According to Hello Magazine:

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh celebrated their 67th wedding anniversary on Thursday

…the pair have seen the country go through many changes in their 67 years of marriage.

In 1947, rationing was still in place when Elizabeth and Philip’s nuptials took place two years after WWII had finished. Ahead of the wedding, excited brides-to-be from around the country sent the Princess extra coupons so she would be able to have her perfect gown.

However, she returned all the coupons following protocol and was allowed an extra 200 by the Government.

To read the entire article in Hello Magazine, please click here.

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According to Politico:

Buckingham Palace advises reporters covering the royals to adhere to a certain dress code, according to guidance posted on the palace website.

“Journalists wishing to cover Royal engagements, whether in the United Kingdom or abroad, should comply with the dress code on formal occasions out of respect for the guests of The Queen, or any other member of the Royal Family,” the palace press office requests. “…Those wearing jeans or trainers will not be admitted and casually dressed members of the media will be turned away. This also applies to technicians.”

Time to get your act together, folks.

To read the entire article on Politico, please click here.

To read the entire Buckingham guidelines, please click here.

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The Battle of Fontenoy, 11th May 1745, painted by Horace Vernet.

The Battle of Fontenoy, 11th May 1745, painted by Horace Vernet.

During the battle of Fontenoy, some officers urged Louis XV to leave the battlefield, thus avoiding unnecessary exposure of his royal person to the dangers. He turned down their advice concerned with the harmful effect his leaving would have on the morale of his troops. Right then, the Marshal de Saxe rode up and the king put the issue before him, asking his opinion. The Marshal was indignant and said:

— Your Majesty, who was the coward who gave you this counsel? If we were having this conversation prior to the battle’s start, that is what my advise would have been too, but it is too late now, and besides our situation is not desperate.

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Jacques Necker, Galerie de l’ancienne cour (Maestricht: J. E. Dufour, 1787), Vol. 3, 104. (Nobility.org translation.)

 

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 440

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An Appeal to Sacrifice

November 24, 2014

It is not enough to understand the crisis or even to engage in the debate. The future belongs to those who believe America is worth fighting for.

Iwo Jima flag raisingOurs is an appeal to sacrifice. It is an appeal to leave behind the party of frenetic intemperance that captivates so many with games, gadgets, and amusements—modern bread and circuses. At the same time, we ask Americans to forego their own legitimate self-interest and search for personal happiness. Now is the time to think of the imperiled ship.

Photo of the Winter 2004 DreamHack LAN Party by Toffelginkgo. The event consists of five major components: the festival, the gaming competitions, the digital arts competitions, the live concerts and the expo.

“It is an appeal to leave behind the party of frenetic intemperance that captivates so many with games, gadgets, and amusements—modern bread and circuses.” Photo of the Winter 2004 DreamHack LAN Party by Toffelginkgo. The event consists of five major components, runs for over 4 days, with scheduled activity around the clock. A LAN party is a temporary gathering of people with computers or compatible game consoles, between which they establish a local area network (LAN), primarily for the purpose of playing multiplayer video games.

To save the ship, two things are needed. The first is that there be those who rise to the occasion and bring together the elements to deal with the present crisis. While all should be involved in doing this, our appeal is especially directed to those representative characters, leaders at all levels in society, that naturally embody and unify the aspirations of their families, social groups, or communities. In this time of danger, we ask that they take to heart and use the organic principles in this book as a road map to restructure that America that we are called by Providence to be. It is our hope that these representative characters, as they have done in the past, might quickly bring together and inspire a nation of heroes proportional to the storm we face.

One of the many Rosary Rallies held throughout the US, praying for our country.

One of the many Rosary Rallies held throughout the US, praying for our country.

The second element is a rallying point of unity. One reason why the present crisis looms so large is that we no longer have the points of reference that once oriented our actions. As we have seen, a passion for justice, or the practice of the cardinal virtues, no longer orients economy. Diminished are so many of the landmark institutions of the heart and soul of economy—the family, community, Christian State, and Church. Without the rule of honor, there are no longer those norms of civility, manners, morals, and decency that facilitated the smooth running of societies and economies. In such conditions, is it any wonder that people are perplexed?

Protestors from around the US came to protest the Satanic Black Mass in Oklahoma City, OK 2014.

Protestors from around the US came to protest the Satanic Black Mass in Oklahoma City, OK 2014.

It is time to raise a standard to rally those who are confused by the impending storm. Let order—organic Christian order—be a rallying point. We believe this proven order, which so corresponds to the material and spiritual needs of our nature, can serve as a point of unity and reference in face of the present crisis. Such a standard can reassure countless concerned Americans that they are not alone in their belief that America is not a co-op but a nation worth fighting for.

 

 

John Horvat II, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need To Go (York, Penn.: York Press, 2013), 342-3.

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Queen of Puddings Recipe

November 24, 2014

Portrait of Queen Victoria in her coronation robes and wearing the State Diadem. Painting by Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1845.

Portrait of Queen Victoria in her coronation robes and wearing the State Diadem. Painting by Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1845.

Just as an innocent child associates what is excellent and best with a fabulous queen, a princess, or a king, so also in daily life, we naturally associate superior and sublime things with the uplifting world of royalty and nobility. The “Queen of Puddings” is an example of this trait. It is commonly believed that one of Queen Victoria’s chefs at Buckingham Palace developed this dessert from an older recipe, but whatever may have been its origin, the link with the Queen is fondly remembered by millions, easily enduring the test of time.

 

Queen of Puddings

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crown divider

Queen of Puddings

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups (2 slices) white bread (see note below about the day old bread)

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

4 teaspoon melted butter (1 teaspoon per cup)

2 cups milk

1/4 cup sugar

3 eggs, separated (leave the egg whites in the refrigerator after separating)

1/2 cup raspberry jam, melted (or jam of choice, cherry is good)

2 Tablespoons of sugar

4 ovenproof glass dishes (The dishes have to withstand 350ºF (180ºC).)

 

PREPARATION

* Keep 2 slices of bread out for 2 or 3 days to make them dry. Break them up into bit size once they are dry. *

 

This recipe can be done three ways.

  1. You can divide each ingredient between 4 heatproof bowls.
  2. Add all the ingredients into one bowl and then divide it between 4 heatproof bowls.
  3. Or you can mix all the ingredients into one heatproof dish and bake it altogether, serving it from there, after the baking is complete.

Queen of Puddings

DIRECTIONS

This recipe is written as if you are dividing each ingredient between the 4 bowls.

Divide the breadcrumbs, zest and butter into the 4 heatproof bowls. Heat the milk until just below boiling point, over medium heat for about 5 minutes, and then divide it between the 4 bowls, stirring each one. Allow the crumbs to absorb the milk for 15 minutes. Heat the oven to 350ºF. While the mixture is setting, beat the (reserved) egg yolks with 1/4 cup sugar for 5 minutes. The eggs will be thick and pale.

Add whipped egg yolks to milk mixtures in each bowl, stirring to combine. Place the bowls on a baking tray in the oven for 20-30 minutes until custard is set, but not browned.

Remove the egg whites from the fridge 10 minutes before the timer goes off on the oven. Whisk the egg whites until soft peaks form, then add the 2 Tablespoons of sugar and a pinch of cream of tartar (if your egg whites are becoming stiff, then you don’t have to add the cream of tartar.)

Heat the jam in a small pan on the oven. The bread pudding should be ready now. Remove the bowls from the oven, spread the tops (of each dish) with the warmed jam, being careful not to break the surface of the pudding and spoon the meringue over the tops of the jam. Return to the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes until the meringue is a light brown. Remove the bowls from the baking tray and let them cool slightly on a wire wrack. You can serve warm.

 

Queen of Puddings

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Battle of Montgisard painting by Charles-Philippe Larivière

The Battle of Montgisard was fought between the Ayyubids and the Kingdom of Jerusalem on November 25, 1177. The 16 year old King Baldwin IV, seriously afflicted by leprosy, led an out-numbered Christian force against the army of Saladin. The Islamic force was routed and their casualties were massive, only a fraction managed to flee to safety.

More than wisdom and courage, what made Baldwin IV a great king was his indomitable faith – a virtue he demonstrated at the famous battle of Montgisard. After the attack on Egypt was cancelled, Philip of Flanders took his army to campaign in the northern territories of…

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St. Catherine of Alexandria

A virgin and martyr whose feast is celebrated in the Latin Church and in the various Oriental churches on 25 November, and who for almost six centuries was the object of a very popular devotion.

Painting of St. Catherine by Carlo Crivelli

Of noble birth and learned in the sciences, when only eighteen years old, Catherine presented herself to the Emperor Maximinus who was violently persecuting the Christians, upbraided him for his cruelty and endeavored to prove how iniquitous was the worship of false gods. Astounded at the young girl’s audacity, but incompetent to vie with her in point of…

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Blessed Hugh Taylor

A panoramic view of York in the 15th century.  Watercolour by E. Ridsdale Tate

English martyr, born at Durham; hanged, drawn, and quartered at York, 25 (not 26) November, 1585. He arrived at Reims on 2 May, 1582, and having been ordained a priest was sent thence on the mission on 27 March, 1585. He was the first to suffer under the Statute 27 Eliz. c. 2. lately passed. On 26 November, Marmaduke Bowes, a married gentleman, was hanged for having harboured him. Bowes is described by Challoner as of Angram…

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Queen Isabella I (“The Catholic”)

Queen of Castile; born in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres, 22 April, 1451; died a little before noon, 26 November, 1504, in the castle of La Mota, which still stands at Medina del Campo (Valladolid).

She was the daughter of John II, King of Castile, by his second wife, Isabella of Portugal. Being only a little more than three years of age when her father died (1454), she was brought up carefully and piously by her mother, at Arevalo, until her thirteenth year. Her brother, King Henry…

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Clovis

ClovisSon of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion’s monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres and Cologne. Although a Pagan, Childeric had kept up friendly relations with the bishops of Gaul, and when Clovis ascended the throne he received a most cordial letter of congratulation from St. Remigius, Archbishop of Reims. The young king early began his course of conquest by attacking Syagrius, son of Aegidius, the Roman Count. Having established himself at Soissons, he acquired sovereign authority over so great a part of Northern Gaul as to be known to his contemporaries as the King of Soissons. Syagrius, being defeated, fled for protection to Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, but the latter, alarmed by a summons from Clovis, delivered Syagrius to his conqueror, who had him decapitated in 486. Clovis then remained master of the dominions of Syagrius and took up his residence at Soissons. It would seem as if the episode of the celebrated vase of Soissons were an incident of the campaign against Syagrius, and it proves that, although a pagan, Clovis continued his father’s policy by remaining on amicable terms with Gaulish episcopate. The vase, taken by the…

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The Nobleman In The Tyrol

November 20, 2014

During the seventeenth century a nobleman was dying at Innsbruck, in the Tyrol. A great number of his friends and relations had assembled round his death-bed to wait for the end which they saw approaching.

deathbed

Whilst they were there, the physician gave him a very bitter medicine to drink, and, to encourage him to take it and to lessen the nausea it would cause, he asked him to drink it in memory of the person he loved most.

The Agony in the Garden by Garofalo.

The Agony in the Garden by Garofalo.

The dying man looked around him from one to the other in silence; then, fixing his eyes on a picture hanging on the wall, representing Jesus in the Garden of Olives, he said: “Ah, it is for Thee, my most beloved Friend, that I drink this bitter cup Thee Who for my salvation didst drink the bitter chalice Thy Heavenly Father sent Thee, even to the dregs.”

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The Catechism in Examples Vol. 5, Pg. 53 by Rev. D. Chisholm

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 439

 

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Exploring Organic Alternatives

November 20, 2014

giving

“There is also the practice of virtue, especially the cardinal virtues…” Painting by Gustave Léonard de Jonghe, titled “Kind Heart”.

We have also outlined the positive principles of an organic order that lend themselves to personal applications. Our second task consists in evaluating the extent to which we might apply these principles to our personal lives.

The family visit by Emile Auguste Pinchart.

The family visit by Emile Auguste Pinchart.

Organic remedies are accessible to all. Some of these involve very simple things that come naturally to man. We can cite, for example, any measure that encourages reflection and introspection as something that one can do as part of a return to order. There is also the practice of virtue, especially the cardinal virtues, since simple acts of virtue oppose the rule of “selfish vice” and contribute to an organic order and its passion for justice.

Painting by Arthur Elsley.

Painting by Arthur Elsley.

Any measure, no matter how small, that strengthens the worn social fabric of family, parish, community, or nation is a step towards this organic order. We must encourage any manner of leadership that expresses ties of mutual trust. We should think of concrete ways—by how we dress, speak, and lead—whereby we can truly be representative figures to those who look up to us. This would lead us to discover ways to embrace duty, responsibility, and sacrifice and reject a misguided and selfish individualism. Upon this social framework, an organic economy becomes possible.

Coronation_of_Nicholas_II

As we have shown, an organic order leads to the fullest expression of a person’s individuality, addressing both the material and spiritual needs of the person. Applying organic principles to this individual development means taking measures that favor the rule of honor and its set of values. Among these measures, we can list any concrete means by which we promote that which is excellent and lasting; the cultivation of wholesome intellectual development and debate; or the appreciation of beauty, art, and all things sublime.

We should ponder these personal avenues and then have the courage to adjust our lives accordingly.Subscription1

 

 

John Horvat II, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need To Go (York, Penn.: York Press, 2013), 340-1.

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Pope St. Gelasius I

Died at Rome, 19 Nov., 496. Gelasius, as he himself states in his letter to the Emperor Anastasius (Ep. xii, n. 1), was Romanus natus. The assertion of the “Liber Pontificalis” that he was natione Afer is consequently taken by many to mean that he was of African origin, though Roman born. Others, however, interpreting natione Afer as “African by birth”, explain Romanus natus as “born a Roman citizen”. Before his election as pope, 1 March, 492, Gelasius had been much employed by his predecessor, Felix II (or III), especially in drawing up ecclesiastical documents, which has led some scholars to confuse the writings of the two pontiffs.

Pope St. Gelasius IOn his election to the papacy, Gelasius at once showed his strength of character and his lofty conception of his position by his firmness in dealing with the adherents of Acacius. Despite all the efforts of the otherwise orthodox patriarch, Euphemius of Constantinople, and the threats and wiles by which the Emperor Anastasius tried to obtain recognition from the Apostolic See, Gelasius, though hard-pressed by difficulties at home, would make no peace that compromised in the slightest degree the rights and honor of the Chair of Peter. The constancy with which he combated the pretensions, lay and ecclesiastical, of the New Rome; the resoluteness with which he refused to allow the civil or temporal pre-eminence of a city to determine its ecclesiastical rank; the unfailing courage with which he defended the rights of the “second ” and the “third” sees, Alexandria and Antioch, are some of the most striking features of his pontificate. It has been well said that nowhere at this period can be found stronger arguments for the primacy of Peter’s See than in the works and writings of Gelasius. He is never tired of repeating that Rome owes its ecclesiastical princedom not to an oecumenical synod nor to any temporal importance it may have possessed, but to the Divine institution of Christ Himself, Who conferred the primacy over the whole Church upon Peter and his successors. (Cf. especially his letters to Eastern bishops and the decretal on the canonical and apocryphal books.) In his dealing with the emperor he is at one with the great medieval pontiffs. “There are two powers by which chiefly this world is ruled: the sacred authority of the priesthood and the authority of kings. And of these the authority of the priests is so much the weightier, as they must render before the tribunal of God an account even for the kings of men.” Gelasius’s pontificate was too short to effect the complete submission and reconciliation of the ambitious Church of Byzantium. Not until Hormisdas (514-23) did the contest end in the return of the East to its old allegiance. Troubles abroad were not the only occasions to draw out the energy and strength of Gelasius. The Lupercalia, a superstitious and somewhat licentious vestige of paganism at Rome, was finally abolished by the pope after a long contest. Gelasius’s letter to Andromachus, the senator, covers the main lines of the controversy.

Pope St. Gelasius I

A stanch upholder of the old traditions, Gelasius nevertheless knew when to make exceptions or modifications, such as his decree obliging the reception of the Holy Eucharist under both kinds. This was done as the only effective way of detecting the Manichaeans, who, though present in Rome in large numbers, sought to divert attention from their hidden propaganda by feigning Catholicism. As they held wine to be impure and essentially sinful, they would refuse the chalice and thus be recognized. Later, with the change of conditions, the old normal method of receiving Holy Communion under the form of bread alone returned into vogue. To Gelasius we owe the ordinations on the ember days (Ep. xv), as well as the enforcement of the fourfold division of all ecclesiastical revenues, whether income from estates or voluntary donations of the faithful, one portion for the poor, another for the support of the churches and the splendour of Divine service, a third for the bishop, and the fourth for the minor clergy. Though some writers ascribe the origin of this division of church funds to Gelasius, still the pontiff speaks of it (Ep. xiv, n. 27) as dudum rationabiliter decretum, having been for some time in force. Indeed, Pope Simplicius (475, Ep. i, n. 2) imposed the obligation of restitution to the poor and the Church upon a certain bishop who had failed in this duty; consequently it must have been already regarded as at least a custom of the Church. Not content with one enunciation of this charitable obligation, Gelasius frequently inculcates it in his writings to bishops. For a long time the fixing of the Canon of the Scriptures was attributed to Gelasius, but it seems now more probably the work of Damasus (367-85). As Gelasius, however, in a Roman synod (494), published his celebrated catalogue of the authentic writings of the Fathers, together with a list of apocryphal and interpolated works, as well as the proscribed books of the heretics (Ep. xlii), it was but natural to prefix to this catalogue the Canon of the Scriptures as determined by the earlier Pontiff, and thus in the course of time the Canon itself came to be ascribed to Gelasius. In his zeal for the beauty and majesty of Divine service, Gelasius composed many hymns, prefaces, and collects, and arranged a standard Mass-book, though the Missal that has commonly gone by his name, the “Sacramentarium Gelasianum”, belongs properly to the next century. How much of it is the work of Gelasius is still a moot question. Though pope but for four years and a half, he exerted a deep influence on the development of church polity, of the liturgy and ecclesiastical discipline. A large number of his decrees have been incorporated into the Canon Law.

Pope St. Gelasius IIn his private life Gelasius was above all conspicuous for his spirit of prayer, penance, and study. He took great delight in the company of monks, and was a true father to the poor, dying empty-handed as a result of his lavish charity. Dionysius Exiguus in a letter to his friend, the priest Julian (P.L., LXVII, 231), gives a glowing account of Gelasius as he appeared to his contemporaries.

As a writer Gelasius takes high rank for his period. His style is vigorous and elegant, though occasionally, obscure. Comparatively little of his literary work has come down to us, though he is said to have been the most prolific writer of all the pontiffs of the first five centuries. There are extant forty-two letters and fragments of forty-nine others, besides six treatises, of which three are concerned with the Acacian schism, one with the heresy of the Pelagians, another with the errors of Nestorius and Eutyches, while the sixth is directed against the senator Andromachus and the advocates of the Lupercalia. The best edition is that of Thiel.

The feast of St. Gelasius is kept on 21 Nov., the anniversary of his interment, though many writers give this as the day of his death.

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P.L., LIX, 9-191; CXXVIII, 439; CXXIX, 1210; THIEL, Epistolae Romanorum Pontificum Genuinae (Braunsberg, 1868), I, 285-613, 21-82; JAFFE, Regesta Pontificum Romanorum (Berlin), I, 53-60; DUCHESNE, Le Liber Pontificalis (Paris, 1886) I, 254-257; GRISAR, Geschichte Roms und der Papst eim Mittelalter, I, 452-457, passim; THOENES, De Gelasio I Papa (Wiesbaden, 1873); Roux, Le Pape Gelase (Bordeaux-Paris, 1880). For the Sacramentary of Gelasius see PROBST, Die altesten römischen Sacramentarien und Ordines (Munster, 1892); BISHOP, The Earliest Roman Mass-book in Dublin Review (Octoher, 1894); WILSON. The Gelasian Sacramentary (Oxford, 1894): WILSON, A Classified Index to the Leonine, Gelasian and Gregorian Sacramentaries (Cambridge, 1890); also P.L., LXXIV, 1049.

John F. X. Murphy (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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November 21 – St. Albert

November 20, 2014

St. Albert

Cardinal, Bishop of Liège, died 1192 or 1193.

Archduke Albert kneeling next to his Patron Saint, St. Albert of Louvain by P.P. Rubens.

Archduke Albert kneeling next to his Patron Saint, St. Albert of Louvain by P.P. Rubens.

He was a son of Godfrey III, Count of Louvain, and brother of Henry I, Duke of Lorraine and Brabant, and was chosen Bishop of Liège in 1191 by the suffrages of both people and chapter. The Emperor Henry VI violently intruded his own venal choice into the see, and Albert journeyed to Rome to appeal to Celestine III, who ordained him deacon, created him cardinal, and sent him away with gifts of great value and a letter of recommendation to the Archbishop of Rheims, where he was ordained priest and consecrated bishop. Outside that city, soon after, he was set upon by eight German knights of the Emperor’s following…

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St. Cecilia

Virgin and martyr, patroness of church music, died at Rome.

St. Cecilia in Ecstasy by Raffaello Sanzio

St. Cecilia in Ecstasy by Raffaello Sanzio

This saint, so often glorified in the fine arts and in poetry, is one of the most venerated martyrs of Christian antiquity. The oldest historical account of St. Cecilia is found in the “Martyrologium Hieronymianum”; from this it is evident that her feast was celebrated in the Roman Church in the fourth century. Her name occurs under different dates in the above-mentioned martyrology; its mention under 11 August, the feast of the martyr Tiburtius, is evidently a later and erroneous addition, due to the fact that this Tiburtius, who was buried on the Via Labicana, was wrongly identified with Tiburtius, the brother-in-law of St. Cecilia, mentioned in the Acts of her martyrdom. Perhaps also there was another Roman martyr of the name of Cecilia buried on the Via…

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November 23 – St. Trudo

November 20, 2014

St. Trudo

(also called TRON, TROND, TRUDON, TRUTJEN, TRUYEN).

Apostle of Hasbein in Brabant; died 698 (or perhaps 693). Feast 23 November.

Saint TrudoHe was the son of Blessed Adela of the family of the dukes of Austrasia. Devoted from his earliest youth to the service of God, Trudo came to St. Remaclus, Bishop of Liège (Acta SS., I Sept., 678) and was sent by him to Chlordulph, Bishop of Metz. Here he received his education at the Church of St. Stephen, to which he always showed a strong affection and…

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Bl. Margaret of Savoy

Marchioness of Montferrat, born at Pignerol in 1382; died at Alba, 23 November, 1464.

Blessed Margaret of SavoyShe was the only daughter of Louis of Savoy, Prince of Achaia, and of Bonne, daughter of Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy, and was given in marriage in 1403 to Theodore, Marquis of Montferrat, a descendant of the Greek emperors, the Palæologi, and widower of Jeanne, daughter of the duke of Bar and of Lorraine. Her piety, already great, increased after she had heard the preaching of St. Vincent Ferrer, who spent several months in…

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The Giralda in Seville, which is the bell tower for the Cathedral of Seville.

The Moors had no choice but to accept the iron will of that King Ferdinand, who, like a curse of Allah, crossed Andalusia exterminating Islam. The ambassadors returned with broader powers to act, and then Don Ferdinand received them. After they had been conducted to his tent, they found him waiting surrounded by his whole cortege. The King was wearing his mail coat, broken and mended, and his well darned coat of arms, as he said, “It is not right for a king to dress poorly unless it is a consequence of combat…

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A heavenly King above all, but a King whose government is already exercised in this world. A King who by right possesses the supreme and full authority. The King makes laws, commands and judges. His sovereignty becomes effective when his subjects recognize his rights, and obey his laws.

King of Kings“Jesus Christ has rights over us all: He made laws, he governs the world and will judge men. It is our responsibility to make the kingdom of Christ effective by obeying its laws.

“This kingdom is an individual fact, if it is considered in regards to the obedience every loyal soul gives to Our Lord Jesus Christ. In fact, the kingdom of Christ is exercised over souls; and therefore the…

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(also known as St. Giuseppe Maria Pignatelli)

Born 27 December, 1737, in Saragossa, Spain; died 11 November, 1811.

Saint Joseph Pignatelli

His family was of Neapolitan descent and noble lineage. After finishing his early studies in the Jesuit College of Saragossa, he entered the Society of Jesus (8 May, 1753) notwithstanding his family’s opposition. On concluding his ecclesiastical studies he was ordained, and taught at Saragossa. In 1766 the Governor of Saragossa was held responsible for the threatened famine, and so enraged was the populace against him that they were about to destroy his palace by fire. Pignatelli’s persuasive power over the people averted the…

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A French nobleman’s finesse at the English court

November 17, 2014

While exiled in England, the Duke of Grammont attended a lunch of Charles II. The protocol of the time demanded that the officers serve the king on their knees. The king noticed the duke’s surprise and commented: ― “This is a sign of respect that no other king receives.” Since, from time immemorial, French and […]

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Accepting Suffering

November 17, 2014

Here we find the secret of the “Way of the Cross” society. With similar rectitude, medieval man logically embraced his own suffering, paying special attention to the hardest part of his situation. This is frequently represented in medieval pictures and stained glass where each is engaged in his craft. All work diligently but without hurry, […]

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November 18 – He Started the Cluniac Reform

November 17, 2014

St. Odo of Cluny Odo was born in 879 in Maine,and was the son of a pious and surprisingly learned layman, Abbo. Though vowed by his father to St. Martin in babyhood, he was given a military training and became a page at the court of Duke William. But the exercises of war and hunting […]

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November 19 – St. Nerses I, Bishop of Armenia, Martyr

November 17, 2014

Nerses I Armenian patriarch, surnamed “the Great”. Died 373. Born of the royal stock, he spent his youth in Caesarea where he married Sanducht, a Mamikonian princess. After the death of his wife, he was appointed chamberlain to King Arshak of Armenia. A few years later, having entered the ecclesiastical state, he was elected catholicos, […]

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November 19 – The Pope Who Resigned

November 17, 2014

Pope St. Pontian Dates of birth and death unknown. The “Liber Pontificalis” (ed. Duchesne, I, 145) gives Rome as his native city and calls his father Calpurnius. With him begins the brief chronicle of the Roman bishops of the third century, of which the author of the Liberian Catalogue of the popes made use in […]

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November 19 – Teacher, Engineer, Army Officer, Prisoner of War, Royal Tutor, and Priest

November 17, 2014

St. Raphael Kalinowski, O.C.D. (1835-1907) [Also known as Father Raphael of St. Joseph, O.C.D] Father Raphael of Saint Joseph Kalinowski, was born at Vilna, 1st September 1835, and at baptism received the name Joseph. Under the teaching of his father Andrew, at the Institute for Nobles at Vilna, he progressed so well that he received […]

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November 20 – Queen Elizabeth II Wedding Anniversary

November 17, 2014

 

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November 20 – St. Edmund the Martyr

November 17, 2014

St. Edmund the Martyr King of East Anglia, born about 840; died at Hoxne, Suffolk, November 20, 870. The earliest and most reliable accounts represent St. Edmund as descended from the preceding kings of East Anglia, though, according to later legends, he was born at Nuremberg (Germany), son to an otherwise unknown King Alcmund of […]

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November 20 – St. Ambrose of Camaldoli

November 17, 2014

St. Ambrose of Camaldoli An Italian theologian and writer, born at Portico, near Florence, 16 September, 1386; died 21 October, 1439. His name was Ambrose Traversari. He entered the Order of the Camaldoli when fourteen and became its General in 1431. He was a great theologian and writer, and knew Greek as well as he […]

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November 20 – Another strong and mighty angel

November 17, 2014

St. Felix of Valois Born in 1127; died at Cerfroi, 4 November, 1212. He is commemorated 20 November. He was surnamed Valois because, according to some, he was a member of the royal branch of Valois in France, according to others, because he was a native of the province of Valois. At an early age […]

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King and Queen at memorial for victims of downed flight MH17

November 13, 2014

According to The Telegraph: “Flags flew at half mast across the Netherlands for an emotional ceremony to pay tribute to MH17 victims attended by the country’s Royal couple King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxima. “The shooting down of MH17, and the deaths of 193 Dutch people, was the country’s worst single loss of life since […]

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The Holy Priest Montegazon

November 13, 2014

During the terrible Revolution that undermined the kingdom of France at the end of last century, a certain holy priest, named Montegazon, was driven from his home by the insurgents, and compelled to flee from village to village. But, faithful to his mission as a priest wherever he went, he gave the consolations of religion […]

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Medieval Uprightness

November 13, 2014

To be like Our Lord Jesus Christ was the ideal that inspired the Middle Ages. Medieval man desired to be linked to Him in the most complete way possible; to lose himself in Him. These sentiments were not only loving movements of admiration and awe. Medieval man took them to their final consequences, reasoning that […]

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November 14 – St. Lawrence O’Toole

November 13, 2014

St. Lawrence O’Toole (Lorcan ua Tuathail; also spelled Laurence O’Toole) Confessor, born about 1128, in the present County Kildare; died 14 November, 1180, at Eu in Normandy; canonized in 1225 by Honorius III. His father was chief of Hy Murray, and his mother one of the Clan O’Byrne. At the age of ten he was […]

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November 14 – Saint Erconwald

November 13, 2014

Saint Erconwald St. Erkenwald instructing monks. A historiated initial from the Chertsey Breviary. Bishop of London, died. about 690. He belonged to the princely family of the East Anglian Offa, and devoted a considerable portion of his patrimony to founding two monasteries, one for monks at Chertsey, and the other for nuns at Barking in […]

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November 15 – Martyred for God (and Money…)

November 13, 2014

Bl. Richard Whiting Last Abbot of Glastonbury and martyr, parentage and date of birth unknown, executed 15 Nov., 1539; was probably educated in the claustral school at Glastonbury, whence he proceeded to Cambridge, graduating as M.A. in 1483 and D.D. in 1505. If, as is probable, he was already a monk when he went to […]

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November 15 – Universal Doctor

November 13, 2014

St. Albert the Great Known as Albert the Great; scientist, philosopher, and theologian, born c. 1206; died at Cologne, 15 November 1280. He is called “the Great”, and “Doctor Universalis” (Universal Doctor), in recognition of his extraordinary genius and extensive knowledge, for he was proficient in every branch of learning cultivated in his day, and […]

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November 15 – Profoundly impressed by the religious atmosphere of his home

November 13, 2014

St. Desiderius of Cahors Bishop, born at Obrege (perhaps Antobroges, name of a Gaulish tribe), on the frontier of the Provincia Narbonnensis, of a noble Frankish family from Aquitaine, which possessed large estates in the territory of Albi; died 15 Nov., 655—though Krusch has called this date in question. In his childhood Desiderius was profoundly… […]

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November 16 – St. Agnes of Assisi

November 13, 2014

St. Agnes of Assisi Younger sister of St. Clare and Abbess of the Poor Ladies, born at Assisi, 1197, or 1198; died 1253. She was the younger daughter of Count Favorino Scifi. Her saintly mother, Blessed Hortulana, belonged to the noble family of the Fiumi, and her cousin Rufino was one of the celebrated “Three […]

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November 16 – St. Margaret of Scotland: In the Middle Ages, the Marvelous Was Something Achievable

November 13, 2014

Saint Margaret of Scotland Commentaries made by Prof. Plinio Correa de Oliveira … Sovereign and patroness of Scotland, 11th century. Although it is a very good intention to comment on the life of St. Margaret, at times one does not have the slightest biographical data on a saint. For lack of a better biography, I […]

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November 16 – St. Mechtilde

November 13, 2014

St. Mechtilde (MATILDA VON HACKEBORN-WIPPRA). Benedictine; born in 1240 or 1241 at the ancestral castle of Helfta, near Eisleben, Saxony; died in the monastery of Helfta, 19 November, 1298. She belonged to one of the noblest and most powerful Thuringian families… Read more here.

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November 16 – St. Gertrude the Great

November 13, 2014

St. Gertrude the Great Saint, Benedictine and mystic writer; born in Germany, January 6, 1256; died at Helfta, near Eisleben, Saxony, November 17, 1301 or 1302. In compliance with a petition from the King of Spain she was declared Patroness of the West Indies; in Peru her feast is celebrated with great pomp, and in […]

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November 17 – St. Hugh of Lincoln

November 13, 2014

St. Hugh of Lincoln Born about the year 1135 at the castle of Avalon, near Pontcharra, in Burgundy; died at London, 16 Nov., 1200. His father, William, Lord of Avalon, was sprung from one of the noblest of Burgundian houses; of his mother, Anna, very little is known. After his wife’s death, William retired from […]

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November 17 – Saint Gregory of Tours

November 13, 2014

Saint Gregory of Tours Born in 538 or 539 at Arverni, the modern Clermont-Ferrand; died at Tours, 17 Nov., in 593 or 594. He was descended from a distinguished Gallo-Roman family, and was closely related to the most illustrious houses of Gaul. He was originally called Georgius Florentius, but in memory of his maternal great-grandfather, […]

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November 17 – The Queen Gave Good Example Caring for the Sick and Suffering

November 13, 2014

St. Elizabeth of Hungary Also called St. Elizabeth of Thuringia, born in Hungary, probably at Pressburg, 1207; died at Marburg, Hesse, 17 November (not 19 November), 1231. She was a daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary (1205-35) and his wife Gertrude, a member of the family of the Counts of Andechs-Meran; Elizabeth’s brother succeeded […]

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Queen braves the threat from Islamist terrorists

November 10, 2014

According to The Telegraph: As police continued to question four men arrested last week over fears of an Islamist plot to attack Remembrance Sunday commemorations, the Queen, politicians and thousands of veterans refused to be distracted from remembering their dead. After a shot from a 13-pounder First World War gun rang out across Horse Guards Parade […]

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Princess Anne at Arlington’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

November 10, 2014

According to The Washington Post: “On her first official visit to the U.S. since 1994, Princess Anne also attended a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.” To read the entire article in The Washington Post, please click here

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Marshal de Villars: Commanding at 81 years of age

November 10, 2014

In 1734, Louis XV declared war on the House of Austria and the Marshal de Villars was chosen to command the combined armies of France, Spain, and Sardinia that were fighting in Italy. In clashes before Pizzigitone, when an officer cautioned that he was exposing himself to many dangers, the Marshal replied: — “You would […]

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Expressions of Tenderness

November 10, 2014

The signs of this tender love could be seen everywhere as medieval man sought to express the infinite perfections of Christ through tangible symbols. Indeed, love seeks nothing except to give itself and to communicate the riches it enjoys. Thus, Taylor observes, “And the same need of grasping the infinite and universal through symbols was […]

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November 11 – Patron of Veterans and Soldiers

November 10, 2014

St. Martin of Tours Bishop; born at Sabaria (today Steinamanger in German, or Szombathely in Hungarian), Pannonia (Hungary), about 316; died at Candes, Touraine, most probably in 397. In his early years, when his father, a military tribune, was transferred to Pavia in Italy, Martin accompanied him thither, and when he reached adolescence was, in […]

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November 12 – Saint Cunibert

November 10, 2014

Saint Cunibert (also Cunipert, or Kunibert) (c. 600 – 12 November c. 663) was the ninth Bishop of Cologne from 627 to his death. Contemporary sources only mention him between 627 and 643. Cunibert (also spelled ‘Honoberht’) was born somewhere along the Moselle to a family of the local Ripuarian Frankish aristocracy. He entered the church […]

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November 12 – Four years in Stalin’s concentration camp

November 10, 2014

Blessed Hryhorij Lakota Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church auxiliary bishop who suffered religious persecution and was martyred by the Soviet Government. Hryhorij Lakota was born 31 January 1893 in Holodivka, Lviv Oblast… Read more here.

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November 12 – Fearless and Bold

November 10, 2014

St. Lebwin (LEBUINUS or LIAFWIN). Apostle of the Frisians and patron of Deventer, b. in England of Anglo-Saxon parents at an unknown date; d. at Deventer, Holland, about 770. Educated in a monastery and fired by the example of St. Boniface, St. Willibrord, and other great English missionaries, Lebwin resolved to dovote his life to […]

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November 12 – Kidnapped, sold as a slave, ransomed by a bishop, and confidante of the emperor

November 10, 2014

St. Nilus (Neilos) Nilus the elder, of Sinai (died circa 430), was one of the many disciples and fervent defenders of St. John Chrysostom. We know him first as a layman, married, with two sons. At this time he was an officer at the Court of Constantinople, and is said to have been one of […]

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November 12 – Noble Ruthenian Stock

November 10, 2014

St. Josaphat Kuncevyc Martyr, born in the little town of Volodymyr in Lithuania (Volyn) in 1580 or — according to some writers — 1584; died at Vitebsk, Russia, 12 November, 1623. The saint’s birth occurred in a gloomy period for the Ruthenian Church. Even as early as the beginning of the sixteenth century the Florentine […]

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November 12 – How a Constable of France dies in battle

November 10, 2014

Anne de Montmorency had proven many times before that his race does not degenerate and the brave blood of an illustrious line of ancestors flowed in his veins. Imperious, severe, of a stern mood, he had undeniable bravery and strict fidelity to his duty. Although success had not always been… Read more here.

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November 13 – Patroness of missionaries

November 10, 2014

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, M.S.C. Also called Mother Cabrini, she founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, a religious institute which was a major support to the Italian immigrants to the United States. She was the first citizen of the United States to be canonized by the Catholic Church. She was born in Sant’Angelo […]

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November 13 – Grand Master of the Order of Christ

November 10, 2014

Prince Henry the Navigator Born 4 March, 1394; died 13 November, 1460; he was the fourth son of John I, King of Portugal, by Queen Philippa, a daughter of John of Gaunt. In 1415 he commanded the expedition which captured Ceuta, Portugal’s first oversea conquest, and there won his knightly spurs. Three years later he […]

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November 13 – Pure and noble, he received Holy Communion from the hands of angels

November 10, 2014

St. Stanislas Kostka Born at Rostkovo near Prasnysz, Poland, about 28 October, 1550; died at Rome during the night of 14-15 August, 1568. He entered the Society of Jesus at Rome, 28 October, 1567, and is said to have foretold his death a few days before it occurred. His father, John Kostka, was a senator […]

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November 13 – He calmed the fear of the end of the world

November 10, 2014

St. Abbon (or Abbo), born near Orléans c. 945; died at Fleury, 13 November, 1004, a monk of the Benedictine monastery of Fleury sur Loire (Fleuret), conspicuous both for learning and sanctity, and one of the great lights of the Church in the stormy times of Hugh Capet of France and of the three Ottos […]

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