Church of the Dormition of the Virgin (also called Church of the Tithes) in ruins.  It was the first stone Church in Kiev. The church was ruined in 1240 during the siege of Kiev by Mongol armies of Batu Khan in 1240. Grand Prince Vladimir (Volodymyr) the Great, set aside a tithe of his income and property to finance the church's construction and maintenance, which gave the church its popular name. the church was rebuilt in the mid 19th century, but in 1928 it was once again destroyed by the Soviet regime.

Church of the Dormition of the Virgin (also called Church of the Tithes) in ruins. It was the first stone Church in Kiev. The church was ruined during the siege of Kiev by Tartar armies of Batu Khan in 1240. Grand Prince Vladimir (Volodymyr) the Great, set aside a tithe of his income and property to finance the church’s construction and maintenance, which gave the church its popular name. The church was rebuilt in the mid 19th century, but in 1928 it was once again destroyed by the Soviet regime.

St. Hyacinth had just completed a magnificent church at Kiev, in Poland, which he dedicated to the Most Holy Mother of God. One day as he had just finished the celebration of Holy Mass, it was announced to him that the Tartars, the most implacable enemies of the Christian name, had reached the walls of the town, and were endeavoring to force an entrance. The Saint was much surprised at this information, but he did not allow himself to be disturbed. He feared less the ruin of the city and the church than the outrages without number which these barbarians would inflict on the innocent people, and the sacrileges they would commit against holy things, especially the Most Holy Sacrament of the altar.

Full of confidence in God, he reverently opened the tabernacle, and, taking out the ciborium, he concealed it under his tunic near his heart; then, turning towards the religious who were standing around him trembling with fear, he said to them: “Follow me, my brethren, and be not afraid.”

St. HyacinthBut when he came near the door of the church he heard a loud voice which cried out: “Hyacinth, Hyacinth!” He stood and looked all around, but could see no one, so he turned to continue on his way. Immediately he heard the same voice again saying the same words. Once more he looked behind him, and, to his great astonishment and that of all those who accompanied him, he perceived that it proceeded from the statue of Our Lady, which was placed on an altar near the center of the church. It was made of alabaster, and exceedingly heavy.

“My beloved Hyacinth,” the voice added,” is it thus you are about to deliver my Son from the hands of the barbarians, and to leave His Mother to their impious insults?”

As the Saint answered that it was impossible for him who was so weak to carry a burden which was so heavy, the voice replied: “If you had a little more faith and a little more love for me, it would be very easy for you to carry it.”

Tatars

Tatars

“I desire nothing so much as to possess that love and confidence replied St. Hyacinth. “See, I am ready to obey at once.”

Saying these words, he approached the altar of Our Lady, and with loving respect, stretching out his arms, he placed the statue upon them, and carried it as easily as if it had been a little flower.

It was thus that he left the village, the image of Our Lady in his arms and the holy ciborium on his breast, accompanied by his brethren. He passed unmolested through the ranks of the enemy, who, by the permission of God, stood at a distance, and whose eyes were struck with blindness for a time so that they could not see them.

St. HyacinthWhen they had passed out of the village, they directed their steps towards the city of Cracovia. Here another miracle occurred to console them on their journey. When they reached the banks of the river over which they had to pass, they could find no means of reaching the other side. But full of confidence in the power of the Most Holy Sacrament which he held in one hand, and in the protection of Mary, whose image he carried in the other, he made the sign of the Cross; then, placing his feet on the surface of the waters, he reached the opposite bank without even moistening the soles of his sandals.

The religious who were along with him, seeing repeated the miracle of St. Peter walking on the waters, followed him and also reached the other side of the river, the water not appearing even to touch them.

St. Hyacinth carrying the Blessed Sacrament and the statue of Our Lady across the waters.

St. Hyacinth carrying the Blessed Sacrament and the statue of Our Lady across the waters.

Another miracle still more marvelous is recorded in the process of the canonization of the Saint.

The river over which they thus miraculously passed for a considerable time afterwards continued to show the impression of the Saint’s footsteps.

When St. Hyacinth reached Cracovia, he placed the ciborium on the high altar of the church, and the statue of Our Lady on one of the side altars. Many other wonderful things are recorded to have taken place there through the intercession of Our Lady, which caused many of the people to embrace the true Faith and strengthened and vivified the life of faith in the souls of those who already possessed it.

The Catechism in Examples Vol. 5, Pg. 60-63 by Rev. D. Chisholm

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 441

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The Approaching Storm

November 27, 2014

Uncertainty persists, and storm clouds still loom heavy on the horizon.

Storm clouds still loom heavy on the horizon.

The storm approaches. Each of us has a job to do. On a personal level, we should look for ways to rid ourselves of frenetic intemperance and adopt more organic and temperate lifestyles as a means of preparing for the coming crisis.

One of the many signs from supporters of Traditional Marriage.

One of the many signs from supporters of Traditional Marriage.

Yet more important is to go beyond our personal lives and consider the effect of the storm upon society in general. We should, therefore, endeavor to understand the nature of the storm and join the crusade of ideas and principles that will allow all of us to engage, in any way we can, in the great debate that will decide our course.

Sharia law Billboard

Most important of all is our willingness to sacrifice for our beloved nation and rally around the banner of a return to order in this hour of need. Trusting in Providence, we could well make our own the words of George Washington who, when facing a grave and unavoidable crisis, declared: “Let us raise a standard to which the wise and the honest can repair. The event is in the hand of God.”*

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* Matthew Spalding and Patrick J. Garrity, A Sacred Union of Citizens: George Washington’s Farewell Address and the American Character (Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1996), 27.

 

John Horvat II, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need To Go (York, Penn.: York Press, 2013), 343-4.

 

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Lessons in Psychological Warfare from the Siege of Jasna Góra, November 28-December 27, 1655

This account of the siege of  Częstochowa is based on the Memoirs of the Siege of Czestochowa by Father Augustine Kordecki (Pamietnik oblezenia Częstochowy, edited and with a preface by Jan Tokarski, London, Veritas, 1956.) Written by Friar Kordecki in response to a wish of King Casimir, these memoirs were originally published in Latin in 1658. The analysis and subtitles are by Prof. Plinio Correa de Oliveira.

Jasna Góra

“When God the most High decided to chastise the Poles, in His goodness He first sent various signs warning of the catastrophe which approached.”

So He permitted that, the 10th of February 1654, the high tower of the Sanctuary of Czestochowa be struck by lighting and consumed by fire.

In that same year, on the 9th of July, everyone saw a miracle which occurred in the face of the sun: “In the nose of the…

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Count Louis de Baude Frontenac

A governor of New France, born at Paris, 1662; died at Quebec, 28 Nov., 1698.

Statue of Frontenac at the National Assembly of Québec.

Statue of Frontenac at the National Assembly of Québec.

His father was captain of the royal castle of St-Germain-en-laye; his mother, née Phelypeaux, was the daughter of the king’s secretary of state; Louis XIII was his godfather. By his valour and skill he won the rank of marshall of the king’s camps and armies. He served in Holland, France, Italy and Germany, and also in Candia where Turenne had sent him to command a contingent against the Turks. A brilliant military reputation, therefore, preceeded him to Canada. During his first administration (1672-1682) he built a fort at Cataracouy (now Kingston) to awe the Iroquois and facilitate communications with the West. To explore the course of the Mississippi, previously discovered by Joliet and Marquette, he sent Cavelier de La Salle, who named the country watered by that river Louisiana, in honour of Louis XIV. Although intelligent and magnanimous, brave and unflinching in peril, he was proud, imperious, and ready to sacrifice all to personal animosity. He quarrelled with most of the officials of the colony over petty questions: with his councillors, with the intendant (Duchesneau), with the Governor of Montreal (Perrot), and with Mgr de Laval, whose prohibition of the liquor-traffic with the Indians he judged harmful to commercial interests. The king, after vainly trying to curb his haughtiness, recalled him in 1682.

Frontenac receiving the envoy of Sir William Phipps demanding the surrender of Quebec, 1690

Frontenac receiving the envoy of Sir William Phipps demanding the surrender of Quebec, 1690

In 1689, when the uprising of the Iroquois and the Lachine massacre, in retaliation of Governor Denonville’s treacherous dealing, threatened the existence of the colony, Frontenac was sent to the rescue and was hailed as a deliverer. He had to fight the allied Iroquois and English; but his bravery and ability were equal to the task. After d’Iberville’s brilliant exploits in Hudson Bay, Frontenac divided his forces into three corps, which captured Corlar (Schenectady), Salmon Falls (N.H.) and Casco (Me.). When, to avenge these disasters, Boston sent a fleet against Quebec (1690), Frontenac’s response to the summons of Phipps’s envoy was: “Go tell your master that we shall answer him by the mouths of our guns” – a threat which was made good by the enemy’s defeat. In 1696 Frontenac wisely disregarded the instructions of France to evacuate the upper country, which would have ruined the colony, and merely observed a defensive attitude. He dealt the Iroquois power a severe blow, burned the villages of the Onnontagués and Onneyouts, and devastated their country. By his orders d’Iberville razed Fort Pemquid in Acadia, captured St. John’s, Newfoundland, and nearly the entire island, and took possession of all Hudson Bay Territory. Frontenac died sincerely regretted by the whole colony which he had saved from ruin. His character was a mixture of good and bad qualities. The latter were less evident during his second administration and his talents rendered eminent services. He found Canada weakened and attacked on all sides; he left it in peace, enlarged, and respected. He has been justly called “saver of the country”. In spite of his Jansenistic educataion and prejudices against the bishop, the Jesuits, and even the Sulpicians, he possessed a rich fund of faith and piety. He was a faithful friend of the Recollects, and was buried in their church.

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HOPKINS, “Canada, An Encyclopedia of the Country” (Toronto, 1890); GARNEAU, “Histoire du Canada”(Montreal, 1882); FERLAND, “Cours d’histoire du Canada” (Quebec, 1882); ROCHEMONTEIX, “Les Jésuites et la Nouvelle-France” (Paris, 1896); CHAPAIS, “Jean Talon” (Quebec, 1904); GAUTHIER, “Histoire du Canada” (Quebec, 1876).

LIONEL LINDSAY (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Radbod, Bishop of Utrecht, Confessor

St. Radboud of UtrechtThis holy prelate was, by his father, of noble French extraction; and, by his mother, Radbod, the last king or prince of the Frisons was his great grandfather, whose name was given him by his mother.

The first tincture of learning and piety he received under the tuition of Gunther, bishop of Cologne, his uncle by the…

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St. Louis being crowned King of France at Reims, November 29, 1228.

St. Louis being crowned King of France at Reims, November 29, 1228.

Traditionally, new sacred music was composed for a coronation. The motet…which was sung for the anointing of Louis IX has come down to us. It was called Gaude, felix Francia…. The boy who was to be anointed and crowned was already on a platform built in front of the chancel, surrounded by the great lords of the realm. He declaimed the solemn oath required: to maintain the Church, do justice to his people, keep the peace. The slender figure knelt, then stretched itself prone before the altar, as the chorus took up the Litany of the Saints….

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Général de Charette

Général de Charette

On the night of December 1 [1870], the Zouaves were ordered to advance to Patay [France], where Joan of Arc had won a renowned victory against the English. [General Louis-Gaston de] Sonis asked [Colonel Athanase de] Charette, who had no flag of his own, to lend him…

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Saint Eligius

(French: Eloi), Bishop of Noyon-Tournai, born at Chaptelat near Limoges, France, circa 590, of Roman parents, Eucherius and Terrigia; died at Noyon, December 1, 660.

St Eligius. Statue commissioned by Maneschalchi (guild of farriers). Orsanmichele, Florence.

St Eligius. Statue commissioned by Maneschalchi (guild of farriers). Orsanmichele, Florence.

His father, recognizing unusual talent in his son, sent him to the noted goldsmith Abbo, master of the mint at Limoges. Later Eligius went to Neustria, where he worked under Babo, the royal treasurer, on whose recommendation Clotaire II commissioned him to make a throne of gold adorned with precious stones. His honesty in this so pleased the king that he appointed him master of the mint at Marseilles, besides taking him into his household. After the death of Clotaire (629), Dagobert appointed his father’s friend his chief councillor.

two thrones

St. Eligius with Clotaire II.

The fame of Eligius spread rapidly, and ambassadors first paid their respects to him before going to the king. His success in inducing the Breton King, Judicail, to submit to Frankish authority (636-37) increased his influence. Eligius took advantage of this to obtain alms for the poor and to ransom Roman, Gallic, Breton, Saxon, and Moorish captives, who were arriving daily at Marseilles. He founded several monasteries, and with the king’s consent sent his servants through towns and villages to take down the bodies of malefactors who had been executed, and give them decent burial. Eligius was a source of edification at court, where he and his friend Dado (Audoenus) lived according to the Irish monastic rule, introduced into Gaul by St. Columbanus. Eligius introduced this rule, either entirely or in part, into the monastery of Solignac which he founded in 632, and into the convent at Paris where three hundred virgins were under the guidance of the Abbess Aurea.

The reliquary of St. Eligius in Bruges, Belgium.

The reliquary of St. Eligius in Bruges, Belgium.

He also built the basilica of St. Paul, and restored that of St. Martial in Paris. He erected several fine churches in honor of the relics of St. Martin of Tours, the national saint of the Franks, and St. Denis, who was chosen patron saint by the king. On the death of Dagobert (639), Queen Nanthilde took the reins of government, and Eligius and Dado left the court and entered the priesthood. On the death of Acarius, Bishop of Noyon-Tournai, May 13, 640, Eligius was made his successor with the unanimous approbation of clergy and people. The inhabitants of his diocese were pagans for the most part. He undertook the conversion of the Flemings, Antwerpians, Frisians, Suevi, and the barbarian tribes along the coast. In 654 he approved the famous privilege granted to the Abbey of Saint-Denis, Paris, exempting it from the jurisdiction of the ordinary. In his own episcopal city of Noyon he built and endowed a monastery for virgins. After the finding of the body of St. Quentin, Bishop Eligius erected in his honor a church to which was joined a monastery under the Irish rule. He also discovered the bodies of St. Piatus and companions, and in 654 removed the remains of St. Fursey, the celebrated Irish missionary (d. 650). Eligius was buried at Noyon. There is in existence a sermon written by Eligius, in which he combats the pagan practices of his time, a homily on the last judgment, also a letter written in 645, in which he begs for the prayers of Bishop Desiderius of Cahors. The fourteen other homilies attributed to him are of doubtful authenticity. His homilies have been edited by Krusch in “Mon. Germ. Hist.” (loc. cit. infra).

Queen Saint Balthild of Ascania at the deathbed of St. Eligius.

Queen Saint Balthild of Ascania at the deathbed of St. Eligius.

St. Eligius is particularly honored in Flanders, in the province of Antwerp, and at Tournai, Courtrai of Ghent, Bruges, and Douai. During the Middle Ages his relics were the object of special veneration, and were often transferred to other resting-places, thus in 881, 1066, 1137, 1255, and 1306. He is the patron of goldsmiths, blacksmiths, and all workers in metal. Cabmen have also put themselves under his protection. He is generally represented in Christian art in the garb of a bishop, a crosier in his right hand, on the open palm of his left a miniature church of chased gold.

L. VAN DER ESSEN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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Blessed Richard Langley

Most of England's medieval abbeys and monasteries were destroyed during the Protestant Reformation.

Layman and martyr, b. probably at Grimthorpe, Yorks, England, date unknown; d. at York, 1 Dec., 1586.
From his father, Richard Langley, of Rathorpe Hall, Walton, he probably inherited Rathorpe, but for the greater part of his life continued to reside on his estate at Ousethorpe, in the East Riding. His mother was Joan Beaumont of Mirfield. He married Agnes, daughter of Richard Hansby, New Malton, by whom he had one son, Christopher (b. 1565), and four…

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According to The Guardian:

Prince Charles’ intention to become an “activist” king could force the nation’s political class to rethink the role of the monarchy, MPs have been told.

[Labour MP Roger] Godsiff told parliament on Thursday that “…parliaments…are going to have to decide what the role of the monarchy is in relation to the new constitutional settlement”.

Comments by the prince’s allies that, should he replace his mother, Charles planned to continue speaking out on issues that mattered to him sparked warnings that this could precipitate a constitutional crisis because the monarch would be breaching conventions of political neutrality.

To read the entire article in The Guardian, please click here.

Gerard van Spaendonck Still Life of Roses, Hyacinth, Wallflower and Other Flowers In a Lapis

Gerard van Spaendonck Still Life of Roses, Hyacinth, Wallflower and Other Flowers In a Lapis

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According to Hello Magazine:

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh celebrated their 67th wedding anniversary on Thursday

…the pair have seen the country go through many changes in their 67 years of marriage.

In 1947, rationing was still in place when Elizabeth and Philip’s nuptials took place two years after WWII had finished. Ahead of the wedding, excited brides-to-be from around the country sent the Princess extra coupons so she would be able to have her perfect gown.

However, she returned all the coupons following protocol and was allowed an extra 200 by the Government.

To read the entire article in Hello Magazine, please click here.

HRH Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip

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According to Politico:

Buckingham Palace advises reporters covering the royals to adhere to a certain dress code, according to guidance posted on the palace website.

“Journalists wishing to cover Royal engagements, whether in the United Kingdom or abroad, should comply with the dress code on formal occasions out of respect for the guests of The Queen, or any other member of the Royal Family,” the palace press office requests. “…Those wearing jeans or trainers will not be admitted and casually dressed members of the media will be turned away. This also applies to technicians.”

Time to get your act together, folks.

To read the entire article on Politico, please click here.

To read the entire Buckingham guidelines, please click here.

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The Battle of Fontenoy, 11th May 1745, painted by Horace Vernet.

The Battle of Fontenoy, 11th May 1745, painted by Horace Vernet.

During the battle of Fontenoy, some officers urged Louis XV to leave the battlefield, thus avoiding unnecessary exposure of his royal person to the dangers. He turned down their advice concerned with the harmful effect his leaving would have on the morale of his troops. Right then, the Marshal de Saxe rode up and the king put the issue before him, asking his opinion. The Marshal was indignant and said:

— Your Majesty, who was the coward who gave you this counsel? If we were having this conversation prior to the battle’s start, that is what my advise would have been too, but it is too late now, and besides our situation is not desperate.

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Jacques Necker, Galerie de l’ancienne cour (Maestricht: J. E. Dufour, 1787), Vol. 3, 104. (Nobility.org translation.)

 

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 440

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An Appeal to Sacrifice

November 24, 2014

It is not enough to understand the crisis or even to engage in the debate. The future belongs to those who believe America is worth fighting for.

Iwo Jima flag raisingOurs is an appeal to sacrifice. It is an appeal to leave behind the party of frenetic intemperance that captivates so many with games, gadgets, and amusements—modern bread and circuses. At the same time, we ask Americans to forego their own legitimate self-interest and search for personal happiness. Now is the time to think of the imperiled ship.

Photo of the Winter 2004 DreamHack LAN Party by Toffelginkgo. The event consists of five major components: the festival, the gaming competitions, the digital arts competitions, the live concerts and the expo.

“It is an appeal to leave behind the party of frenetic intemperance that captivates so many with games, gadgets, and amusements—modern bread and circuses.” Photo of the Winter 2004 DreamHack LAN Party by Toffelginkgo. The event consists of five major components, runs for over 4 days, with scheduled activity around the clock. A LAN party is a temporary gathering of people with computers or compatible game consoles, between which they establish a local area network (LAN), primarily for the purpose of playing multiplayer video games.

To save the ship, two things are needed. The first is that there be those who rise to the occasion and bring together the elements to deal with the present crisis. While all should be involved in doing this, our appeal is especially directed to those representative characters, leaders at all levels in society, that naturally embody and unify the aspirations of their families, social groups, or communities. In this time of danger, we ask that they take to heart and use the organic principles in this book as a road map to restructure that America that we are called by Providence to be. It is our hope that these representative characters, as they have done in the past, might quickly bring together and inspire a nation of heroes proportional to the storm we face.

One of the many Rosary Rallies held throughout the US, praying for our country.

One of the many Rosary Rallies held throughout the US, praying for our country.

The second element is a rallying point of unity. One reason why the present crisis looms so large is that we no longer have the points of reference that once oriented our actions. As we have seen, a passion for justice, or the practice of the cardinal virtues, no longer orients economy. Diminished are so many of the landmark institutions of the heart and soul of economy—the family, community, Christian State, and Church. Without the rule of honor, there are no longer those norms of civility, manners, morals, and decency that facilitated the smooth running of societies and economies. In such conditions, is it any wonder that people are perplexed?

Protestors from around the US came to protest the Satanic Black Mass in Oklahoma City, OK 2014.

Protestors from around the US came to protest the Satanic Black Mass in Oklahoma City, OK 2014.

It is time to raise a standard to rally those who are confused by the impending storm. Let order—organic Christian order—be a rallying point. We believe this proven order, which so corresponds to the material and spiritual needs of our nature, can serve as a point of unity and reference in face of the present crisis. Such a standard can reassure countless concerned Americans that they are not alone in their belief that America is not a co-op but a nation worth fighting for.

 

 

John Horvat II, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need To Go (York, Penn.: York Press, 2013), 342-3.

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Queen of Puddings Recipe

November 24, 2014

Portrait of Queen Victoria in her coronation robes and wearing the State Diadem. Painting by Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1845.

Portrait of Queen Victoria in her coronation robes and wearing the State Diadem. Painting by Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1845.

Just as an innocent child associates what is excellent and best with a fabulous queen, a princess, or a king, so also in daily life, we naturally associate superior and sublime things with the uplifting world of royalty and nobility. The “Queen of Puddings” is an example of this trait. It is commonly believed that one of Queen Victoria’s chefs at Buckingham Palace developed this dessert from an older recipe, but whatever may have been its origin, the link with the Queen is fondly remembered by millions, easily enduring the test of time.

 

Queen of Puddings

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crown divider

Queen of Puddings

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups (2 slices) white bread (see note below about the day old bread)

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

4 teaspoon melted butter (1 teaspoon per cup)

2 cups milk

1/4 cup sugar

3 eggs, separated (leave the egg whites in the refrigerator after separating)

1/2 cup raspberry jam, melted (or jam of choice, cherry is good)

2 Tablespoons of sugar

4 ovenproof glass dishes (The dishes have to withstand 350ºF (180ºC).)

 

PREPARATION

* Keep 2 slices of bread out for 2 or 3 days to make them dry. Break them up into bit size once they are dry. *

 

This recipe can be done three ways.

  1. You can divide each ingredient between 4 heatproof bowls.
  2. Add all the ingredients into one bowl and then divide it between 4 heatproof bowls.
  3. Or you can mix all the ingredients into one heatproof dish and bake it altogether, serving it from there, after the baking is complete.

Queen of Puddings

DIRECTIONS

This recipe is written as if you are dividing each ingredient between the 4 bowls.

Divide the breadcrumbs, zest and butter into the 4 heatproof bowls. Heat the milk until just below boiling point, over medium heat for about 5 minutes, and then divide it between the 4 bowls, stirring each one. Allow the crumbs to absorb the milk for 15 minutes. Heat the oven to 350ºF. While the mixture is setting, beat the (reserved) egg yolks with 1/4 cup sugar for 5 minutes. The eggs will be thick and pale.

Add whipped egg yolks to milk mixtures in each bowl, stirring to combine. Place the bowls on a baking tray in the oven for 20-30 minutes until custard is set, but not browned.

Remove the egg whites from the fridge 10 minutes before the timer goes off on the oven. Whisk the egg whites until soft peaks form, then add the 2 Tablespoons of sugar and a pinch of cream of tartar (if your egg whites are becoming stiff, then you don’t have to add the cream of tartar.)

Heat the jam in a small pan on the oven. The bread pudding should be ready now. Remove the bowls from the oven, spread the tops (of each dish) with the warmed jam, being careful not to break the surface of the pudding and spoon the meringue over the tops of the jam. Return to the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes until the meringue is a light brown. Remove the bowls from the baking tray and let them cool slightly on a wire wrack. You can serve warm.

 

Queen of Puddings

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Battle of Montgisard painting by Charles-Philippe Larivière

The Battle of Montgisard was fought between the Ayyubids and the Kingdom of Jerusalem on November 25, 1177. The 16 year old King Baldwin IV, seriously afflicted by leprosy, led an out-numbered Christian force against the army of Saladin. The Islamic force was routed and their casualties were massive, only a fraction managed to flee to safety.

More than wisdom and courage, what made Baldwin IV a great king was his indomitable faith – a virtue he demonstrated at the famous battle of Montgisard. After the attack on Egypt was cancelled, Philip of Flanders took his army to campaign in the northern territories of…

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St. Catherine of Alexandria

A virgin and martyr whose feast is celebrated in the Latin Church and in the various Oriental churches on 25 November, and who for almost six centuries was the object of a very popular devotion.

Painting of St. Catherine by Carlo Crivelli

Of noble birth and learned in the sciences, when only eighteen years old, Catherine presented herself to the Emperor Maximinus who was violently persecuting the Christians, upbraided him for his cruelty and endeavored to prove how iniquitous was the worship of false gods. Astounded at the young girl’s audacity, but incompetent to vie with her in point of…

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Blessed Hugh Taylor

A panoramic view of York in the 15th century.  Watercolour by E. Ridsdale Tate

English martyr, born at Durham; hanged, drawn, and quartered at York, 25 (not 26) November, 1585. He arrived at Reims on 2 May, 1582, and having been ordained a priest was sent thence on the mission on 27 March, 1585. He was the first to suffer under the Statute 27 Eliz. c. 2. lately passed. On 26 November, Marmaduke Bowes, a married gentleman, was hanged for having harboured him. Bowes is described by Challoner as of Angram…

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Queen Isabella I (“The Catholic”)

Queen of Castile; born in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres, 22 April, 1451; died a little before noon, 26 November, 1504, in the castle of La Mota, which still stands at Medina del Campo (Valladolid).

She was the daughter of John II, King of Castile, by his second wife, Isabella of Portugal. Being only a little more than three years of age when her father died (1454), she was brought up carefully and piously by her mother, at Arevalo, until her thirteenth year. Her brother, King Henry…

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Clovis

ClovisSon of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion’s monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres and Cologne. Although a Pagan, Childeric had kept up friendly relations with the bishops of Gaul, and when Clovis ascended the throne he received a most cordial letter of congratulation from St. Remigius, Archbishop of Reims. The young king early began his course of conquest by attacking Syagrius, son of Aegidius, the Roman Count. Having established himself at Soissons, he acquired sovereign authority over so great a part of Northern Gaul as to be known to his contemporaries as the King of Soissons. Syagrius, being defeated, fled for protection to Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, but the latter, alarmed by a summons from Clovis, delivered Syagrius to his conqueror, who had him decapitated in 486. Clovis then remained master of the dominions of Syagrius and took up his residence at Soissons. It would seem as if the episode of the celebrated vase of Soissons were an incident of the campaign against Syagrius, and it proves that, although a pagan, Clovis continued his father’s policy by remaining on amicable terms with Gaulish episcopate. The vase, taken by the…

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The Nobleman In The Tyrol

November 20, 2014

During the seventeenth century a nobleman was dying at Innsbruck, in the Tyrol. A great number of his friends and relations had assembled round his death-bed to wait for the end which they saw approaching. Whilst they were there, the physician gave him a very bitter medicine to drink, and, to encourage him to take […]

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Exploring Organic Alternatives

November 20, 2014

We have also outlined the positive principles of an organic order that lend themselves to personal applications. Our second task consists in evaluating the extent to which we might apply these principles to our personal lives. Organic remedies are accessible to all. Some of these involve very simple things that come naturally to man. We […]

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November 21 – Pope St. Gelasius I

November 20, 2014

Pope St. Gelasius I Died at Rome, 19 Nov., 496. Gelasius, as he himself states in his letter to the Emperor Anastasius (Ep. xii, n. 1), was Romanus natus. The assertion of the “Liber Pontificalis” that he was natione Afer is consequently taken by many to mean that he was of African origin, though Roman […]

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November 21 – St. Albert

November 20, 2014

St. Albert Cardinal, Bishop of Liège, died 1192 or 1193. He was a son of Godfrey III, Count of Louvain, and brother of Henry I, Duke of Lorraine and Brabant, and was chosen Bishop of Liège in 1191 by the suffrages of both people and chapter. The Emperor Henry VI violently intruded his own venal […]

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November 22 – The Eternal Glory of the Caecilia Family

November 20, 2014

St. Cecilia Virgin and martyr, patroness of church music, died at Rome. This saint, so often glorified in the fine arts and in poetry, is one of the most venerated martyrs of Christian antiquity. The oldest historical account of St. Cecilia is found in the “Martyrologium Hieronymianum”; from this it is evident that her feast […]

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November 23 – St. Trudo

November 20, 2014

St. Trudo (also called TRON, TROND, TRUDON, TRUTJEN, TRUYEN). Apostle of Hasbein in Brabant; died 698 (or perhaps 693). Feast 23 November. He was the son of Blessed Adela of the family of the dukes of Austrasia. Devoted from his earliest youth to the service of God, Trudo came to St. Remaclus, Bishop of Liège […]

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November 23 – Blessed Margaret of Savoy

November 20, 2014

Bl. Margaret of Savoy Marchioness of Montferrat, born at Pignerol in 1382; died at Alba, 23 November, 1464. She was the only daughter of Louis of Savoy, Prince of Achaia, and of Bonne, daughter of Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy, and was given in marriage in 1403 to Theodore, Marquis of Montferrat, a descendant of […]

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November 23 – Saint Ferdinand takes Seville

November 20, 2014

The Moors had no choice but to accept the iron will of that King Ferdinand, who, like a curse of Allah, crossed Andalusia exterminating Islam. The ambassadors returned with broader powers to act, and then Don Ferdinand received them. After they had been conducted to his tent, they found him waiting surrounded by his whole […]

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November 24 – Christ the King? Or Christ the President?

November 20, 2014

A heavenly King above all, but a King whose government is already exercised in this world. A King who by right possesses the supreme and full authority. The King makes laws, commands and judges. His sovereignty becomes effective when his subjects recognize his rights, and obey his laws. “Jesus Christ has rights over us all: […]

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November 24 – Saint Joseph Mary Pignatelli, S.J.

November 20, 2014

(also known as St. Giuseppe Maria Pignatelli) Born 27 December, 1737, in Saragossa, Spain; died 11 November, 1811. His family was of Neapolitan descent and noble lineage. After finishing his early studies in the Jesuit College of Saragossa, he entered the Society of Jesus (8 May, 1753) notwithstanding his family’s opposition. On concluding his ecclesiastical […]

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A French nobleman’s finesse at the English court

November 17, 2014

While exiled in England, the Duke of Grammont attended a lunch of Charles II. The protocol of the time demanded that the officers serve the king on their knees. The king noticed the duke’s surprise and commented: ― “This is a sign of respect that no other king receives.” Since, from time immemorial, French and […]

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Accepting Suffering

November 17, 2014

Here we find the secret of the “Way of the Cross” society. With similar rectitude, medieval man logically embraced his own suffering, paying special attention to the hardest part of his situation. This is frequently represented in medieval pictures and stained glass where each is engaged in his craft. All work diligently but without hurry, […]

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November 18 – He Started the Cluniac Reform

November 17, 2014

St. Odo of Cluny Odo was born in 879 in Maine,and was the son of a pious and surprisingly learned layman, Abbo. Though vowed by his father to St. Martin in babyhood, he was given a military training and became a page at the court of Duke William. But the exercises of war and hunting […]

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November 19 – St. Nerses I, Bishop of Armenia, Martyr

November 17, 2014

Nerses I Armenian patriarch, surnamed “the Great”. Died 373. Born of the royal stock, he spent his youth in Caesarea where he married Sanducht, a Mamikonian princess. After the death of his wife, he was appointed chamberlain to King Arshak of Armenia. A few years later, having entered the ecclesiastical state, he was elected catholicos, […]

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November 19 – The Pope Who Resigned

November 17, 2014

Pope St. Pontian Dates of birth and death unknown. The “Liber Pontificalis” (ed. Duchesne, I, 145) gives Rome as his native city and calls his father Calpurnius. With him begins the brief chronicle of the Roman bishops of the third century, of which the author of the Liberian Catalogue of the popes made use in […]

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November 19 – Teacher, Engineer, Army Officer, Prisoner of War, Royal Tutor, and Priest

November 17, 2014

St. Raphael Kalinowski, O.C.D. (1835-1907) [Also known as Father Raphael of St. Joseph, O.C.D] Father Raphael of Saint Joseph Kalinowski, was born at Vilna, 1st September 1835, and at baptism received the name Joseph. Under the teaching of his father Andrew, at the Institute for Nobles at Vilna, he progressed so well that he received […]

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November 20 – Queen Elizabeth II Wedding Anniversary

November 17, 2014

 

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November 20 – St. Edmund the Martyr

November 17, 2014

St. Edmund the Martyr King of East Anglia, born about 840; died at Hoxne, Suffolk, November 20, 870. The earliest and most reliable accounts represent St. Edmund as descended from the preceding kings of East Anglia, though, according to later legends, he was born at Nuremberg (Germany), son to an otherwise unknown King Alcmund of […]

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November 20 – St. Ambrose of Camaldoli

November 17, 2014

St. Ambrose of Camaldoli An Italian theologian and writer, born at Portico, near Florence, 16 September, 1386; died 21 October, 1439. His name was Ambrose Traversari. He entered the Order of the Camaldoli when fourteen and became its General in 1431. He was a great theologian and writer, and knew Greek as well as he […]

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November 20 – Another strong and mighty angel

November 17, 2014

St. Felix of Valois Born in 1127; died at Cerfroi, 4 November, 1212. He is commemorated 20 November. He was surnamed Valois because, according to some, he was a member of the royal branch of Valois in France, according to others, because he was a native of the province of Valois. At an early age […]

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King and Queen at memorial for victims of downed flight MH17

November 13, 2014

According to The Telegraph: “Flags flew at half mast across the Netherlands for an emotional ceremony to pay tribute to MH17 victims attended by the country’s Royal couple King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxima. “The shooting down of MH17, and the deaths of 193 Dutch people, was the country’s worst single loss of life since […]

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The Holy Priest Montegazon

November 13, 2014

During the terrible Revolution that undermined the kingdom of France at the end of last century, a certain holy priest, named Montegazon, was driven from his home by the insurgents, and compelled to flee from village to village. But, faithful to his mission as a priest wherever he went, he gave the consolations of religion […]

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Medieval Uprightness

November 13, 2014

To be like Our Lord Jesus Christ was the ideal that inspired the Middle Ages. Medieval man desired to be linked to Him in the most complete way possible; to lose himself in Him. These sentiments were not only loving movements of admiration and awe. Medieval man took them to their final consequences, reasoning that […]

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November 14 – St. Lawrence O’Toole

November 13, 2014

St. Lawrence O’Toole (Lorcan ua Tuathail; also spelled Laurence O’Toole) Confessor, born about 1128, in the present County Kildare; died 14 November, 1180, at Eu in Normandy; canonized in 1225 by Honorius III. His father was chief of Hy Murray, and his mother one of the Clan O’Byrne. At the age of ten he was […]

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November 14 – Saint Erconwald

November 13, 2014

Saint Erconwald St. Erkenwald instructing monks. A historiated initial from the Chertsey Breviary. Bishop of London, died. about 690. He belonged to the princely family of the East Anglian Offa, and devoted a considerable portion of his patrimony to founding two monasteries, one for monks at Chertsey, and the other for nuns at Barking in […]

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November 15 – Martyred for God (and Money…)

November 13, 2014

Bl. Richard Whiting Last Abbot of Glastonbury and martyr, parentage and date of birth unknown, executed 15 Nov., 1539; was probably educated in the claustral school at Glastonbury, whence he proceeded to Cambridge, graduating as M.A. in 1483 and D.D. in 1505. If, as is probable, he was already a monk when he went to […]

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November 15 – Universal Doctor

November 13, 2014

St. Albert the Great Known as Albert the Great; scientist, philosopher, and theologian, born c. 1206; died at Cologne, 15 November 1280. He is called “the Great”, and “Doctor Universalis” (Universal Doctor), in recognition of his extraordinary genius and extensive knowledge, for he was proficient in every branch of learning cultivated in his day, and […]

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November 15 – Profoundly impressed by the religious atmosphere of his home

November 13, 2014

St. Desiderius of Cahors Bishop, born at Obrege (perhaps Antobroges, name of a Gaulish tribe), on the frontier of the Provincia Narbonnensis, of a noble Frankish family from Aquitaine, which possessed large estates in the territory of Albi; died 15 Nov., 655—though Krusch has called this date in question. In his childhood Desiderius was profoundly… […]

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November 16 – St. Agnes of Assisi

November 13, 2014

St. Agnes of Assisi Younger sister of St. Clare and Abbess of the Poor Ladies, born at Assisi, 1197, or 1198; died 1253. She was the younger daughter of Count Favorino Scifi. Her saintly mother, Blessed Hortulana, belonged to the noble family of the Fiumi, and her cousin Rufino was one of the celebrated “Three […]

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November 16 – St. Margaret of Scotland: In the Middle Ages, the Marvelous Was Something Achievable

November 13, 2014

Saint Margaret of Scotland Commentaries made by Prof. Plinio Correa de Oliveira … Sovereign and patroness of Scotland, 11th century. Although it is a very good intention to comment on the life of St. Margaret, at times one does not have the slightest biographical data on a saint. For lack of a better biography, I […]

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November 16 – St. Mechtilde

November 13, 2014

St. Mechtilde (MATILDA VON HACKEBORN-WIPPRA). Benedictine; born in 1240 or 1241 at the ancestral castle of Helfta, near Eisleben, Saxony; died in the monastery of Helfta, 19 November, 1298. She belonged to one of the noblest and most powerful Thuringian families… Read more here.

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November 16 – St. Gertrude the Great

November 13, 2014

St. Gertrude the Great Saint, Benedictine and mystic writer; born in Germany, January 6, 1256; died at Helfta, near Eisleben, Saxony, November 17, 1301 or 1302. In compliance with a petition from the King of Spain she was declared Patroness of the West Indies; in Peru her feast is celebrated with great pomp, and in […]

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November 17 – St. Hugh of Lincoln

November 13, 2014

St. Hugh of Lincoln Born about the year 1135 at the castle of Avalon, near Pontcharra, in Burgundy; died at London, 16 Nov., 1200. His father, William, Lord of Avalon, was sprung from one of the noblest of Burgundian houses; of his mother, Anna, very little is known. After his wife’s death, William retired from […]

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November 17 – Saint Gregory of Tours

November 13, 2014

Saint Gregory of Tours Born in 538 or 539 at Arverni, the modern Clermont-Ferrand; died at Tours, 17 Nov., in 593 or 594. He was descended from a distinguished Gallo-Roman family, and was closely related to the most illustrious houses of Gaul. He was originally called Georgius Florentius, but in memory of his maternal great-grandfather, […]

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November 17 – The Queen Gave Good Example Caring for the Sick and Suffering

November 13, 2014

St. Elizabeth of Hungary Also called St. Elizabeth of Thuringia, born in Hungary, probably at Pressburg, 1207; died at Marburg, Hesse, 17 November (not 19 November), 1231. She was a daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary (1205-35) and his wife Gertrude, a member of the family of the Counts of Andechs-Meran; Elizabeth’s brother succeeded […]

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Queen braves the threat from Islamist terrorists

November 10, 2014

According to The Telegraph: As police continued to question four men arrested last week over fears of an Islamist plot to attack Remembrance Sunday commemorations, the Queen, politicians and thousands of veterans refused to be distracted from remembering their dead. After a shot from a 13-pounder First World War gun rang out across Horse Guards Parade […]

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Princess Anne at Arlington’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

November 10, 2014

According to The Washington Post: “On her first official visit to the U.S. since 1994, Princess Anne also attended a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.” To read the entire article in The Washington Post, please click here

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Marshal de Villars: Commanding at 81 years of age

November 10, 2014

In 1734, Louis XV declared war on the House of Austria and the Marshal de Villars was chosen to command the combined armies of France, Spain, and Sardinia that were fighting in Italy. In clashes before Pizzigitone, when an officer cautioned that he was exposing himself to many dangers, the Marshal replied: — “You would […]

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Expressions of Tenderness

November 10, 2014

The signs of this tender love could be seen everywhere as medieval man sought to express the infinite perfections of Christ through tangible symbols. Indeed, love seeks nothing except to give itself and to communicate the riches it enjoys. Thus, Taylor observes, “And the same need of grasping the infinite and universal through symbols was […]

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November 11 – Patron of Veterans and Soldiers

November 10, 2014

St. Martin of Tours Bishop; born at Sabaria (today Steinamanger in German, or Szombathely in Hungarian), Pannonia (Hungary), about 316; died at Candes, Touraine, most probably in 397. In his early years, when his father, a military tribune, was transferred to Pavia in Italy, Martin accompanied him thither, and when he reached adolescence was, in […]

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