According to the Crown Chronicles:

An MP made a mockery of his oath of allegiance to Her Majesty on Wednesday, when he called for the abolition of Monarchy just seconds before he swore his service to The Queen.

…[Labour MP Richard Burgon] said this prior to his oath:

‘As someone that believes that the head of state should be elected, I make this oath in order to serve my constituents.’

Burgon has since been called a hypocrite for taking the oath if those were his views, having said he was ‘forced’ to swear his allegiance to Her Majesty.

To read the entire article on the Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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According to Euronews:

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has outlined the government’s legislative agenda, during the official state opening of parliament at Westminster.

“…legislation will be introduced to provide for an in-out referendum on membership of the European Union before the end of 2017.”

The Queen also said that Britain would continue…efforts to defeat terrorism in the Middle East.

The UK will also “maintain pressure” on Russia to “respect the territorial integrity and sovereignty” of Ukraine – and will insist on the full implementation of the Minsk agreements.

The government’s programme will now be debated by the House of Commons and House of Lords.

To read the entire article in Euronews, please click here.

The Queen and Prince Philip in the procession through the Royal Gallery on their way to the chamber of the House of Lords, as part of the State Opening of Parliament.  May 25, 2010. Photo by UK Parliament

The Queen and Prince Philip in the procession through the Royal Gallery on their way to the chamber of the House of Lords, as part of the State Opening of Parliament. May 25, 2010. Photo by UK Parliament

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Painting by by Vincent J.Baptiste Chevilliard.

Painting by by Vincent J.Baptiste Chevilliard.

About a hundred years ago, when the terrible Revolution broke out in France, a certain priest called Father Aurain gave a beautiful example of doing good to one who hated him.

One day he was in the church at his prayers. Suddenly someone ran to tell him that the Republican soldiers were coming towards the church to take him prisoner.

Soldiers of the French Revolution
The priest immediately recommended himself to the protection of God, and tried to make his escape through the sacristy into the garden behind the church.

There two of the soldiers met him; they tried to seize him, but, leaping over the wall, he ran in great haste towards the river about a mile distant. The two soldiers also ran after him.

When the priest came to the banks of the river he looked round, and saw that his enemies were still pursuing him. Without delay he leapt into the water and swam safely to the other side. One of the soldiers attempted to follow him. The priest, seeing this, again began to run, and was soon out of danger.

But as he stopped to rest a little on the top of a hill, he thought he heard cries for help proceeding from the direction of the river. He looked round, and one glance told him all. The soldier who had plunged into the river in pursuit was unable to swim, and was being carried away by the stream.

drowning
In a moment the good priest retraced his steps, plunged once more into the river, and was soon at the side of the drowning man. He seized him by his hair as he was sinking, and drew him to land.

It was some time before the soldier regained consciousness, but when at length he opened his eyes and saw who it was who had saved him he was filled with amazement.

“Who are you ?” he cried out, thinking that perhaps his senses were deceiving him.

“I am Father Aurain, the priest of Figeac,” was the reply.

Valley of d'Astau by Charles Mercereau

“Can it be possible ?” exclaimed the soldier. “I had sworn to take away your life, for I hated you.”

“My child,” replied the priest, “I have never done you any harm; why did you hate me?”

“Because I was told that you hated us and tried to do us all the evil in your power.”

The priest answered, “My child, you have been deceived. What I have now done to you will prove to you that what I say to you is true. You were on the point of perishing while seeking to take away my life, and I have saved you from death. I thank God, Who has given me this opportunity of doing good for evil.”

That soldier afterwards became the priest’s greatest friend.

 

The Catechism In Examples Vol. II, By the Rev. D. Chisholm Pg. 277-279.
Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 476

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Written by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

Rafael Cardinal Merry del ValA manly figure, whose strength is replete with harmony and proportion and whose bodily vigor seems penetrated by and imbued with the strong and luminous presence of a great soul. His facial features are very defined and also well proportioned.

Handsome? Without a doubt. But there is almost no time to analyze his physical beauty because his profound gaze — at once serious, serene, pensive, grave and gentle — so captivates the attention that one hardly notices anything else.

It is the gaze of a thinker and a man of action — a thinker who sees things from the highest summits of philosophy and theology, yet a man of action whose sights are well fixed in reality, who can see deeply into people, things and events. There is a note of melancholy in the gaze, one of firmness and energy in the lips, and a noble, lofty attitude in his whole being. The hands seem made to command.

Everything about this extraordinary man shows us a fighter who has no illusions about the world, who takes a definite stand in face of it, and who is ready for all the battles that life presents. All this is seemingly illuminated by a subtlety of expression and an aristocratic affability that allows us to glimpse the noble and diplomatic character of this man.

Such was the rich personality of he who in this life was called Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val, titular Archbishop of Nicea, who went down in history as the Secretary of State of Saint Pius X.

His Excellency, Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val y Zulueta in 1897.

His Excellency, Rafael Cardinal Merry del Val y Zulueta in 1897.

Descended from an aristocratic line, he was the son of Marquess Merry del Val and the Countess of Zulueta, and in his veins ran illustrious blood from various countries of Europe: Spain, England and Holland. He consecrated himself to the service of the Church, taking Holy Orders and receiving the fullness of the priesthood. In this, he lost nothing of his natural talents. Rather, he elevated them, for the special quality of grace is not to destroy nature, but to elevate and sanctify it. His profound wisdom sprouted from an ardent faith and an admirable piety. His strength was an expression of a supernatural temperance. His dignity was the fruit of a keen consciousness of the respect that he owed himself for so many natural, and principally supernatural, reasons.

In an epoch where the winds of baseness sweep over everything and even try to drag the priesthood into mediocrity — extolling a disparaged, demotic and secularized clergy to the taste of the reigning demagogy — the noble figure of Cardinal Merry del Val presents an admirable model of supernatural dignity that well illustrates the ineffable dignity of the priest in the Church of God. That dignity can shine not only in a prelate like Rafael Merry del Val, but also in the most modest town vicar.

Cardinal Merry del Val and Milenko Vesnić signing the Concordat between the Holy See and Serbia on June 24, 1914 .

Cardinal Merry del Val and Milenko Vesnić signing the Concordat between the Holy See and Serbia on June 24, 1914 .

Christian pride is not the opposite of humility, but rather its harmonious complement.

The Secretary of State of Saint Pius X was a profoundly humble soul, and from him came one of the most beautiful writings on Christian humility.

In this section, where we usually compare two contrasting pictures, today we compare a photograph with a prayer.

Our readers will thus see how a most elevated dignity coexists with a most profound humility in a genuine, supernaturally Catholic heart, in imitation of that Sacred Heart that the Church tells us is at the same time meek, humble and infinitely majestic.

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LITANY OF HUMILITY

O Jesus, meek and humble of heart, hear me.

From the desire of being esteemed,   * deliver me, Jesus.
From the desire of being loved,  *
From the desire of being extolled,  *
From the desire of being honored,  *
From the desire of being praised,  *
From the desire of being preferred,  *
From the desire of being consulted,  *
From the desire of being approved,  *
From the fear of being humiliated,   * deliver me, Jesus.
From the fear of being despised,  *
From the fear of suffering rebukes,  *
From the fear of being calumniated,  *
From the fear of being forgotten,  *
From the fear of being ridiculed,  *
From the fear of being wronged,  *
From the fear of being suspected,  *
That others may be more loved that I,   ** Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.
That others may be esteemed more than I,  **
That in the opinion of the world others may increase and I may decrease,  **
That others may be chosen and I set aside,  **
That others may be praised and I unnoticed,  **
That others may be preferred to me in everything,  **
That others may become holier than I, provided that I may become as holy as I should,    Jesus, grant me the grace to desire it.

 

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St. Maximinus

Bishop of Trier, born at Silly near Poitiers, died there, 29 May, 352 or 12 Sept., 349.

St. MaximinusHe was educated and ordained priest by St. Agritius, whom he succeeded as Bishop of Trier in 332 or 335. At that time Trier was the government seat of the Western Emperor and, by force of his office, Maximinus stood in close relation with the Emperors Constantine II and Constans. He was a strenuous defender of the orthodox faith against Arianism and an intimate friend of St. Athanasius, whom he harboured as an honoured guest during his…

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Saint Ferdinand III of Castile

Saint Ferdinand III of Castile. Painted by Spanish School.King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252. He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX.

In 1217 Ferdinand became King of Castile, which crown his mother renounced in his favor, and in 1230 he succeeded to the crown of Leo…

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St. Joan of Arc

Statue of St. Joan of Arc in New Orleans, Louisiana

In French Jeanne d’Arc; by her contemporaries commonly known as la Pucelle (the Maid).

Born at Domremy in Champagne, probably on 6 January, 1412; died at Rouen, 30 May, 1431. The village of Domremy lay upon the confines of territory which recognized the suzerainty of the Duke of Burgundy, but in the protracted conflict between the Armagnacs (the party of Charles VII, King of France), on the one hand, and the Burgundians in alliance with the English…

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St. Baptista Varano

(also spelled Varani).

An ascetical writer, born at Camerino, in the March of Ancona, 9 Apr., 1458; died there, 31 May, 1527.

Her father, Julius Caesar Varano or de Varanis, Duke of Camerino, belonged to an illustrious family; her mother, Joanna Malatesta, was a daughter of Sigismund, Prince of Rimini…

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St. Mechthildis in the monastery of St. Stephan

St. Mechtildis was a Benedictine abbess and renowned miracle worker. Mechtildis was the daughter of Count Berthold of Andechs, whose wife, Sophie, founded a monastery on their estate at Diessen, Bavaria, and placed their daughter there at the age of five. In 1153, the Bishop of Augsburg placed…

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Bl. John Story

(Or Storey.)

Pembroke College, Oxford

Martyr; born 1504; died at Tyburn, 1 June, 1571. He was educated at Oxford, and was president of Broadgates Hall, now Pembroke College, from 1537 to 1539. He entered Parliament as member for Hindon, Wilts, in 1547, and was imprisoned for opposing the Bill of Uniformity, 24 Jan.-2 March…

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Saint Hannibal Mary Di Francia

Padre Annibale Maria di Francia(1851-1927)  (sometimes written as Annibale Maria Di Francia)

Hannibal Mary Di Francia was born in Messina, Italy, on July 5, 1851. His father Francis was a knight, the Marquis of St. Catherine of Jonio, Papal Vice-Consul and Honorary Captain of the Navy. His mother, Anna Toscano, also belonged to an aristocratic family. The third of four children…

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THE APOSTLE OF ROME

St. Philip Romolo Neri

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Filipe_de_Nery.JPGBorn at Florence, Italy, 22 July, 1515; died 27 May, 1595. Philip’s family originally came from Castelfranco but had lived for many generations in Florence, where not a few of its members had practised the learned professions, and therefore took rank with the Tuscan nobility. Among these was Philip’s own father, Francesco Neri, who eked out an insufficient private fortune with…

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Saint Bruno of Würzburg

(c. 1005 – 26 May 1045)

The statue of Saint Bruno on Würzburg's Alte MainbrückeAlso known as Bruno of Carinthia, he was imperial chancellor of Italy from 1027 to 1034 for Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, to whom he was related, and from 1034 until his death prince-bishop of Würzburg.

Bruno was the son of Conrad I, Duke of Carinthia, and Matilda of Swabia, and thus a cousin of the Salian Emperor Conrad II. He courted Agnes of Poitou on behalf of Conrad’s son and successor Emperor Henry III. He also accompanied Henry on his second Hungarian Campaign, during which Bruno died in an accident at Persenbeug on the Danube in the present Lower Austria…

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St. Augustine of Canterbury

First Archbishop of Canterbury, Apostle of the English; date of birth unknown; died 26 May, 604.

Symbols: cope, pallium, and mitre as Bishop of Canterbury, and pastoral staff and gospels as missionary.

St. AugustineNothing is known of his youth except that he was probably a Roman of the better class, and that early in life he become a monk in the famous monastery of St. Andrew erected by St. Gregory out of his own patrimony on the Cælian Hill. It was thus amid the religious intimacies of the Benedictine Rule and in the bracing atmosphere of a recent foundation that the character of…

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Blessed Margaret Pole

Bl Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, by unknown artist.Countess of Salisbury, martyr; born at Castle Farley, near Bath, 14 August, 1473; martyred at East Smithfield Green, 28 May, 1541.

She was the daughter of George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, and Isabel, elder daughter of the Earl of Warwick (the king-maker), and the sister of Edmund of Warwick who, under Henry VII, paid with his life the penalty of being the last male representative of the Yorkist line (28 Nov., 1499).

About 1491 Henry VII gave her in marriage to Sir Richard Pole, whose mother was the half-sister of the king’s mother, Margaret Beaufort…

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St. William of Gellone

Painting of Saint William of Gellone by Antonio de Pereda

Born 755; died 28 May, c. 812; was the second count of Toulouse, having attained that dignity in 790. He is by some writers also given the title of Duke of Aquitaine. This saint is the hero of the ninth-century “Roman de Guillame au court nez”, but the story of his life is told in a more reliable form by the anonymous author of the biography which was written soon after the saint’s death, or before the eleventh century according to Mabillon, or during the eleventh…

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St. Germain

St. Germanus of ParisBishop of Paris; born near Autun, Saône-et-Loire, c. 496; died at Paris, 28 May, 576. He studied at Avalon and also at Luzy under the guidance of his cousin Scapilion, a priest. At the age of thirty-four he was ordained by St. Agrippinus of Autun and became Abbot of Saint-Symphorien near that town. His characteristic…

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Painting of a Hungarian Nobleman by Mihály Kovács.

Painting of a Hungarian Nobleman by Mihály Kovács

A brave Hungarian Count, by name Péter Szapáry, was taken prisoner by the Turks, brought to the city of Ofen, and dragged before Hamsa-Bey.

The cruel Turk rejoiced to see his dreaded enemy at length in his power; he loaded him with insult, condemned him to receive a hundred blows on the soles of his feet, then to be chained hand and foot, and to be cast into prison. It was a dark and loathsome dungeon. The prisoner’s bed was only moldy straw; his food was so wretched that he was soon reduced to the point of death.

But the cruel Pasha did not want him to die. He desired first only to torture his prisoner, and then to receive a heavy ransom for him. He ordered the prisoner to be cared for till he was restored to health, then to be sent to work in the kitchen.

DungeonOne day Hamsa-Bey asked him in mockery how he felt. Szapáry did not answer him a word, but bore this insult without any signs of anger. At this the Pasha was so enraged that he ordered the brave nobleman to be harnessed to a plough, and to till a neighboring field with another unhappy Catholic, exposed to the strokes of the lash and the jeers of the populace.

Finally, after three long years of cruel martyrdom, Szapáry was given in exchange for a wealthy Turk, who had been taken prisoner by the Hungarians. Szapáry returned home in a most pitiable condition; he was worn to a skeleton, and scarcely able to stand. It was a long time before he was completely restored to health.

plough

Some years after this, it happened that the city of Ofen was captured by the Catholics, and the cruel Hamsa-Bey taken prisoner. The Duke of Lorraine gave him into the hands of Szapáry, to do with him whatever he thought proper. A servant of Szapáry went in haste to the Turk to announce to him the fact. Soon after Szapáry went to the prison in person to visit his cruel enemy.

“Dost thou know me?” he asked. “I am Szapáry.”

“I know it,” answered the Turk sullenly; “now is your time for vengeance.”

“Very well,” answered Szapáry; “I shall take it, but it shall be the Catholics revenge. I now restore you to freedom unconditionally and without ransom.”

The Turk smiled with contempt; he did not believe such noble conduct possible.

The Count's pardon to the Turk“I am a Catholic,” continued Szapáry; “my religion commands me to forgive my enemies, and to return good for evil.”

He then ordered the chains of his enemy to be struck off, and his liberty to be restored to him, for the sake of Him Who was nailed to the cross.

The hardened Turk was completely overcome by such generosity. He fell in agony at the feet of Szapáry. “Your kindness comes too late,” he shrieked. “I have taken poison to escape the tortures which I expected. I now curse myself and my cruelty towards you, and I crave your forgiveness. I wish at least to die a Catholic, since the Catholic religion teaches so sublime a virtue.”

Skilful physicians were speedily called in, but it was too late. Hamsa-Bey was dying; but before he died he was baptized, and Szapáry was his Godfather.

 

The Catechism In Examples Vol. II By the Rev. D. Chisholm Pg. 275-277.
Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 475

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According to the Royal Forums:

Prince Jean d’Orléans, the Duke of Vendome today celebrates his fiftieth birthday. He is the second son of Henri, Count of Paris, the Orléanist claimant to the defunct throne of France, and his first wife, Duchess Marie Thérèse of Württemberg.

Jean…married Philomena de Tornos y Steinhart on May 2, 2009. The couple has three children: Gaston, Antoinette and Louise-Marguerite.

In 2006, Jean was named as the Dauphin of France by his father, a title which is given to the heir to the French throne. This bypasses Jean’s elder brother, who is mentally disabled.

To read the entire article in the Royal Forums, please click here.

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4: The Law of Movement

May 21, 2015

Edmund Rawson and his youngest daughter Dorothy.

Edmund Rawson and his youngest daughter Dorothy.

The variety of movements that God has placed in the Universe is gradual and harmonic, as are the gradations of hierarchy. This harmony of movement is an element of perfection in Creation.

Winston Churchill, aged 7, in Dublin, Ireland.

Winston Churchill, aged 7, in Dublin, Ireland.

Let’s reflect upon how life unfolds in a just man. The man is born, blossoms in adolescence with a movement rich in harmony, and nobly becomes mature; he grows old with dignity and, when God summons his soul, it is like a precious fruit being harvested, only to be born into Heaven. This trajectory is beautiful.

If one was offended by such things, these libertarians preached, that was the problem of the offended person, not the offender.

What does the revolutionary spirit want? It wants that men be children until the day of their death.

What does the revolutionary spirit want? It wants that men be children until the day of their death. Whether well-off or not, all should appear to have the same young age.
The Revolution does not tolerate the Divine plan, which establishes inequality between the ages. Meanwhile, when it is obliged to recognize that it exists, which after all cannot be denied, it seeks to do it with colossal brutality, ignoring the gradations between the ages and despising old age as being worthless, since it produces nothing!

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O Universo é uma Catedral: Excertos do pensamento de Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira recolhidos por Leo Daniele, Edições Brasil de Amanhã, São Paulo, 1997

[Nobility.org Translation]

1: The Laws Of Variety

2: The Law of Contrast

3: The Law of Gradation

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May 23 – Appointed bishop to replace a corrupt one, then imprisoned for defending the King’s legitimate wife

May 21, 2015

St. Ivo of Chartres (YVO, YVES). One of the most notable bishops of France at the time of the Investiture struggles and the most important canonist before Gratian in the Occident, born of a noble family about 1040; died in 1116. From the neighbourhood of Beauvais, his native country, he went for his studies first […]

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May 23 – St. John Baptist de Rossi

May 21, 2015

St. John Baptist de Rossi (De Rubeis). Born at Voltaggio in the Diocese of Genoa, 22 February, 1698; died at Rome, 23 May, 1764; feast on 23 May. His parents, Charles de Rossi and Frances Anfossi, were not rich in earthly goods, but had solid piety and the esteem of their fellow-citizens. Of their four […]

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May 23 – Chevalier of the Order of Leopold

May 21, 2015

Fr. Pierre-Jean De Smet Missionary among the North American Indians, born at Termonde (Dendermonde), Belgium, 30 Jan., 1801; died at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., 23 May, 1873. He emigrated to the United States in 1821 through a desire for missionary labours, and entered the Jesuit novitiate at Whitemarsh, Maryland. In 1823, however, at the suggestion […]

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May 24 – Bl. Hermann Joseph

May 21, 2015

Bl. Hermann Joseph Premonstratensian monk and mystic; born at Cologne about 1150; died at Hoven, 7 April, 1241. According to the biography by Razo Bonvisinus, contemporary prior of Steinfeld (Acta SS., 7 April, I, 679), Hermann was the son of poor parents who had once been rich. At the age of seven he attended school […]

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May 24 – Our Lady Help of Christians, to commemorate the liberation of the Pope from prison

May 21, 2015

This commemoration was introduced in the liturgical calendar by decree of Pope Pius VII on September 16, 1815, in thanksgiving for his happy return to Rome after a long and painful captivity in Savona and France due to Napoleon’s tyrannical power… Read more here.

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May 24 – St. Vincent of Lérins

May 21, 2015

St. Vincent of Lérins Feast on 24 May, an ecclesiastical writer in Southern Gaul in the fifth century. His work is much better known than his life. Almost all our information concerning him is contained in Gennadius, “De viris illustribus” (lxiv). He entered the monastery of Lérins (today Isle St…. Read more here.

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May 25 – He Forced the Emperor To Wait Three Days in the Snow

May 21, 2015

Pope St. Gregory VII (HILDEBRAND). One of the greatest of the Roman pontiffs and one of the most remarkable men of all times; born between the years 1020 and 1025, at Soana, or Ravacum, in Tuscany; died 25 May, 1085, at Salerno. The early years of his life are involved in considerable obscurity. His name, […]

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May 25 – She withstood the devil

May 21, 2015

St. Mary Magdalen de’ Pazzi Carmelite Virgin, born 2 April, 1566; died 25 May, 1607. Of outward events there were very few in the saint’s life. She came of two noble families, her father being Camillo Geri de’ Pazzi and her mother a Buondelmonti. She was baptized, and named Caterina, in the great baptistery. Her […]

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May 19 – Charlemagne’s Scholar

May 18, 2015

Blessed Alcuin of York An eminent educator, scholar, and theologian born about 735; died 19 May, 804. He came of noble Northumbrian parentage, but the place of his birth is a matter of dispute. It was probably in or near York. While still a mere child, he entered the cathedral school founded at that place […]

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May 19 – He Grabbed the Devil By the Nose

May 18, 2015

St. Dunstan of Canterbury Archbishop and confessor, and one of the greatest saints of the Anglo-Saxon Church; born near Glastonbury on the estate of his father, Heorstan, a West Saxon noble. His mother, Cynethryth, a woman of saintly life, was miraculously forewarned of the sanctity of the child within her. She was in the church […]

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May 20 – St. Bernardine of Siena

May 18, 2015

St. Bernardine of Siena Friar Minor, missionary, and reformer, often called the “Apostle of Italy”, b. of the noble family of Albizeschi at Massa, a Sienese town of which his father was then governor, 8 September, 1380; d. at Aquila in the Abruzzi, 20 May, 1444. Left an orphan at six Bernardine was brought up […]

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May 20 – Mentor of the Duke of Ferrara

May 18, 2015

Blessed Colomba of Rieti Born at Rieti in Umbria, Italy, 1467; died at Perugia, 1501. Blessed Colomba of Rieti is always called after her birthplace, though she actually spent the greater part of her life away from it. Her celebrity is based — as it was even in her lifetime — mainly on two things: […]

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May 20 – King of the East Angles

May 18, 2015

St. Ethelbert Date of birth unknown; died 794. King of the East Angles, was, according to the “Speculum Historiale” of Richard of Cirencester (who died about 1401), the son of King Ethelred and Leofrana, a lady of Mercia. Brought up in piety, he was a man of singular humility. Urged to marry, he declared his […]

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May 21- De Soto meets the mighty Mississippi

May 18, 2015

The next day, upon which De Soto was hoping to see the chief, a large company of Indians came, fully armed and in war-paint, with the purpose of attacking the Christians. But when they saw that the Governor had… Read more here.

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May 22 – Hanged for Printing a Book

May 18, 2015

Blessed James Duckett Martyr, born at Gilfortrigs in the parish of Skelsmergh in Westmoreland, England, date uncertain, of an ancient family of that county; died 9 April, 1601. He was a bookseller and publisher in London. His godfather was the well-known martyr James Leybourbe of Skelsmergh. He seems, however, to have been brought up a […]

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May 22 – Queen’s Confessor

May 18, 2015

Blessed John Forest Born in 1471, presumably at Oxford, where his surname was then not unknown; suffered 22 May, 1538. At the age of twenty he received the habit of St. Francis at Greenwich, in the church of the Friars Minor of the Regular Observance, called for brevity’s sake “Observants”. Nine years later we find […]

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Clematis Charlotte named for new Princess

May 14, 2015

According to The Telegraph: Wyevale Garden Centres is launching a double flowering clematis named after Princess Charlotte this week…following the popularity of Clematis George, released after the birth of the first child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in 2013. David Mitchell Plant Buyer at WGC said, “In 2013 the Clematis George was our […]

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Video: Prince Harry training with the Australian Defence Force

May 14, 2015

According to the British Monarchy: Just released today, we have some footage of Prince Harry training with the Australian Defence Force (ADF). His Royal Highness, or Captain Harry Wales as he is known in the Army, spent a month training with the ADF working and living alongside colleagues in the Australian Army in a number […]

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Grand Ducal Family celebrates Luxembourg’s most important religious ceremony

May 14, 2015

According to the Royal Forums: Grand Duchess Maria Teresa was joined by two of her sons…in the morning for the mass at the Cathedrale de Luxembourg held in honour of the event. Later, the family…process[ed] from the Cathedrale to the Grand Ducal Palace… A large number of the public lined the streets to celebrate with […]

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St. Francis de Sales Defends Himself When Attacked

May 14, 2015

St. Francis of Sales, though one of the gentlest of the Saints of God, knew how to defend himself from the swords of his enemies in the day of danger. During his residence in Padua, whither his father had sent him to pursue his studies, it happened that certain young men, who seemed to live […]

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3: The Law of Gradation

May 14, 2015

Divine Providence wanted to create all things in a hierarchy. In making minerals, plants, animals, men, and the angels, Divine Providence established an immense gamut of intermediary degrees within each of these categories. At one and the same time, this hierarchy is full of diversity and entirely harmonic. There is an infinity of “nuances” between […]

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May 14 – Bl. Gil of Santarem

May 14, 2015

Bl. Gil of Santarem A Portuguese Dominican: b. at Vaozela, diocese of Viseu, about 1185; d. at Santarem, 14 May, 1265. His father, Rodrigo Pelayo Valladaris, was governor of Coimbra and councillor of Sancho I. It was the wish of his parents that Gil should enter the ecclesiastical state, and the king was very lavish […]

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May 15 – Beautiful Princess, Tragic Story

May 14, 2015

St. Dymphna Virgin and martyr. The earliest historical account of the veneration of St. Dymphna dates from the middle of the thirteenth century. Under Bishop Guy I of Cambrai (1238-47), Pierre, a canon of the church of Saint Aubert at Cambrai, wrote a “Vita” of the saint, from which we learn that she had been […]

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May 16 – Patron of Poland

May 14, 2015

Saint Andrew Bobola Saint Andrew Bobola earned the name “Hunter of Souls” due to his tireless zeal and missionary travels. Martyr, born of an old and illustrious Polish family, in the Palatinate of Sandomir, 1590; died at Janów, 16 May, 1657. Having entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus at Wilno (1611), he was […]

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May 16 – Leper King

May 14, 2015

Modern society obsessively avoids suffering, risk and danger. It secures everything with seatbelts and safety rails, air conditions the summer heat, prints warnings on coffee cups and advises that that safety glasses should be used while working with hammers. Certainly such precautions have prevented misfortune. However, since heroism and excellence are born from confronting rather […]

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May 16 – St. Honoratus of Amiens

May 14, 2015

Saint Honoratus of Amiens (Honoré, sometimes Honorius, Honortus) (d. May 16, ca. 600) was the seventh bishop of Amiens. His feast day is May 16. He was born in Port-le-Grand (Ponthieu) near Amiens to a noble family. He was said to be virtuous from birth. He was taught by his predecessor in the bishopric of […]

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The Great Siege of Malta, May 18–September 11, 1565, was won because of one man: Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Valette

May 14, 2015

On the morning of August 18th the excessively heavy bombardment of Senglea warned them that an attack was imminent. It was not slow to develop. The moment that the rumble of the guns died down, the Iayalars and Janissaries were seen streaming forward across the no-man’s-land to the south… Read more here.

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May 18 – St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr

May 14, 2015

St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr Eric [1] was descended of a most illustrious Swedish family: in his youth he laid a solid foundation of virtue and learning, and took to wife Christina, daughter of Ingo IV, king of Sweden. Upon the death of King Smercher in 1141, he was, purely for his extraordinary virtues […]

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May 18 – Martyr of Envy

May 14, 2015

Pope St. John I Died at Ravenna on 18 or 19 May (according to the most popular calculation), 526. A Tuscan by birth and the son of Constantius, he was, after an interregnum of seven days, elected on 13 August, 523, and occupied the Apostolic see for two years, nine months, and seven days. We […]

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May 12 – She said no to the crowns of England, France and the Holy Roman Empire

May 11, 2015

Blessed Joanna of Portugal Born at Lisbon, 16 February, 1452; died at Aveiro, 12 May, 1490; the daughter of Alfonso V, King of Portugal, and his wife Elizabeth. She was chiefly remarkable for the courage and persistence with which she opposed all attempts on the part of her father and brother to make her marry.  […]

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May 13 – St. Peter de Regalado

May 11, 2015

St. Peter de Regalado (REGALATUS) A Friar Minor and reformer, born at Valladolid, 1390; died at Aguilera, 30 March, 1456. His parents were of noble birth and conspicuous for their wealth and virtue. Having lost his father in his early youth, he was piously educated by his mother. At the age of ten years Peter […]

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May 13 – “Can anyone receive Jesus into his heart and not die?”

May 11, 2015

Blessed Imelda Lambertini (1322 – May 13, 1333) is the patroness of First Holy Communicants. Imelda was born in 1322 in Bologna, the only child of Count Egano Lambertini and Castora Galuzzi. Her parents were devout Catholics and were known for their charity and generosity to the underprivileged of Bologna. As a very young girl, […]

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May 13 – St. John the Silent

May 11, 2015

St. John the Silent (Hesychastes, Silentiarius). Bishop of Colonia, in Armenia, b. at Nicopolis, Armenia, 8 Jan., 452; d. 558. His parents, Encratius and Euphemia, wealthy and honoured, belonged to families that had done great service in the State and had given to it renowned generals and governors, but they were also good Christian… Read […]

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May 14 – The Right to Revolt

May 11, 2015

May 14, 1264: Simon de Montfort Defeats King Henry III at Battle of Lewes The Battle of Lewes was one of two main battles of the conflict known as the Second Barons’ War. It took place at Lewes in Sussex, on 14 May 1264. It marked the high point of the career of Simon de […]

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May 15 – Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac

May 10, 2015

Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac (December 27, 1556 – February 2, 1640) was founderess of the order The Company of Mary Our Lady. She was born in Bordeaux, France in 1556 to a prominent family. Her father, Richard de Lestonnac, was a member of the French Parliament while her mother, Jeanne Eyquem, was the sister of […]

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“Be Kind To Your Mother”

May 7, 2015

Frederick, King of Prussia, one day rang his bell, and, no one answering, he opened the door and found his page fast asleep in his elbow-chair. He advanced towards him, and was about to waken him, when he perceived a letter hanging out of his pocket. Curiosity prompted him to know what it contained; so […]

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2: The Law of Contrast

May 7, 2015

In order for their beauty to be more complete, things diverse among themselves should manifest a certain contrast, a certain opposition. There is [in the Catholic Church] a magnificent contrast between the Pope, who is at the pinnacle of power and before whom all kneel, and a humble lay brother, who would protest were anyone […]

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May 8 – When St. Michael Appeared

May 7, 2015

Well known is the apparition of St. Michael the Archangel (a. 494 or 530-40), as related in the Roman Breviary, 8 May, at his renowned sanctuary on Monte Gargano, where his original glory as patron in war was restored to him. To his intercession the Lombards of Sipontum (Manfredonia) attributed their victory over the Greek […]

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May 8 – Matriarch of the Carolingian family

May 7, 2015

Saint Itta (or Itta of Metz) (also Ida, Itte or Iduberga) (592–652) was the wife of Pepin of Landen, mayor of the palace of Austrasia. Her brother was Saint Modoald, bishop of Trier. Her sister was abbess Saint Severa. There is no direct record of their parents, but it has been suggested that she was […]

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May 9 – Known personally to the King, he was falsely accused of conspiring to murder him

May 7, 2015

Ven. Thomas Pickering Lay brother and martyr, a member of an old Westmoreland family, born circa 1621; executed at Tyburn, 9 May, 1679. He was sent to the Benedictine monastery of St. Gregory at Douai, where he took vows as a lay brother in 1660. In 1665 he was sent to London, where, as steward […]

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