015

St. Ildephonsus Archbishop of Toledo; died 23 January, 667. He was born of a distinguished family and was a nephew of St. Eugenius, his predecessor in the See of Toledo. At an early age, despite the determined opposition of his father, he embraced the monastic life in the monastery of Agli, near Toledo. While he […]

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January 26 – She was from one of the first families of Rome

January 22, 2015

St. Paula Born in Rome, 347; died at Bethlehem, 404. She belonged to one of the first families of Rome. Left a widow in 379 at the age of 32 she became, through the influence of St. Marcella and her group, the model of Christian widows. In 382 took place her decisive meeting with St. […]

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Luxembourg Grand Ducal family will visit Auschwitz-Birkenau and Slonsk

January 19, 2015

According to the Luxemburger Wort: Luxembourg’s Grand Ducal couple, as well as Prince Guillaume and Princess Stéphanie, are set to travel to Poland later this month to mark the 70th anniversaries of the liberation of Auschwitz and a prison massacre in Slonsk. Guillaume and Stéphanie will attend a ceremony on January 27 to remember the […]

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French prince: “I am not Charlie”

January 19, 2015

According to Free Republic: Prince Charles-Philippe d’Orléans…is not a part of this vast movement “I’m Charlie” although obviously he condemns these acts that have so shaken France and worldwide. Here is his statement: “Charlie Hebdo is a vulgar paper, despising all opinions except its own, which, under the guise of freedom of expression, will allow […]

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A king shows repentance

January 19, 2015

In 1699, the famous sacred orator Father Jean Baptiste Massillon was made Court preacher at Versailles. After one of his sermons, Louis XIV thanked him saying: “Father, I have heard many preachers who leave me feeling happy with myself. But when I hear your sermons I always feel very dissatisfied.” Edmond Guérard, Dictionnaire encyclopédique d’anécdotes […]

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Pagan Manliness and False Christian Patience

January 19, 2015

If we compare the features of this third-century Roman, represented in a splendid sculpture from the Capitoline Palace, with those of the famous Apollo Belvedere, its irregularities become evident. In this sense, we could not exactly call this man handsome. Nonetheless, no one can deny that his countenance possesses a certain element of beauty, mainly […]

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January 20 – A dove landed on his head, and you would not believe what happened next!

January 19, 2015

Pope St. Fabian (FABIANUS) Pope (236-250), the extraordinary circumstances of whose election is related by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., VI, 29). After the death of Anterus he had come to Rome, with some others, from his farm and was in the city when the new election began. While the names of several illustrious and noble persons […]

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January 20 – St. Sebastian

January 19, 2015

A.D. 288. St. Sebastian was born at Narbonne, in Gaul, but his parents were of Milan, in Italy, and he was brought up in that city. He was a fervent servant of Christ, and though his natural inclinations gave him an aversion to a military life, yet, to be better able, without suspicion, to assist […]

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January 21 – None was held in such high honor

January 19, 2015

St. Agnes of Rome Of all the virgin martyrs of Rome none was held in such high honour by the primitive church, since the fourth century, as St. Agnes. St. Ambrose gives her age as twelve (De Virginibus, I, 2; P.L., XVI, 200-202: Haec duodecim annorum martyrium fecisse traditur), St. Augustine as thirteen (Agnes puella […]

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January 21 – He was put to death, just for being a king

January 19, 2015

His Last Will and Testament The last Will and Testament of Louis XVI, King of France and Navarre, given on Christmas day, 1792. In the name of the Very holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Ghost. To-day, the 25th day of December, 1792, I, Louis XVI King of France, being for more than four months […]

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January 22 – Patroness of abuse victims

January 19, 2015

Blessed Laura Vicuña Laura del Carmen Vicuña was born on April 5, 1891 in Santiago, Chile. She was the first daughter of the Vicuña Pino family. Her parents were José Domingo Vicuña, a soldier with aristocratic roots, and Mercedes Pino. Her father was in military service and her mother worked at home. At the very […]

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January 22 – The noble who often gave away even his shoes

January 19, 2015

St. Vincent Mary Pallotti The founder of the Pious Society of Missions, born at Rome, 21 April, 1798; died there, 22 Jan., 1850. He lies buried in the church of San Salvatore in Onda. He was descended from the noble families of the Pallotti of Norcia and the De Rossi of Rome. His early studies […]

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January 22 – Blessed Prince

January 19, 2015

Blessed Prince László Batthyány-Strattmann Ladislaus Batthyány-Strattmann (1870-1931), a layman, doctor and father of a family. He was born on 28 October 1870 in Dunakiliti, Hungary, into an ancient noble family. He was the sixth of 10 brothers. In 1876 the family moved to Austria. When Ladislaus was 12 years old his mother died. He was […]

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St. Elizabeth of Portugal

January 15, 2015

St. Elizabeth, Queen of Portugal, had nothing so much at heart as the promotion of those outward signs and ceremonies which are the ornaments of God’s worship. “To enable men to whom God has given a body as well as a soul to fix their minds on heavenly things,” she used to say,” it is […]

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Divorce and Romanticism

January 15, 2015

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Saint Angela Merici wisely observed, “disorder in the world is the result of disorder in the family.” Over the last generation, the disorder in American family life has grown exponentially. In 1940, there was one divorce for every six marriages; by 1975, the U.S. divorce rate had climbed to one […]

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January 16 – St. Euphrosyne

January 15, 2015

Saint Euphrosyne Died about 470. Her story belongs to that group of legends which relate how Christian virgins, in order the more successfully to lead the life of celibacy and asceticism to which they had dedicated themselves, put on male attire and passed for men. According to the narrative of her life in the “Vitae […]

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January 16 – When the Emporor insisted that the lapsed be readmitted to communion without penance, one man stood in his way. This is his story.

January 15, 2015

Pope St. Marcellus I His date of birth unknown; elected pope in May or June, 308; died in 309. For some time after the death of Marcellinus in 304 the Diocletian persecution continued with unabated severity. After the abdication of Diocletian in 305, and the accession in Rome of Maxentius to the throne of the […]

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January 16 – The true disciple of St. Francis who sent the Moorish king into a fit of rage

January 15, 2015

St. Berard of Carbio (Or BERALDUS). Friar Minor and martyr; d. 16 January, 1220. Of the noble family of Leopardi, and a native of Carbio in Umbria, Berard was received into the Franciscan Order by the Seraphic Patriarch himself, in 1213. He was well versed in Arabic, an eloquent preacher, and was chosen by St. […]

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January 16 – Irish Prince and Saint

January 15, 2015

St. Fursey An Abbot of Lagny, near Paris, died 16 Jan., about 650. He was the son of Fintan, son of Finloga, prince of South Muster, and Gelgesia, daughter of Aedhfinn, prince of Hy-Briuin in Connaught. He was born probably amongst the Hy-Bruin, and was baptized by St. Brendan the Traveller, his father’s uncle, who […]

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January 17 – Sister of the Grand Master of Malta

January 15, 2015

St. Roseline of Villeneuve (or Rossolina.) Having overcome her father’s opposition Roseline became a Carthusian nun at Bertaud in the Alps of Dauphiné. Her “consecration” took place in 1288, and about 1330 she succeeded her aunt, Blessed Jeanne or Diane de Villeneuve, as Prioress of Celle-Robaud in the Diocese of Fréjus near her home. In […]

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January 17 – Scanderbeg: the hero of Christendom

January 15, 2015

In a history, where so much is spoken of the regions, from whence the miraculous Image of Our Lady of Good Counsel came, it will be of great use to take a brief glance at the once entirely Catholic nation in which it so long remained, and at the great client of its Sanctuary in […]

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January 18 – St. Margaret of Hungary

January 15, 2015

St. Margaret of Hungary Daughter of King Bela I of Hungary and his wife Marie Laskaris, born 1242; died 18 Jan., 1271. According to a vow which her parents made when Hungary was liberated from the Tatars that their next child should be dedicated to religion, Margaret, in 1245 entered the Dominican Convent of Veszprem. […]

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January 19 – Archbishop Senator of the Spanish Kingdom

January 15, 2015

Blessed Marcelo Rafael José María de los Dolores Hilario Spinola y Maestre, Archbishop of Seville born: 14 January 1835. died 20 January 1906 Marcelo Spínola was born on the island of San Fernando, Cádiz Province. His parents were Juan Spínola y Osorno, Marquis of Spínola and Antonia Maestre y Osorno; they had eight children, of […]

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January 19 – Noble martyrs of Persia

January 15, 2015

Sts. Maris, Martha, Audifax, and Abachum All martyred at Rome in 270. Maris and his wife Martha, who belonged to the Persian nobility, came to Rome with their children in the reign of Emperor Claudius II. As zealous Christians, they sympathized with and succoured the persecuted faithful, and buried the bodies of the slain. This […]

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January 19 – Saintly King

January 15, 2015

St. Canute IV Elected king on the death of his brother Harold about 1080, he waged war on his barbarous enemies and brought Courland and Livonia to the faith. Having married Eltha, daughter of Robert, Count of Flanders, he had a son Charles, surnamed the good. He was a strong ruler, as is proved by […]

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Prince Harry signs book of condolence (Video)

January 12, 2015

According to The Royal Correspondent: On Friday, January 9, 2015, His Royal Highness Prince Harry of Wales arrived at the French Embassy in London to sign the book of condolence… Source.

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Queen Elizabeth II sends message to the people of France

January 12, 2015

According to the official website of the British monarchy: Prince Philip and I send our sincere condolences to the families of those who have been killed and to those who have been injured in the attack in Paris this morning. We send our thoughts and prayers to all those who have been affected, Elizabeth R. […]

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A Polish princess gives alms to the poor

January 12, 2015

While passing through Metz in 1725 on her way to become Queen of France, Maria Leszczynska received from the Jews of the city a rich gift of gold and silver vases. After admiring them for some moments, the Polish princess ordered them to be delivered to the city’s bishop, then sold, so that the proceeds […]

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If someone were to suffer a sudden disturbance of his eyes…

January 12, 2015

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira The famous painting by Velasquez, “The Little Girls”, is taken, and rightly so, as one of the great works of pictorial art. The childish and candid grace of “La Infanta”, the most dignified and respectful kindness of the young noble women who serve her, the proud and noble bearing of […]

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January 13 – The bold strategic vision of Cluny

January 12, 2015

Saint Berno of Cluny (c. 850 – 13 January 927) was first abbot of Cluny from its foundation in 910 until he resigned in 925. He was subject only to the pope and began the tradition of the Cluniac reforms which his successors brought to fruition across Europe. Berno was first a monk at St. […]

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January 13 – This Saint Opposed Bishop Lucifer

January 12, 2015

St. Hilary of Poitiers Bishop, born in that city at the beginning of the fourth century; died there 1 November, according to the most accredited opinion, or according to the Roman Breviary, on 13 January, 368. Belonging to a noble and very probably pagan family, he was instructed in all the branches of profane learning, […]

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January 13 – The Count Who Converted the King

January 12, 2015

St. Remigius of Rheims Apostle of the Franks, Archbishop of Rheims, b. at Cerny or Laon, 437; d. at Rheims, 13 January 533. His father was Emile, Count of Laon. He studied literature at Rheims and soon became so noted for learning and sanctity that he was elected Archbishop of Rheims in his twenty-second year. […]

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January 14 – Blessed Devasahayam Pillai

January 12, 2015

Blessed Devasahayam Pillai Devasahayam Pillai (named Neelakanda Pillai at birth) was born into an affluent Nair-caste family at Nattalam in the present-day Kanyakumari District, on 23 April 1712. Devasahayam’s family had much influence in the royal palace of Maharaja Marthanda Varma, king of Travancore, and Devasahayam went into the service of the royal palace as […]

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