New Guinea, October 1942. Pictured, left to right: Australian Colonel Charles Spry points out locations of heavy fighting between Allied ground forces and the Japanese to Lieutenant General Edmund Herring, General Douglas MacArthur, and Major General Arthur Samuel Allen.

New Guinea, October 1942. Pictured, left to right: Australian Colonel Charles Spry points out locations of heavy fighting between Allied ground forces and the Japanese to Lieutenant General Edmund Herring, General Douglas MacArthur, and Major General Arthur Samuel Allen.

In this closing chapter, I wish to reveal the secret source of General MacArthur’s power, his genius and his statesmanship and the very essence of his wonderful qualities of leadership….

[W]hen MacArthur miraculously escaped from Corregidor and finally reached Australia, the General found the people there in a state of despair. The morale of the troops of Australia and New Zealand was at a dangerous, desperate low ebb and, seeing this demoralizing condition of the country and the troops MacArthur decided that he must at once bolster the spirits of the Allied armies and the people. He sent a message to his friend Howard Chandler Christy in New York asking him to please, as soon as possible, paint a series of pictures that could be used to help bolster and inspire the spirits of the Allied troops and the peoples of Australia and New Zealand.

Howard Chandler Christy in his Studio.

Howard Chandler Christy in his Studio.

When Christy received that message from MacArthur, he at once sent a reply back to General MacArthur asking him to put into words the thoughts and sentiments that he had in mind that he might wish to have reflected in the paintings. MacArthur then dispatched to Christy the following:

Our Lord

 

“September 24, 1942

Howard Chandler Christy

Layman’s National Committee

New York, New York

 

Two thousand years ago a man dared stand for truth, for freedom of the human spirit, was crucified and died, yet this death was not the end, but only the beginning, to be followed by the resurrection and the life. For twenty centuries the story of the man of Galilee has served for all Christians as lesson and symbol so that today when we stress the spiritual significance of our united efforts to reestablish the supremacy of our Christian principles we can humbly and without presumption declare our faith and confidence in God’s help in our final victory.

MacArthur”

 

Joseph Choate, Douglas MacArthur As I Knew Him: A Narrative Eulogy of the Magnificent Statesmanship of General Douglas MacArthur (Privately printed, 1986), 93-4.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 530

 

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Robert, Duke of Normandy

Question: This provides the substance of the crusading spirit, which passes first by this compassion for Our Lord, isn’t it?

Yes, but keep well in mind what this compassion is. It is a compassion that, facing the uselessness of everything, asks that order be reestablished through punishment and reparation; and which avidly unsheathes the sword because sweetness has been defeated! And it is indignant, because sweetness was unable to win, as if saying, “He Who was super, hyper well deserving, He Who was Sweetness itself, has been unable to win. You bandits, I’ll show you!”

knight in battle

From here comes something that exists in the Crusade, in the first moment of the Crusade before the “Deus vult!” It is a kind of flash, the flash of this situation in which, under attack, brutal, consolidated and irremediable sin replies, “I will not bow.”  The end result is indignation and furor: “Miserable, so now I’ll show you!”  …

Knights of Various Military Orders

Starting from an act of contrition, an act of love by a soul that has allowed itself to be thus touched, a Crusader who has allowed himself to be touched, he understood all this, and he loved it with a profound and almost lyrical love – if this can be said of man’s love for God. This is the sweetness of our retribution which, seeing that others do not reciprocate, but go so far as they can [in the opposite direction], unleashes this idea in the Crusader: “If the sword alone will work, well then so be it! God wills it!”

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(Extract from an MNF, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

 

 

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St. John the Baptist

Statue of St. John the Baptist

Statue of St. John the Baptist

The principal sources of information concerning the life and ministry of St. John the Baptist are the canonical Gospels. Of these St. Luke is the most complete, giving as he does the wonderful circumstances accompanying the birth of the Precursor and items on his ministry and death. St. Matthew’s Gospel stands in close relation with that of St. Luke, as far as John’s public ministry is concerned, but contains nothing in reference to his early life. From St. Mark, whose account of the Precursor’s life is very meagre, no new detail can be gathered. Finally, the fourth Gospel has this special feature, that it gives the testimony of St. John after the Saviour’s baptism. Besides the indications supplied by these writings, passing allusions occur in such passages as Acts, xiii, 24; xix, 1-6; but these are few and bear on the subject only indirectly. To the above should be added that Josephus relates in his Jewish Antiquities (XVIII, v, 2), but it should be remembered that he is woefully erratic in his dates, mistaken in proper names…

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Simon de Montfort

An Earl of Leicester, date of birth unknown, died at Toulouse, 25 June, 1218. Simon (IV) de Montfort was descended from the lords of Montfort l’Amaury in Normandy, being the second son of Simon (III), and Amicia, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, third Earl of Leicester. Having succeeded his father as Baron de Montfort in 1181, in 1190 he married Alice de Montmorency, the daughter of Bouchard (III) de Montmorency. In 1199 while taking part in a tournament at Ecry-sur-Aisne in the province of Champagne he heard Fulk de Neuilly preaching the crusade, and in company with Count Thibaud de Champagne and many other nobles and knights he took the cross. Unfortunately, the crusade got out of control, and the French knights, instead of co-operating with the pope, decided on a campaign in Egypt, and on their arrival at Venice entered on a contract for transport across the Mediterranean. Being unable to fulfill the terms of the contract, they compounded by assisting the Venetians to capture Zara in Dalmatia. In vain the pope urged them to set out for the Holy Land. They preferred to march on Constantinople, though Simon de Montfort offered energetic opposition to this proposal. Notwithstanding his efforts, the expedition was undertaken…

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Or WILLIAM OF MONTE VERGINE.)

Saint William of Vercelli's statue at St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican. 1878

The founder of the Hermits of Monte Vergine, or Williamites, born 1085; died 25 June, 1142. He was the son of noble parents, both of whom died when he was still a child, and his education was entrusted to one of his kinsmen. At the age of fifteen he made up his mind to renounce the world and lead a life of penance. With this end in view, he went on a pilgrimage to St. James of Compostella, and, not content with the ordinary hardships of such a pilgrimage, he encircled his body with iron bands to increase his suffering. After this journey he started on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, but it was revealed to him that he would…

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St. Anthelm of Belley

St Anthelm of Belley

(1107 – 1178) Prior of the Carthusian Grand Chartreuse and bishop of Belley.

He was born near Chambéry in 1107. He would later receive an ecclesiastical benefice in the area of Belley. When he was thirty years old, he resigned from this position to become a Carthusian monk at Portes. Only two years after joining the order, he was made the prior of the Grande Chartreuse, the motherhouse of his order, which had recently incurred substantial damage…

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St. Ladislaus

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

Photo of the Reliquary of King Saint Ladislaus I of Hungary by Asybaris01 and located in the Cathedral of Győr.

King of Hungary, born 1040; died at Neutra, 29 July, 1095; one of Hungary’s national Christian heroes. He was the son of Béla I; the nobles, after the death of Geisa I, passed over Solomon, son of Andrew I, and chose Ladislaus to be their king in 1077. It is true that he made peace with Solomon, when the latter gave up all claims to the throne of Hungary; however, later on he rebelled against Ladislaus, who took him prisoner and held in the fortress of Visegrád. On the occasion of the canonization of Stephen I, Ladislaus gave Solomon his freedom, but in 1086 Solomon, with the aid of the heathen Cumans, revolted against Ladislaus a second time; the latter, however, vanquished them…

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St. Cyril of Alexandria

Doctor of the Church. St. Cyril has his feast in the Western Church on the 28th of January; in the Greek Menaea it is found on the 9th of June, and (together with St. Athanasius) on the 18th of January.

St. Cyril of AlexandriaHe seems to have been of an Alexandrian family and was the son of the brother of Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria; if he is the Cyril addressed by Isidore of Pelusium in Ep. xxv of Bk. I, he was for a time a monk. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople when that bishop held the “Synod of the Oak” in 402 and deposed St. John Chrysostom. Theophilus died 15 Oct., 412, and on the 18th Cyril was consecrated his uncle’s successor…

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From the 1942 Christmas message of Pius XII:

The Quail Shoot by Francisco de Goya Y Lucientes

If the life of society involves inner unity, it does not, however, preclude differences which are upheld by reality and nature. Yet when one looks to God, the supreme regulator of all that concerns man, then men’s similarities as well as differences find their proper place in the absolute order of being, of values and therefore also of morality. If, on the other hand, this foundation is shaken, then a dangerous breach is opened between the various areas of culture, and an uncertainty and instability of boundaries, limits, and values appears.

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Discorsi e radiomessagi di Sua Santità Pio XII (Tipografia Poliglotta Vaticana), Vol. 4, p. 331 in Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents V, p. 485.

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According to Us Weekly:

During the Trooping the Colour ceremony on Saturday, June 11, Queen Elizabeth quickly reminded her grandson Prince William who runs the show.

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St. Aloysius Gonzaga

When we see a young prince, the darling of his family and country, sacrifice nobility, sovereignty, riches, and pleasures, the more easily to secure the treasure of divine love, and of eternal happiness, how ought we to condemn our own sloth, who live as if heaven were to cost us nothing!

When we see a young prince, the darling of his family and country, sacrifice nobility, sovereignty, riches, and pleasures, the more easily to secure the treasure of divine love, and of eternal happiness, how ought we to condemn our own sloth, who live as if heaven were to cost us nothing!

Aloysius Gonzaga was son of Ferdinand Gonzaga, prince of the holy empire, and marquis of Castiglione, removed in the third degree of kindred from the duke of Mantua. His mother was Martha Tana Santena, daughter of Tanus Santena, lord of Cherry, in Piedmont. She was lady of honor to Isabel, the wife of Philip II of Spain, in whose court the marquis Gonzaga also lived in great favor. When she understood this nobleman had asked her in marriage both of the king and queen, and of her friends in Italy, being a lady of remarkable piety, she spent her time in fasting and prayer in order to learn the will of heaven, and to draw…

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St. John Fisher

St. John Fisher

Cardinal, Bishop of Rochester, and martyr; born at Beverley, Yorkshire, England, 1459 (?1469); died 22 June, 1535. John was the eldest son of Robert Fisher, merchant of Beverley, and Agnes his wife. His early education was probably received in the school attached to the collegiate church in his native town, whence in 1484 he removed to Michaelhouse, Cambridge. He took the degree of B.A. in 1487, proceeded M.A. in 1491, in which year he was elected a fellow of his college, and was made Vicar of Northallerton, Yorkshire. In 1494 he resigned his benefice to become proctor of his university, and three years later was…

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St. Thomas More

Saint, knight, Lord Chancellor of England, author and martyr, born in London, 7 February, 1477-78; executed at Tower Hill, 6 July, 1535.

Judge More - Sir Thomas More's father

Judge More – Sir Thomas More’s father

He was the sole surviving son of Sir John More, barrister and later judge, by his first wife Agnes, daughter of Thomas Graunger. While still a child Thomas was sent to St. Anthony’s School in Threadneedle Street, kept by Nicholas Holt, and when thirteen years old was placed in the household of Cardinal Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Lord Chancellor. Here his merry character and brilliant intellect attracted the notice of the archbishop, who sent him…

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St. Paulinus, Bishop of Nola

(Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus.)

St. Paulinus

Born at Bordeaux about 354; died 22 June, 431. He sprang from a distinguished family of Aquitania and his education was entrusted to the poet Ausonius. He became governor of the Province of Campania, but he soon realized that he could not find in public life the happiness he sought. From 380 to 390 he lived almost entirely in his native land. He married a Spanish lady…

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St. Alban

Stainedglass window of Saint Alban, at St Mary, Sledmere, East Riding of Yorkshire. Photo taken by davewebster14.

Stainedglass window of Saint Alban, at St Mary, Sledmere, East Riding of Yorkshire. Photo taken by davewebster14.

First martyr of Britain, suffered c. 304. The commonly received account of the martyrdom of St. Alban meets us as early as the pages of Bede’s “Ecclesiastical History” (Bk. I, chs. vii and xviii). According to this, St. Alban was a pagan living at Verulamium (now the town of St. Albans in Hertfordshire), when a persecution of the Christians broke out, and a certain cleric flying for his life took refuge in Alban’s house. Alban sheltered him, and after some days, moved by his example, himself received baptism. Later on, when the governor’s emissaries came to search the house, Alban disguised himself in the cloak of his guest…

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St. Etheldreda

Queen of Northumbria; born (probably) about 630; died at Ely, 23 June, 679.

While still very young she was given in marriage by her father, Anna, King of East Anglia, to a certain Tonbert, a subordinate prince, from whom she received as morning gift a tract of land locally known as the Isle of Ely. She never lived in wedlock with Tonbert, however, and for five years after his early death was left to foster her vocation to religion.

Her father then arranged for her a marriage of political…

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Congratulations to Alexander II from the Corps Diplomatique on January 1, 1863. Painted Zichy Mihaly

Pius XI affirms in the encyclical Divini Redemptoris, of March 19, 1937: “It is not true that all have equal rights in civil society. It is not true that there exists no lawful social hierarchy.”

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Rev. Joseph Jusslein, S.J., ed., Social Wellsprings (Milwaukee: Bruce Publishing Co., 1942), Vol. 2, p. 354 in Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents V, p. 484.

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By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

credo knight

This issue is so holy that one feels like delving into it on one’s knees for fear of not dealing with it as one should; but in any case we can see something in this sense.

The point that radiates the beauty of chivalry is the idea that the Holy Sepulcher is being trampled upon, it is in the hands of Mohammedans – and therefore being profaned, vilified etc. – and it is necessary to fight with the drawn sword in order to make this abomination cease. Everybody knows this.

 An angel leading the Crusaders to Jerusalem by Gustave Doré.

An angel leading the Crusaders to Jerusalem by Gustave Doré.

Now, the last point is that in the special grace the Crusaders received, the Holy Sepulcher appears to us – at least as I see it – in a light which is not the common light and above all not the light with which it is described by archeologists and scientists who have cared for and written about the Holy Sepulcher – or even today’s pilgrims. The Holy Sepulcher is considered sacred because of the Person of Our Lord Jesus Christ. So it is the very Person of Our Lord Jesus Christ that is considered almost present in the Holy Sepulcher, and being pierced with a lance, despised, and so forth.

But seen in this perspective, Our Lord Jesus Christ appears in a light that has something divine, with an essential elevation of which man catches a glimpse.

Cristo de Medina Coli: This statue is located high above the main altar in Madrid, Spain. He has real hair. This statue was in the possession of the Moors, since they stole Him. The Catholics wanted Him back, so the Moors put the statue on a scale & said the Catholics could buy Him back in the statue's weight in gold. The friars put 30 pieces of gold on the scale & the scale balanced out. The Moors were furious (they wanted alot of gold, since the statue is very heavy), so they started fighting, but the Catholics won the battle & recovered the statue.

Cristo de Medina Coli: This statue is located high above the main altar in Madrid, Spain. He has real hair. This statue was in the possession of the Moors, since they stole Him. The Catholics wanted Him back, so the Moors put the statue on a scale & said the Catholics could buy Him back in the statue’s weight in gold. The friars put 30 pieces of gold on the scale & the scale balanced out. The Moors were furious (they wanted alot of gold, since the statue is very heavy), so they started fighting, but the Catholics won the battle & recovered the statue.

In other words, someone who in his own essence, in his own nature is ineffably high and elevated and at the same time has a unique dignity which has no parallel or comparison with anything; and Who in spite of this dignity has a sweetness like none other.

This near paradox of an immense elevation that nevertheless receives insult with meekness, makes the elevation shine with an even more special brilliance; a brilliance that belongs not merely to royal elevation. Indeed, because of its meekness this elevation shows a side whereby it is worthy of love, a side that mere grandeur does not have. It is elevation while deigning to incline downward with mercy, consenting to put itself on a level which is not its own, out of love for what is lower. And which, in spite of this kindness, is treated so brutally!

Holy Face of Our LordWhat I find peculiar about this is, you may tell me, ‘but you will find this in any Way of the Cross.’ Not quite, not quite.

The nature of this elevation is something that I think could be symbolized with a kind of … ineffably noble appearance, at the same time profoundly hurt by this injustice beyond all limits. This nobility, so to speak, this absolute transcendentalness is thus miserably wounded and has a hurt which is not wrath but a profound sadness, closed on itself, and which expands and manifests itself through meekness. This is another seeming paradox; for the manifestation of one who has suffered such an offense would not be but rather a hard kick and a curse. Not here. What you see is a profound hurt, unimaginably unjust, but which transpires sweetness; a sweetness, therefore, of a very special moral nature and physiognomy.

The entrance to the Tomb of Our Lord, the Holy Sepulchre, in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem.

The entrance to the Tomb of Our Lord, the Holy Sepulchre, in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem.

Yet this sweetness is conscious that it has been made to conquer. The sweetness itself knows that, before attracting, it moves and cracks the person who is open to it. And then it invites the one who allowed himself to be cracked, to have humility and contrition. And then, having attained his contrition and pardoned him, this sweetness conquers him. And this inaugurates an unheard-of form of conquest.

But in spite of all this that sweetness is brutally rejected!

knight

At this point, what needs to be considered is this. The object of the crusader’s wrath is not the first sin, but the second one. It is the fact that, after sweetness had manifested itself so much, and conquered so much, there were still people who took their malice to the point of trampling all that underfoot; even worse, trampling on it in a definitive way. No sweetness will ever conquer them after that. And therefore, order needs to be reestablished at the tip of the sword! So, at that point combativeness gushes up like a geyser. Only with a gusher of steel!

 

(Excerpt from an MNF, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 1989 – Nobility.org translation)

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The Scotch Bawbee

June 16, 2016

bawbeeIn Scotland the halfpenny is called a “bawbee,” but how it came to receive that name is not a matter of common knowledge. It appears that the first attempt at the portraiture of the unfortunate Mary Queen of Scots was made in her earliest infancy, and her “wee” face was engraved upon the Scottish halfpennies at the time of her coronation in 1543, when she was but nine months old.

Portrait of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, at the age of 12 or 13. Painting by François Clouet

Portrait of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, at the age of 12 or 13. Painting by François Clouet

A number of these small coins are still preserved, and it will be easily understood that the name “bawbee” or baby, was originally given to the coin bearing the baby’s effigy. — Chicago Daily News, 1901

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 529

 

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June 17 – Sobieski

June 16, 2016

John III Sobieski (Polish: Jan III Sobieski, Lithuanian: Jonas Sobieskis; 17 August 1629 – 17 June 1696)

Painting of John III Sobieski by Daniel Schultz

Painting of John III Sobieski by Daniel Schultz

Born at Olesko in 1629; died at Wilanow, 1696; son of James, Castellan of Cracow and descended by his mother from the heroic Zolkiewski, who died in battle at Cecora. His elder brother Mark was his companion in arms from the time of the great Cossack rebellion (1648), and fought at Zbaraz, Beresteczko, and lastly at Batoh where, after being taken prisoner, he was murdered by the Tatars. John, the last of all the family, accompanied Czarniecki in the expedition to Denmark; then, under George Lubomirski, he fought the Muscovites at Cudnow. Lubomirski revolting, he remained faithful to the king (John Casimir), became successively Field Hetman, Grand Marshal, and — after Revera Potocki’s death — Grand Hetman or Commander-in-chief. His first exploit as Hetman was in Podhajce, where, besieged by an army of Cossacks and Tatars, he at his own expense raised 8000 men and stored the place with wheat, baffling the foe so completely that they retired with great loss. When, in 1672, under Michael Wisniowiecki’s…

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June 17 – Founder of the Albertines

June 16, 2016

Saint Brother Albert Chmielowski In Igołomia, on the outskirts of Cracow (Poland), the noble family of Adalbert Chmielowski and Josephine Borzysławska announced on August 20, 1845, the birth of their son Adam (Brother Albert). Mr Chmielowski together with his wife, raised their children in an atmosphere of patriotic ideals, strong faith in God and a […]

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June 17, 1793: Pius VI condemns the revolutionary concepts of liberty and equality

June 16, 2016

Pius VI repeatedly condemned the false concept of liberty and equality. In the Secret Consistory of June 17, 1793, quoting the words of the encyclical Inscrutabilie Divinae Sapientiae of December 25, 1775, he declared: “‘The most perfidious philosophers go farther. They dissolve all those bonds by which human beings are joined to one another and to […]

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June 18 – To make peace, she surrendered her son’s rights to the throne

June 16, 2016

Blessed Theresa of Portugal (born at Coimbra, October 4, 1178 – died at Lorvão, June 18, 1250) Queen of Léon as the first wife of King Alfonso IX of León. She was the oldest daughter of Sancho I of Portugal and Dulce of Aragon. Theresa was the mother to three of Alfonso’s children—two daughters and […]

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June 19 – St. Jean-Louis Bonnard

June 16, 2016

Saint Jean-Louis Bonnard A French missionary and martyr, born 1 March, 1824 at Saint-Christôt-en-Jarret (Diocese of Lyons); beheaded 30 April, 1852. After a collegiate course at Saint Jodard, he entered the seminary of Lyons, which he left at the age of twenty two, to complete his theological studies at the Seminary of the Foreign Missions […]

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June 19 – St. François-Isidore Gagelin

June 16, 2016

Saint François-Isidore Gagelin (10 May 1799 – 17 October 1833) was a French missionary of the Paris Foreign Missions Society in Vietnam. He became the first French martyr of the 19th century in Vietnam. He was born in Montperreux, Doubs. He left for Vietnam in 1821. In 1826, when Emperor Minh Mạng ordered all missionaries […]

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June 19 – Execution of second group of those who believed in the religious exemption, but only at first

June 16, 2016

Carthusian Martyrs – The Second Group After little more than a month after the first group, it was the turn of three leading monks of the London house: Doms Humphrey Middlemore, William Exmew and Sebastian Newdigate, who were to die at Tyburn, London on the 19 June. Newdigate was a personal friend of Henry VIII, […]

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June 19 – Bl. Odo of Cambrai

June 16, 2016

Bl. Odo of Cambrai Bishop and confessor, also called ODOARDUS; born at Orleans, 1050; died at Anchin, 19 June, 1113. In 1087 he was invited by the canons of Tournai to teach in that city, and there soon won a great reputation. He became a Benedictine monk (1095) in St. Martin’s, Tournai, of which be […]

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June 19 – Love Accepts No Limitations

June 16, 2016

St. Juliana Falconieri Born in 1270; died 12 June, 1341. Juliana belonged to the noble Florentine family of Falconieri. Her uncle, St. Alexis Falconieri, was one of the seven founders of the Servite Order. Through his influence she also consecrated herself from her earliest youth to the religious life and the practices of Christian perfection. […]

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June 20 – The Pope Who Was the Son of Another Pope, Also a Saint

June 16, 2016

Pope St. Silverius (Reigned 536-37). Dates of birth and death unknown. He was the son of Pope [St.] Hormisdas who had been married before becoming one of the higher clergy. Silverius entered the service of the Church and was subdeacon at Rome when Pope Agapetus died at Constantinople, 22 April, 536. The Empress Theodora, who […]

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One Should Not Excite Animosity Against the Rich, Inciting the Masses to the Inversion of Order in Society

June 16, 2016

In a letter of June 5, 1929, to the Most Reverend Achille Liénart, Bishop of Lille, the Sacred Congregation of the Council recalls principles of Catholic social doctrine and practical directives of a moral order, issued from the supreme ecclesiastical authority. “Those who boast of the name Christian, be they taken in isolation or as […]

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Video: Trooping the Colour 2016

June 13, 2016

Highlights from Trooping the Colour 2016, also known as The Queen’s birthday parade. On Saturday Queen Elizabeth II and her family marked her official 90th birthday with a parade, a colorful military ceremony and an appearance on the Buckingham Palace balcony. One-year-old Princess Charlotte made her first appearance on the balcony near the queen’s husband, […]

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June 14 – The entire population was slaughtered, except those who embraced Islam

June 13, 2016

Croia A titular see of Albania. Croia (pronounced Kruya, Albanian, “Spring”) stands on the site of Eriboea, a town mentioned by Ptolemy (III, xiii, 13, 41). Georgius Acropolites (lxix) mentions it as a fortress in 1251. A decree of the Venetian senate gave it in 1343 to Marco Barbarigo and his wife. In 1395 it […]

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June 15 – St. Bernard dogs carry his name

June 13, 2016

St. Bernard of Menthon Born in 923, probably in the castle Menthon near Annecy, in Savoy; died at Novara, 1008. He was descended from a rich, noble family and received a thorough education. He refused to enter an honorable marriage proposed by his father and decided to devote himself to the service of the Church. […]

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June 15 – The Northern Crusades

June 13, 2016

The Battle of Lyndanisse was a battle which helped King Valdemar II of Denmark establish the territory of Danish Estonia during the Northern Crusades. Valdemar II defeated the Estonians at Lyndanisse (Estonian: Lindanise), during the Northern Crusades, by orders from the Pope. Read more here.

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June 15, 1215 – Magna Carta

June 13, 2016

Magna Carta The charter of liberties granted by King John of England in 1215 and confirmed with modifications by Henry III in 1216, 1217, and 1225. The Magna Carta has long been considered by the English-speaking peoples as the earliest of the great constitutional documents which give the history of England so unique a character; […]

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June 16 – Death threats meant nothing to him

June 13, 2016

Saint John Francis Regis Born 31 January, 1597, in the village of Fontcouverte (department of Aude); died at la Louvesc, 30 Dec., 1640. His father Jean, a rich merchant, had been recently ennobled in recognition of the prominent part he had taken in the Wars of the League; his mother, Marguerite de Cugunhan, belonged by […]

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Respecting Social Hierarchy for the Greater Good of Individuals and Society

June 13, 2016

From Benedict XV’s letter Soliti nos, of March 11, 1920, to the Most Reverend Luigi Marelli, Bishop of Bergamo: “Let those who are of a lower station and fortune properly understand this: variety of rank in civil society originates from nature, and is finally to be traced back to the will of God, ‘for He […]

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Prince Harry Gets A Scolding While Meeting WWII Veterans

June 9, 2016

According to The Royal Forums: Prince Harry received a telling-off during his visit to Southwark House in Hampshire yesterday, for not completing his outfit with a tie. “Where’s your bloody tie?” 91-year-old veteran Ivor Anderson jokingly scolded the Prince when he first saw him as Harry arrived to meet with 45 World War Two veterans […]

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Royal Rewind – Elizabeth II crowned at Westminster Abbey

June 9, 2016

According to The Crown Chronicles: On this day in 1953, Elizabeth II was crowned at Westminster Abbey. Having become Queen on 6th February 1952, when King George VI died at Sandringham, it took almost 18 months for the coronation ceremony to take place; this was to give ample time for the planning and preparation of […]

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Baron von Guttenberg’s Clear Grasp of Germany’s Collective Sin

June 9, 2016

I went slowly back in to the sickroom. I had to tell Enoch, for he had the right to know. God help me!… “Dearest one…perhaps God wishes you to leave me….” For a long time he seemed to be asleep. Never, for a moment, could I take my eyes from his face—praying for fortitude…. After […]

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At Judgment, the joking knight’s rendering of accounts will be more severe than a prostitute’s

June 9, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira See for example the story of the Orders of Chivalry. From one standpoint it was a synthesis of the history of the Middle Ages. Imagine a heroic knight eventually wounded in the Crusades, who returns to the monastery in a handicapped condition and is thus prevented from repeating his deeds. […]

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June 10 – Anti-pagan Renaissance Saint

June 9, 2016

Bl. Giovanni Dominici (BANCHINI or BACCHINI was his family name). Cardinal, statesman and writer, born at Florence, 1356; died at Buda, 10 July, 1420. He entered the Dominican Order at Santa Maria Novella in 1372 after having been cured, through the intercession of St. Catherine of Siena, of an impediment of speech for which he […]

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June 10 – Most Sublime Figure of Portuguese Literature

June 9, 2016

Luis Vaz de Camões (OR CAMOENS) Born in 1524 or 1525; died 10 June, 1580. The most sublime figure in the history of Portuguese literature, Camões owes his lasting fame to his epic poem “Os Lusiadas,” (The Lusiads); he is remarkable also for the degree of art attained in his lyrics, less noteworthy for his […]

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June 11 – St. Godeberta

June 9, 2016

St. Godeberta Born about the year 640, at Boves, a few leagues from Amiens, in France; died about the beginning of the eighth century, at Noyon (Oise), the ancient Noviomagus. She was very carefully educated, her parents being of noble rank and attached to the court of King Clovis II. When the question of her […]

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June 12 – Saint Guido of Acqui

June 9, 2016

Saint Guido of Acqui (also Wido) (c. 1004 – 12 June 1070) was Bishop of Acqui (now Acqui Terme) in north-west Italy from 1034 until his death. He was born around 1004 to a noble family of the area of Acqui, the Counts of Acquesana, in Melazzo where the family’s wealth was concentrated. He completed […]

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June 12 – He Crowned Charlemagne

June 9, 2016

Pope St. Leo III Date of birth unknown; died 816. He was elected on the very day his predecessor was buried (26 Dec., 795), and consecrated on the following day. It is quite possible that this haste may have been due to a desire on the part of the Romans to anticipate any interference of […]

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June 12 – A certain nobleman had a concubine

June 9, 2016

St. John of Sahagun Hermit, born 1419, at Sahagun (or San Fagondez) in the Kingdom of Leon, in Spain; died 11 June, 1479, at Salamanca; feast 12 June. In art he is represented holding a chalice and host surrounded by rays of light. John, the oldest of seven children, was born of pious and respected […]

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June 13 – He Lived Only 36 Years, But the Whole World Knows Him

June 9, 2016

St. Anthony of Padua Franciscan Thaumaturgist, born at Lisbon, 1195; died at Vercelli, 13 June, 1231. He received in baptism the name of Ferdinand. Later writers of the fifteenth century asserted that his father was Martin Bouillon, descendant of the renowned Godfrey de Bouillon, commander of the First Crusade, and his mother, Theresa Taveira, descendant […]

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Brotherly Treatment Between Superiors and Subordinates Should Not Eliminate the Variety of Conditions and the Diversity of Social Classes

June 9, 2016

[From Benedict XV’s encyclical Ad beatissimi Apostolorum, of November 11, 1914]:   “Human fraternity, indeed, will not remove the diversities of conditions and therefore of classes. This is not possible, just as it is not possible that in an organic body all the members should have one and the same function and the same dignity. […]

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June 9 – St. Columba

June 7, 2016

St. Columba Abbot of Iona, born at Garten, County Donegal, Ireland, 7 December, 521; died 9 June, 597. He belonged to the Clan O’Donnell, and was of royal descent. His father’s name was Fedhlimdh and that of his mother Eithne. On his father’s side he was great-great-grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, an Irish […]

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June 7 – Martyr Prince of the Wends

June 6, 2016

St. Gottschalk (GODESCALCUS). Martyr, Prince of the Wends; died at Lenzen on the Elbe, 7 June 1066. His feast is noted for 7 June in the additions of the Carthusians at Brussels to the martyrology of Usuardus. He was the son of Udo, Prince of the Abrodites who remained a Christian, though a poor one […]

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June 7 – The Crusaders reach the walls of Jerusalem

June 6, 2016

In June of 1099 [the First Crusade] arrived before the walls of Jerusalem, which was then held by the Fatimid Arabs of Egypt. With their usual religious zeal and grim determination, the Christians prepared to attack the walls. Their fighting force had been reduced to 1,200 knights and 10,000 foot soldiers, with a similar number […]

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June 8 – She did what St. Ignatius could not

June 6, 2016

Ven. Anne de Xainctonge Foundress of the Society of the Sisters of St. Ursula of the Blessed Virgin, born at Dijon, 21 November, 1567; died at Dôle, 8 June, 1621. She was the daughter of Jean de Xainctonge, councillor in the Dijon Parliament, and of Lady Marguerite Collard, both of noble birth and virtuous life… […]

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June 8 – Accused of theft and other misconduct

June 6, 2016

St. William of York (WILLIAM FITZHERBERT, also called WILLIAM OF THWAYT). Archbishop of York. Tradition represents him as nephew of King Stephen, whose sister Emma was believed to have married Herbert of Winchester, treasurer to Henry I. William became a priest, and about 1130 he was canon and treasurer of York. In 1142 he was […]

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June 8 – The Noble Countess Who Dedicated Her Life to Bringing Dissolute Women to Repentance

June 6, 2016

Blessed Mary of the Divine Heart (died in Porto, Portugal, June 8, 1899), born Maria Droste zu Vischering, was a noble of Germany and Roman Catholic nun best known for influencing Pope Leo XIII’s consecration of the world to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Pope Leo XIII called this consecration “the greatest act of my […]

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June 9 – A simple palace servant, God confided to her the destiny of nations

June 6, 2016

Blessed Anna Maria Gesualda Antonia Taigi (Maiden name Giannetti.) Venerable Servant of God, born at Siena, Italy, 29 May, 1769; died at Rome, 9 June, 1837. Her parents, Luigi Giannetti and Maria Masi, kept an apothecary shop at Siena, but lost all their fortune and were obliged to go to Rome in search of a […]

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June 9 – Apostle of Brazil

June 6, 2016

St. Joseph Anchieta A famous Jesuit missionary, commonly known as the Apostle of Brazil, born on the Island of Tenerife, in 1553, of noble family; died in Brazil, 1596. After studying in Coimbra, he entered the Society of Jesus, at the age of seventeen, and when a novice nearly ruined his health by his excessive […]

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Although Equal by Nature, Men Should Not Occupy the Same Position in Social Life

June 6, 2016

From Benedict XV’s encyclical Ad beatissimi Apostolorum, of November 11, 1914: Face to face with those to whom either fortune or their own activity  has brought an abundance of wealth stand the proletaires and the workers, inflamed with hatred and jealousy because, although they share the same nature, they are not in the same condition. […]

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The Father of Courtesy and the Son of Chivalry

June 2, 2016

Richard de Beauchamp, the Earl of Warwick was dubbed both “The Father of Courtesy” and “The Son of Chivalry.” Born in 1382, the English nobleman was knighted at the coronation of King Henry IV and succeeded to the Earldom of Warwick.  In 1401 fought for Henry IV against Owen Glendower and the Percys. In 1408 […]

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In the person of Saint Louis, we see the loyalty of a knight

June 2, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira The knight is a loyal warrior. He is loyal even with his adversaries. Saint Louis, King of France, was arrested in a war against the Mohammedans because of a mistake by a brother of his. His brother was leader of a part of the Crusader army and carried out a […]

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