Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor of Aquitaine

[Eleanor of Aquitaine] and Bernard of Clairvaux met in a private room and began their tête-à-tête. Saint and madcap queen—they made an extraordinary pair….
However, Eleanor remained sufficiently self-possessed to tell him composedly what troubled her. “During all the seven years that she had lived with the king she had remained barren, apart from one hope in the early days, which had been quickly dashed; she despaired of ever having the longed-for child.” Would Bernard of Clairvaux intercede for her and move heaven to answer her prayer?

St Bernard of Clairvaux

St Bernard of Clairvaux

His reply was as uncompromising as the fiery gaze which had stemmed her father’s onslaught years before: “Strive for peace within the realm and I promise you that God in his infinite mercy will grant what you request.”
Within a year of this encounter, the kingdom had been purged of strife and a child was born to the royal couple—a daughter whom they christened Marie in honor of the Queen of Heaven.

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Regine Pernoud, Eleanor of Aquitaine, trans. Peter Wiles (New York: Coward-McCann, Inc., 1968), 45-6.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 407

 

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“I Discovered I Had a Soul”

June 30 2014

by Tradición y Acción por un Perú mayor

Tamara Falcó

Tamara Falcó

Imagine a young television journalist who hosted a leading program on current issues and also stood out for her family name, talent, beauty and charm, a considerable fortune, an eminent social position both locally and internationally; who shone in the world of modeling and celebrity, and finally, who was constantly the center of attention at any social event she attended.

Now imagine the same young lady suddenly converted into a fervent Catholic, attending daily Mass and practicing traditional devotions such as the rosary, communion and meditation, daily visits to the Blessed Sacrament, always holy water with her in her purse, committed to campaigning for Christian values ​​in society … while keeping her TV program.

Many would say this is utterly impossible in today’s world.

But they would be dead wrong. It is not only possible but has actually happened as described. The young lady in question, Tamara Falco Preysler, 31, is a Spanish aristocrat, daughter of Carlos Falco y Fernandez of Cordoba, Marquess of Grinon and interviewer and publicist Isabel Preysler. She recounts her conversion process with all simplicity:

“Though young, I’ve had a very eventful life,” she explains. But only now “for the first time I started to fill my solitude with something good.”

“Solitude?,” the puzzled interviewer asks, finding it hard to understand how such a party-goer, celebrated girl could feel lonely.

“Yes, solitude. I have always noticed that after going to a party that I loved a lot, in a dream dress, it was all wonderful but then it was finished and over. I felt there had to be something else. That life was something else. [The party] entertained me but did not fill me. It gave me no energy… Suddenly, I was having highs and lows, going from euphoria to depression.”

Tamara Falco Preysler

“It turns out that I had a soul. I had a soul but did not know it, I was not listening to my soul. I was totally confused.”

Until her conversion she ‘thought of succeeding, succeeding, succeeding …” but gradually realized “that this is not everything.” “That is when I started following Bible readings, praying the Rosary, and then I began feeling better and better.

I did not know Christ. I did not know God made ​​man or that the Virgin Mary is my Mother. I did not know them.”

“Although He has always been with me, because God never leaves you, for a long time I did not feel his presence in my life and was looking for happiness in what the world told me happiness was: travel, money, shopping, boyfriends … I was not happy.”

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Now Tamara has left her large and luxurious Madrid apartment located in the exclusive Campomanes street opposite the Royal Theatre and barely 50 meters from the Plaza de Oriente and the Royal Palace, and moved to a smaller and more modest residence.

Naturally, her conversion came as a bombshell in the most frivolous sectors of Madrid’s high society. And the press, albeit reluctantly, was forced to deal with it. Then Tamara began to be invited to narrate her spiritual journey to audiences of all kinds, especially youth.

The social effect of this event is easy to imagine. But the most interesting part is that she did not abandon her professional and social life. And now she presents herself as a practicing Catholic and even a militant one by supporting, for example, her younger brother, Duarte Falco de la Cierva, 19, who founded an anti-abortion youth movement titled “+ Vida“, which has also caused a profound impact as shown in the video below:

* * *

We have often referred to the encouraging trends in favor of life, family and authentic cultural values that are strengthening throughout the West and placing the current revolution in customs at risk. Like the international media, the Peruvian mediocracy, deeply committed to this revolution, maintains a heavy silence about that reaction.

But no “cordon sanitaire” by the media will prevent this from arriving to Peru with force if only because… it is already here. Witness, for example, the huge crowds that demonstrated in Lima this year against projected bills to decriminalize abortion and introduce same-sex “civil unions.”

Photo of Tamara Falcó by elhormiguerotv

Photo of Tamara Falcó by elhormiguerotv

Accordingly, the more extreme and aggressive the revolution in customs appears, the quicker it will wear out among the public and the greater will be the reaction in the opposite direction. On an individual level, this reaction will make cases such as that of Tamara Falcó multiply and consolidate into an unstoppable current of opinion.

 

Sources:
1. http://www.vanitatis.elconfidencial.com/noticias/2014-01-31/se-alquila-el-antiguo-atico-de-tamara-falco-por-2-800-euros-al-mes_83062/
2.http://www.lecturas.com/articulo/ultima_hora/12531/si_quedo_para_vestir_santos_los_vestire_lacroix.html
3. http://www.telecinco.es/elprogramadeanarosa/corazon/tamara-falco-antes-iba-buscando-felicidad-compras-novios-pero-no-era-feliz_2_1702605063.html

 

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July 31 – St. Germain

July 31, 2014

St. Germain

Statue of St. Germain at Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois Church in Paris.

Statue of St. Germain at Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois Church in Paris.

Bishop of Auxerre, born at Auxerre c. 380; died at Ravenna, 31 July, 448. He was the son of Rusticus and Germanilla, and his family was one of the noblest in Gaul in the latter portion of the fourth century. He received the very best education provided by the distinguished schools of Arles and Lyons, and then went to Rome, where he studied eloquence and civil law. He practised there before the tribunal of the prefect for some years with great success. His high birth and brilliant talents brought him into contact with the court, and he married Eustachia, a lady highly esteemed in imperial circles. The emperor sent him back to Gaul, appointing him one of the six dukes, entrusted with the government of the Gallic provinces. He resided at Auxerre and gave himself up to all the…

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St. Ignatius Loyola

Youngest son of Don Beltrán Yañez de Oñez y Loyola and Marina Saenz de Lieona y Balda.

Born in 1491 at the castle of Loyola above Azpeitia in Guipuscoa; died at Rome, 31 July, 1556.

The saint was baptized Iñigo, after St. Enecus (Innicus), Abbot of Oña: the name Ignatius was assumed in later years, while he was residing in Rome.

St. Ignatius Loyola

I. CONVERSION (1491-1521)

At an early age he was made a cleric. We do not know when, or why he was released from clerical obligations. He was brought up in the household of Juan Velásquez de Cuellar, contador mayor to Ferdinand and Isabella, and in his suite probably attended the court from time to time, though not in the royal service. This was perhaps the time of his greatest dissipation and laxity. He was affected and extravagant about his hair and dress, consumed with the desire of winning glory, and would seem to have been sometimes involved in those darker intrigues, for which handsome young courtiers too often think themselves licensed. How far he went on the downward course is still unproved. The balance of evidence tends to show that his own subsequent humble confessions of having been a great sinner should not be treated as pious exaggerations. But we have…

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St. Helen of Sköfde

Martyr in the first half of the twelfth century. Her feast is celebrated 31 July.

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Her life (Acta SS., July, VII, 340) is ascribed to St. Brynolph, Bishop of Skara, in Sweden (d. 1317). She was of noble family and is generally believed to have been the daughter of the Jarl Guthorm. When her husband died she remained a widow and spent her life in works of charity and piety; the gates of her home were ever open to the needy and the church of Sköfde was almost entirely built at her expense. Her daughter’s husband was a very cruel man, and was in consequence killed by his own servants. His relatives, wishing to avenge his death, examined the servants. These admitted the crime, but falsely…

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St. Alphonsus Liguori

Born at Marianella, near Naples, 27 September, 1696; died at Nocera de’ Pagani, 1 August, 1787.

St. Alphonsus Liguori

St. Alphonsus Liguori

The eighteenth century was not an age remarkable for depth of spiritual life, yet it produced three of the greatest missionaries of the Church, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, St. Paul of the Cross, and St. Alphonsus Liguori.

Though playing the harpsichord as child, St. Alphonsus played the spinet for the rest of his life. Some of the many songs he composed are: A Maria Nostra Speranza, Pe la Nascita di Gesu, Filio Dormi, Mondo piu per me non sei, Evviva Maria, and Partendo dal Mondo.

Though playing the harpsichord as child, St. Alphonsus played the spinet for the rest of his life. Some of the many songs he composed are: A Maria Nostra Speranza, Pe la Nascita di Gesu, Filio Dormi, Mondo piu per me non sei, Evviva Maria, and Partendo dal Mondo.

Alphonsus Mary Antony John Cosmas Damian Michael Gaspard de’ Liguori was born in his father’s country house at Marianella near Naples, on Tuesday, 27 September, 1696. He was baptized two days later in the church of Our Lady of the Virgins, in Naples. The family was an old and noble one, though the branch to which the Saint belonged had become somewhat impoverished. Alphonsus’s father, Don Joseph de’ Liguori was a naval officer and Captain of the Royal Galleys. The Saint’s mother was of Spanish descent, and if, as there can be little doubt, race is an element in individual character, we may see in Alphonsus’s Spanish blood some explanation of the enormous tenacity of purpose which distinguished him from his earliest years. “I know his obstinacy”, his father said of him as a young…

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Saint Eusebius, Bishop of Vercelli, born in Sardinia circa 283; died at Vercelli, Piedmont, August 1, 371.

St. Eusebius of Vercelli

He was made lector in Rome, where he lived some time, probably as a member, or head, of a religious community (Spreitzenhofer, Die Entwickelung des alten Monchtums in Italien, Vienna, 1894, 14 sq.). Later he came to Vercellae, the present Vercelli, and in 340 was unanimously elected bishop of that city by the clergy and the people. He received episcopal consecration at the hands of Pope Julius I on December 15 of the same year.

According to the testimony of St. Ambrose (Ep. lxiii, Ad Vercellenses) he was the first bishop of the West who united monastic with…

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St. Nicodemus

Jesus and St. Nicodemus

Jesus and St. Nicodemus

A prominent Jew of the time of Christ, mentioned only in the Fourth Gospel. The name is of Greek origin, but at that epoch such names were occasionally borrowed by the Jews, and according to Josephus (Ant. of the Jews, XIV, iii, 2) Nicodemus was the name of one of the ambassadors sent by Aristobulus to Pompey. A Hebrew form of the name (Naqdimon) is found in the Talmud. Nicodemus was a Pharisee, and in his capacity of sanhedrist, (John, vii, 50) was a leader of the Jews. Christ, in the interview when Nicodemus came to him by night, calls him a master in Israel. Judging from John xix, 39, Nicodemus must have been a man of means, and it is probable that he wielded a certain influence in the Sanhedrim. Some writers conjecture from his question: “How can a man be born when he is old?”, that he was already advanced in years, but the words are too general to warrant such a conclusion. He appears in this interview as a learned and…

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According to the Royal Correspondent:

On Wednesday, July 23, 2014, Their Majesties King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima of the Netherlands accompanied by the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mr. Mark Rutte, His Royal Highness Prince Laurent of Belgium, the Governor-General of Australia, Mr. Peter Cosgrove, the Australian Foreign Minister, Ms. Julie Bishop, various dignitaries as well as families and friends attended a solemn ceremony at Eindhoven Airbase to witness the arrival of planes from Ukraine carrying the remains of the victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 (MH17).

MH17 was shot down last Thursday, July 17, 2014…

To read the entire article on the Royal Correspondent, please click here.

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According to Hello Magazine:

Throughout the ceremony the royal couple held each other’s hands tight as the coffins were brought off the plane.

The majority of the passengers were Dutch and Wednesday was declared a national day of mourning for the Netherlands.

The king and queen have met family members of the deceased this past week, and last Friday the couple signed the book of condolences…

Britain’s Prince William last week gave a statement on the tragedy. “For all of us who have lost countrymen and women in the tragedy, words cannot do justice to our sense of loss,” William said.

To read the entire article in Hello Magazine, please click here.

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According to Nippon TV:

On Tuesday, July 22nd, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko paid a visit to…a leprosy sanitarium located in the northeastern Japanese city of Tome, Miyagi Prefecture.

The Emperor and Empress have long been concerned about the plight of patients suffering from leprosy, having visited a leprosy sanitarium for the first time in 1968. With this stop, they have now been to all 14 of such sanitariums in Japan.

The couple talked with residents about their experiences, discovering that some have called the place their home for nearly 75 years.

To read the entire article on Nippon TV or to view the video report, please click here.

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Portrait of the Dauphine of France, Princess Marie Adélaïde of Savoy with her son, the future Louis XV.

Portrait of the Dauphine of France, Princess Marie Adélaïde of Savoy with her son, the future Louis XV.

On her deathbed, the duchess of Burgundy heard one of her servants lament:

“God cannot deprive you of life so soon! You are too precious to the nation.”

The duchess replied: “I am a princess today, nothing tomorrow, and will be completely forgotten the day after tomorrow.”

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Edmond Guérard, Dictionnaire encyclopédique d’anécdotes (Paris: Firmin Didot, 1872), Vol. 1, p. 526 (Nobility.org translation).

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 406

 

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Painting of one of the many Churches, Convents, Monasteries and Palaces that were destroyed during the French Revolution. Demolition of Saint Bartholomew Church in Paris 1791, painted by Pierre-Antoine Demachy.

The essence of the Revolutionary spirit is to be found in a famous document produced by the Committee of the Republic, under the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution. There, the authorities of the interior of France declared that all were invited to bring down every tower of every church and of every castle throughout France. As everything was to be equal, not even buildings could be larger, one to the other. Bring down all the richer men; bring down all those who were more intelligent; suppress any aspect of material things that might give the idea of inequality.

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Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, quoted in Tradition, Family Property Association, ed., Egalitarianism: The Metaphysical Value and Religion of Our Days – Social Leveling…Total Leveling (Glasgow: Tradition, Family, Property Association, 2011), xxiii.

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July 28 – St. Samson

July 28, 2014

St. Samson

Bishop and confessor, born in South Wales; died 28 July, 565 (?). The date of his birth is unknown.

Statue of St. Samson of Dol on Caldey Island. Photo by Humphrey Bolton.

Statue of St. Samson of Dol on Caldey Island. Photo by Humphrey Bolton.

His parents whose names are given as Amon of Dyfed and Anna of Gwynedd, were of noble, but not royal, birth. While still an infant he was dedicated to God and entrusted to the care of St. Illtyd, by whom he was brought up in the monastery of Llantwit Major. He showed exceptional talents in his studies, and was eventually ordained deacon and priest by St. Dubric. After this he retired to another monastery, possibly after that on Caldy Island, to practise greater austerities, and some years later became it abbot. About this time some Irish monks who were returning from Rome happened to visit Samson’s monastery. So struck was the abbot by their learning and sanctity that he accompanied them to Ireland, and there remained some time. During his visit he received the submission of an Irish monastery, and, on his return to Wales, sent one of his uncles to act as its superior. His fame as a worker of miracles now attracted so much attention that he resolved to found a new monastery or cell “far from the haunts of men”, and accordingly retired with a few companions to a lonely spot on the banks of the Severn. He was soon discovered, however, and forced by his fellow-countrymen to become abbot of the monastery formerly ruled by St. Germanus; here St. Dubric consecrated him bishop but without appointment to any particular see.

Dol Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Samson de Dol), in Dol-de-Bretagne, Brittany, dedicated to Saint Samson.

Now, being warned by an angel, he determined to leave England and, after some delay, set sail for Brittany. He landed near Dol, and there built a monastery which became the centre of his episcopal work in the district. Business taking him to Paris, he visited King Childebert there, and was nominated by him as Bishop of Dol; Dol, however, did not become a regular episcopal see till about the middle of the ninth century. Samson attained the age of 85 years, and was buried at Dol. Several early lives of Samson exist. The oldest, printed by Mabillon in h is “Acta Sanctorum” from a MS. at Citeaux, and again by the Bollandists, claims to be compiled from information derived from Samson’s contemporaries, which would refer it to about 600. Dom Plaine in the “Analecta Bollandiana” has edited another and fuller life (from MS. Andeg., 719), which he regards as earlier than Mabillion’s. Later lives are numerous.

G. ROGER HUDLESTON (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Olaf Haraldson

Martyr and King of Norway (1015-30), born 995; died 29 July, 1030.

Painting of St. Olaf in San Carlo al Corso, Rome. Photo by G.dallorto

Painting of St. Olaf in San Carlo al Corso, Rome. Photo by G.dallorto

He was a son of King Harald Grenske of Norway. According to Snorre, he was baptized in 998 in Norway, but more probably about 1010 in Rouen, France, by Archbishop Robert. In his early youth he went as a viking to England, where he partook in many battles and became earnestly interested in Christianity. After many difficulties he was elected King of Norway, and made it his object to extirpate heathenism and make the Christian religion the basis of his kingdom. He is the great Norwegian legislator for the Church, and like his ancestor (Olaf Trygvesson), made frequent severe attacks on the old faith and customs, demolishing the temples and building Christian churches in their place. He brought many bishops and priests from England, as King Saint Cnut later did to Denmark. Some few are known by name (Grimkel, Sigfrid, Rudolf, Bernhard). He seems on the whole to have taken the Anglo-Saxon conditions as a…

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Pope Blessed Urban II

Pope Urban II Consecrating the Church of St. Sernin of Toulouse. Painting by Antoine Rivalz

Pope Urban II Consecrating the Church of St. Sernin of Toulouse. Painting by Antoine Rivalz

(Otho, Otto or Odo of Lagery), 1088-1099, born of a knightly family, at Châtillon-sur-Marne in the province of Champagne, about 1042; died 29 July, 1099. Under St. Bruno (afterwards founder of the Carthusians) Otho studied at Reims, where he later became canon and archdeacon. About 1070 he retired to Cluny and was professed there under the great abbot St. Hugh. After holding the office of prior he was sent by St. Hugh to Rome as one of the monks asked for by Gregory VII, and he was of great assistance to Gregory in the difficult task of reforming the Church. In 1078 he became Cardinal Bishop of Ostia and Gregory’s chief adviser and helper. During the years 1082 to 1085 he was legate in France and Germany. While returning to Rome in 1083 he was made prisoner by the Emperor Henry IV, but was soon liberated. Whilst in Saxony (1084-5) he filled many of the vacant sees with men faithful to Gregory and deposed those whom the pope had condemned. He held a great synod at Quedlinburg in Saxony in which the antipope Guibert of Ravenna and his adherents were anathematized by name. Victor III had already been elected when Otho returned to Rome in 1085.

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St. Theobald

St. Theobald of Provins

St. Theobald of Provins

Born at Provins in the Province of Champagne, France, in 1017; died at Salanigo in Italy 30 June, 1066. He was a member of a noble family. In 1054 without the knowledge of his parents he and his friend Walter gave themselves to the life of hermits at Sussy in the Ardennes, then at Pittingen (now Pettingen) in the Diocese of Trier, a district that today belongs to the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. From this place the two made a pilgrimage to Compostella in Spain, and afterwards returned into the territory of Trier. They made a second pilgrimage to Rome. As they returned they desired to go to Palestine by way of Venice, but Walter’s strength failed near Salanigo in the Diocese of Vicenza. They therefore settled in a solitary place near Salanigo. After two years Walter died. A large number of disciples eager for salvation gathered around Theobald, who severed himself more and more from all earthly things. The bishop ordained him priest. His mother…

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According to Expatica:

Belgium’s King Philippe on Tuesday appointed two leading centre-right politicians to lead negotiations on forming a national government, a potentially drawn-out process after elections in May.

The Belgian monarch, who plays an important constitutional role, tasked the Flemish Christian Democrat leader Kris Peeters and the head of the French-speaking Liberals, Charles Michel, to try to form a government together, a palace statement said.

On Sunday, the king had called on the parties to form a federal government as speedily as possible so as to safeguard national unity.

To read the entire article on Expatica, please click here.

______________________

Also of interest:

May 23 – Chevalier of the Order of Leopold

Euthanasia Brings End to Belgian Monarchy

King Philippe of Belgium Signs Child Euthanasia Law

Democrats Heckle Royals

Trust in new King of the Belgians jumps 18% in two months

Republican MPs to boycott king’s swearing-in – Flanders News

King Albert II of Belgium announces he will abdicate on July 21

The privilège du blanc and God’s love for inequality

Fury over Sandhurst”s insult to Mons heroes: Hall renamed after 3million gift from Bahrain king – Lebanon Times

Belgium King Albert II Christmas speech draws parallels with the rise of fascism in the 1930s – BBC News

Belgian prince inspects lions of Menin Gate at memorial – The Canberra Times

News: Belgium’s National Day

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According to The Telegraph:

As soon as he was old enough Buxton volunteered for the Fleet Air Arm and…tasked with protecting the Arctic supply convoys to northern Russia.

…he was credited with a share in shooting down enemy seaplanes.

In a raid on German positions in Norway, he was shot down and ditched in the sea, and was rescued by a destroyer.

On the outbreak of the Korean War, Buxton…flew almost every day — “our targets being road bridges to stop any movement of supplies to the front line”.

Sir Jocelyn Buxton, born August 8 1924, died April 25 2014

To read the entire obituary in The Telegraph, please click here.

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St. Louis washing the feet of the poor. Painting by Louis Jean-Jacques Durameau.

St. Louis washing the feet of the poor. Painting by Louis Jean-Jacques Durameau.

It was the custom of Saint Louis IX to wash the feet of twelve randomly chosen poor men during Holy Week.  One year, a pauper took the ceremonial in quite the literal, not its symbolic sense and admonished the king for not washing his feet properly washed, all the while pointing to the part of his foot in need of further attention. The king knelt down once more and did everything the poor man wanted.

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Edmond Guérard, Dictionnaire encyclopédique d’anécdotes (Paris: Firmin Didot, 1872), Vol. 1, p. 552. (Nobility.org translation.)

 

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 405

 

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Photo of an Anti-Monarchial protestor by Sara Star, during the 2011 Royal tour of Canada.

Photo of an Anti-Monarchical protester by Sara Star, during the 2011 Royal tour of Canada.

The many crises shaking the world today—those of the State, family, economy, culture, and so on—are but multiple aspects of a single fundamental crisis whose field of action is man himself. In other words, these crises have their root in the most profound problems of the soul, from whence they spread to the whole personality of present-day man and all his activities. It is, above all, a crisis of Western and Christian man, but also of other peoples to the degree that Western influence has reached and taken root among them. Subscription22 We call this process, now five centuries old, which is destroying Christian civilization, “the Revolution.” Its profound cause is an explosion of pride and sensuality that has inspired not one system, but, rather, a whole chain of ideological systems essentially egalitarian. The existence of Protestantism, of the French Revolution, and of Communism already shows a great avalanche of egalitarianism that has been inundating the world. However, in regards to the Revolution, we do not only need to show that this massive movement exists and is trying to establish a few equalities, but that there is something more profound.

Members of Anonymous at a protest in Brussels. Sign reads: “We are anonymous, we are legion. Freedom.” Photo taken by Morburre

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, quoted in Tradition, Family Property Association, ed., Egalitarianism: The Metaphysical Value and Religion of Our Days – Social Leveling…Total Leveling (Glasgow: Tradition, Family, Property Association, 2011), xxii.

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July 24 – Chaste Queen

July 24, 2014

 Saint Kinga of Poland Poor Clare and patroness of Poland and Lithuania; born in 1224; died 24 July, 1292, at Sandeck, Poland. She was the daughter of King Bela IV and niece of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, and from her infancy it pleased God to give tokens of the eminent sanctity to which she was […]

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July 24 – Fearless, Courageous, Unswerving

July 24, 2014

Matilda of Canossa Countess of Tuscany, daughter and heiress of the Marquess Boniface of Tuscany, and Beatrice, daughter of Frederick of Lorraine, b. 1046; d. 24 July, 1114. In 1053 her father was murdered. Duke Gottfried of Lorraine, an opponent of the Emperor Henry III, went to Italy and married the widowed Beatrice. But, in […]

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July 24 – St. John Boste

July 24, 2014

Priest and martyr, born of good Catholic family at Dufton, in Westmoreland, about 1544; died at Durham, 24 July, 1594. He studied at Queen’s College, Oxford, 1569-72, became a Fellow, and was received into the Church at Brome, in Suffolk, in 1576. Resigning his Fellowship in 1580, he went to Reims, where he was ordained […]

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July 26 – In memoriam: Princess Tatiana Von Metternich – who called Hitler a “stuffed doll”

July 24, 2014

According to The Telegraph: Princess Tatiana Von Metternich, who died…on July 26, 2006, aged 91, was…one of the most beautiful women of her day… …she witnessed the effect of Nazism on Germany, was close to those involved in the unsuccessful plot to kill Hitler in 1944, and was forced to make a 600-kilometre trek across […]

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July 26 – Blessed John Ingram

July 24, 2014

Blessed John Ingram English martyr, born at Stoke Edith, Herefordshire, in 1565; executed at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 26 July, 1594. He was probably the son of Anthony Ingram of Wolford, Warwickshire, by Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Hungerford. He was educated first in Worcestershire, then at the English College, Reims, at the Jesuit College, Pont-a-Mousson, and at […]

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July 27 – Wanted: Noble Men for the Missions, Never to Return Home

July 24, 2014

Martyrs of Cuncolim On Monday, 25 July, 1583, the village of Cuncolim in the district of Salcete, territory of Goa, India, was the scene of the martyrdom of five religious of the Society of Jesus: Fathers Rudolph Acquaviva, Alphonsus Pacheco, Peter Berno, and Anthony Francis, also Francis Aranha, lay brother. Rudolph Acquaviva was born 2 […]

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Britain’s royal baptism gown: Eight generations of tradition

July 21, 2014

According to The Telegraph: The Victorian gown, which entered the record books having been worn by 62 babies during its lifespan, had humble beginnings. Only last year the gown’s creator was revealed to have been a young woman named Janet Sutherland, the daughter of a coal miner from Falkirk, who died in 1852 at the […]

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Out with the Royal Crest! That Treaty No One Read Before Signing

July 21, 2014

According to LiveLeak.com: Eric Pickles said there was nothing he could do to prevent the emblem from replacing the royal crest on birth, marriage and death certificates. The Communities Secretary warned the move was part of a Brussels plot to brand people as European citizens ‘from cradle to grave’…. He said the plan, contained in […]

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Prince Charles lauds Britain’s quality cheeses

July 21, 2014

According to The Telegraph: ”I remember 20 years ago you could never find a really interesting cheese in this country except Cheddar,” [the Prince of Wales] said. ”But the extraordinary explosion of artisan-made cheeses has been one of the most remarkable things in this country.’’ His Royal Highness is right. To read the full article […]

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July 22 – The Siege of Belgrade (1456)

July 21, 2014

The Siege of Belgrade (or Battle of Belgrade, or Siege of Nándorfehérvár) occurred from July 4 to July 22, 1456. After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. His immediate objective was the border fort of the town of […]

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What Weight Should Be Given to St. Thomas Aquinas’s Arguments Against Equality?

July 21, 2014

A hierarchical and anti-egalitarian spirit is part and parcel of being a Catholic, as is evidenced in the writings of many popes and theologians, with special mention of St. Thomas Aquinas—upon whom Prof. Corrêa de Oliveira bases much of his argumentation. It is not without good reason that he does so: 1. St. Thomas Aquinas […]

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July 21 – Fearless in every sense

July 21, 2014

St. Lorenzo da Brindisi (Also: Lawrence, or Laurence, of Brindisi.) Born at Brindisi in 1559; died at Lisbon on 22 July, 1619. In baptism he received the names of Julius Caesar. Guglielmo de Rossi — or Guglielmo Russi, according to a contemporary writer — was his father’s name; his mother was Elisabetta Masella. Both were […]

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July 21 – He raised the king’s son back to life, but wished to be buried among the criminals

July 21, 2014

St. Arbogast (Gaelic Arascach). St. Arbogast has been claimed as a native of Scotland, but this is owing to a misunderstanding of the name “Scotia”, which until late in the Middle Ages really meant Ireland. He flourished about the middle of the seventh century. Leaving Ireland, as so many other missionaries had done, he settled […]

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July 22 – With his lady’s permission, this lord left court to become a monk, then abbot

July 21, 2014

St. Wandrille [Abbot of Fontenelles, in Normandy.]  He was nearly related to Pepin of Landen and Erchinoald, the two first lords in the kingdom of Austrasia; and in his youth was made count of the palace under Dagobert I. He was humble on the highest pinnacle of honors, and mortified amidst pleasures. To retrieve himself […]

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July 23 – The most celebrated saint of the Northern kingdom

July 21, 2014

St. Bridget of Sweden The most celebrated saint of the Northern kingdoms, born about 1303; died 23 July, 1373. She was the daughter of Birger Persson, governor and provincial judge (Lagman) of Uppland, and of Ingeborg Bengtsdotter. Her father was one of the wealthiest landholders of the country, and, like her mother, distinguished by deep […]

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“Just 17 per cent of 18 to 34 year olds now strongly support a republic”

July 17, 2014

According to The Telegraph: A ten-day royal visit to Australia by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George has triggered a rise in the nation’s support for the monarchy, especially amongst younger Australians. A Newspoll survey found support for Australia becoming a republic has dropped to 40 per cent, the lowest level in […]

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Tower of London, Buckingham and St James’ Palace guards will speak French tomorrow

July 17, 2014

According to RCI: Members of the Ceremonial Guard and dignitaries of the Royal 22e Régiment are to stand guard at Buckingham Palace, St. James’ Palace and the Tower of London on 14, 16 and 18th of July. The Quebec-based R22R…and are Canada’s only completely Francophone regiment. It was also a first for the King’s Guard […]

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Sobieski Comes to the Relief of Vienna

July 17, 2014

On the day after Sobieski’s conference with Zierowski, unknown to them both, a messenger set out at top speed on the long journey from Vienna. Count Thurn covered 350 miles in 11 days, and arrived at the royal residence of Wilanów outside Warsaw on 15 July. Austria was being invaded, its capital city was in […]

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Egalitarianism: The Fundamental Error of Our Times

July 17, 2014

Prof. Corrêa de Oliveira, in his masterly work Revolution and Counter-Revolution, demonstrates that the chaos of the modern world has a cause. It is a profound cause that begets all the evils of the modern world. It has, if you will, its own personality, its own reason for being; and its name is “the Revolution.” […]

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July 17 – When the Saracens attacked Rome…

July 17, 2014

Pope St. Leo IV (Reigned 847-55) A Roman and the son of Radoald, was unanimously elected to succeed Sergius II, and as the alarming attack of the Saracens on Rome in 846 caused the people to fear for the safety of the city, he was consecrated (10 April, 847) without the consent of the emperor. […]

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July 17 – Martyred in the Name of Equality

July 17, 2014

The Sixteen Blessed Teresian Martyrs of Compiègne Guillotined at the Place du Trône Renversé (now called Place de la Nation), Paris, 17 July, 1794. They are the first sufferers under the French Revolution on whom the Holy See has passed judgment, and were solemnly beatified 27 May, 1906. Before their execution they knelt and chanted […]

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July 17 – The day the Tsar was murdered

July 17, 2014

Execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family In the early hours of 17 July 1918, the royal family was awakened around 2:00 am, told to dress, and led down into a half-basement room at the back of the Ipatiev house. The pretext for this move was the family’s safety — that anti-Bolshevik forces were […]

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July 18 – This soldier of hell became a soldier of heaven

July 17, 2014

Godfrey of Bouillon Duke of Lower Lorraine and first King of Jerusalem, son of Eustache II, Count of Boulogne, and of Ida, daughter of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine; born probably at Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1060; died at Jerusalem, 18 July, 1100 (according to a thirteenth-century chronicler, he was born at Baisy, in Brabant; see […]

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July 18 – “Don’t drink water, drink beer” said the bishop

July 17, 2014

Saint Arnulf of Metz Statesman, bishop under the Merovingians, born c. 580; died c. 640. His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia, the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. In the school in which he was placed during his boyhood he excelled through his talent and his good […]

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July 19 – The knight who was afraid of water, but not afraid of martyrdom

July 17, 2014

Blessed Hroznata of Bohemia Founder of the Monasteries of Teplá and Chotěšov, born (c) 1170, died July 14, 1217. In the happy reign of Premysl, – also called Ottacar, – king of Bohemia, among the other magnates of the kingdom the first place at court, next to the king’s magnificence, was held by Hroznata, the […]

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July 19 – Her whole family became saints

July 17, 2014

St. Macrina the Younger Born about 330; died 379. She was the eldest child of Basil the Elder and Emmelia, the granddaughter of St. Macrina the Elder, and the sister of the Cappadocian Fathers, Sts. Basil and Gregory of Nyssa. The last-mentioned has left us a biography of his sister in the form of a […]

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July 19 – Penitent Nobility

July 17, 2014

St. Arsenius Anchorite; born 354, at Rome; died 450, at Troe, in Egypt. Theodosius the Great having requested the Emperor Gratian and Pope Damasus to find him in the West a tutor for his son Arcadius, they made choice of Arsenius, a man well read in Greek literature, member of a noble Roman family, and […]

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July 20 – Carolingian Reformer

July 17, 2014

St. Ansegisus Born about 770, of noble parentage; died 20 July, 833, or 834. At the age of eighteen he entered the Benedictine monastery of Fontanelle (also called St. Vandrille after the name of its founder) in the diocese of Rouen. St. Girowald, a relative of Ansegisus, was then Abbot of Fontanelle. From the beginning […]

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Certain souls only become great when the winds of misfortune blow upon them

July 14, 2014

         “There are certain souls who only become great when blown upon by the winds of misfortune.  Marie Antoinette, who was inconsequent as a princess and unpardonably frivolous in her life as a queen, nonetheless, was surprisingly transformed before the surge of blood and misery that flooded France. Historians will be consumed by admiration upon […]

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Charles V, the Duke of Alba, and Martin Luther

July 14, 2014

When the Protestants refused to accept the decrees of the Council of Trent, Charles V resolved to wage war, defeating them in the battle of Mühlberg on April 24, 1547. The duke of Alba was the commanding general of his troops. Having entered Württemberg, the Emperor asked to see the tomb of Luther, the friar […]

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What Ever Happened to the Liberty Promised in 1789?

July 14, 2014

In his classic work on the French Revolution, Pierre Gaxotte shows the abysmal difference that exists between the respect shows by the Ancien Regime for the legitimate liberties of the individual and the family and the strong inclination of the modern State to meddle in the intimate lives of its citizens, a tendency which appeared […]

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Prince Charles awards Military Cross to “The Bomb Magnet”

July 14, 2014

According to the Mirror: Warrant Officer Class 1 Patrick Hyde – nicknamed The Bomb Magnet – has been awarded a Military Cross in a ceremony at Buckingham Palace Patrick, 38, was given his MC by Prince Charles… Afterwards, the senior soldier – who is Regimental Sergeant Major of the 4th Battalion The Rifles – gave […]

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A Recipe From The Crusaders

July 14, 2014

July 15th is the anniversary of the conquest of Jerusalem by Duke Godfrey of Bouillon and the First Crusade (1099). We thus offer our readers this panforte (strong bread) recipe, which tradition says hails from Crusader days. Fruits, nuts and honey, all commonly available to Crusaders, are among panforte‘s ingredients. As you bake and enjoy panforte, think of […]

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July 14 – St. Vincent

July 14, 2014

St. Vincent (MALDEGARIUS). Founder and abbot of the monasteries of Hautmont and Soignies, born of a noble family at Strepy les Binche, Hainault, early in the seventh century; died at Soignies, 14 July, 677. That he was not of Irish descent, as stated by Jean du Pont and some Irish writers, has been proved by […]

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July 14 – St. Francis Solanus

July 14, 2014

South American missionary of the Order of Friars Minor; born at Montilla, in the Diocese of Cordova, Spain, 10 March, 1549; died at Lima, Peru, 14 July, 1610. His parents, Matthew Sanchez Solanus and Anna Ximenes, were distinguished no less for their noble birth than for their virtue and piety. When Francis was twenty years […]

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July 14 – The Lily of the Mohawks

July 14, 2014

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Lily of the Mohawks Kateri Tekakwitha was daughter of Kenneronkwa, a Mohawk chief, and Tagaskouita, a devout Roman Catholic Algonquian woman. She was born in the Mohawk fortress of Ossernenon near present-day Auriesville, New York, in 1656. Kateri’s mother was baptized and educated by French missionaries in Trois-Rivières, like many of Abenaki […]

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July 15 – After conversion, he ordered the statues of the pagan gods chopped up and burned

July 14, 2014

St. Vladimir the Great Grand Duke of Kiev (Kieff) and All Russia, grandson of St. Olga, and the first Russian ruler to embrace Christianity, b. 956; d. at Berestova, 15 July, 1015. St. Olga could not convert her son and successor, Sviatoslav, for he lived and died a pagan and brought up his son Vladimir […]

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July 16 – Alfonso VIII of Castile crushes the Moors at Las Navas de Tolosa

July 14, 2014

The Almohads, the new dynasty of Moroccan fanatics who had subdued all the Moslems in al Andalus, launched an all-out attack on the Christians by moving a huge army north into south central Spain. The impetuous Alfonso VIII of Castile, without waiting for reinforcements, attempted to bar the way at Alarcos. On July 18, 1195, […]

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July 16 – Catholic Spain’s fate in the balance at the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa

July 14, 2014

The following year was a memorable one for all Spain. King Alfonso of Castile, in face of the Almohade danger, had launched an alert to Christendom; answering it, the Christian princes had assembled not only from Spain but also from other countries. Pope Innocent III proclaimed a Crusade against the Moors of Spain and bestowed […]

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King Saint Ferdinand Rides to the Conquest of Córdoba

July 10, 2014

A page who entered quickly took him from his thoughts…. “Lord, Ordoño Alvarez de Asturias has come in great haste and says he has happy and marvelous news to give you.” “Ordoño Alvarez, who is stationed at the frontier? Tell him to enter immediately as my door is always open for my knights.” The young […]

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