Pope St. Agapetus I

(Also AGAPITUS.)

Reigned 535-536. Date of birth uncertain; died 22 April, 536. He was the son of Gordianus, a Roman priest who had been slain during the riots in the days of Pope Symmachus.

Pope st. Agapetus IHis first official act was to burn in the presence of the assembled clergy the anathema which Boniface II had pronounced against the latter’s rival Dioscurus and had ordered to be preserved in the Roman archives. He confirmed the decrees of the council held at Carthage…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Saint Alonso de Orozco Mena

Alphonsus de Orozco was born in Oropesa, Province of Toledo, Spain, on the 17th of October 1500, where his father was governor of the local castle. He began his studies in the nearby Talavera de la Reina and for three years he was a choir boy in the Cathedral of Toledo, where he made progress in the study of music. At the age of fourteen his parents sent him to the University of Salamanca, where an elder brother was already studying…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Bl. Thomas Johnson

newgate cell

Newgate cell

Carthusian martyr, died in Newgate gaol, London, 20 September, 1537. On 18 May, 1537, the twenty choir monks and eighteen brothers remaining in the London Charterhouse were required to take the Oath of Supremacy. Of these choir monks Thomas Johnson, Richard Bere, Thomas Green (priests), and John Davy (deacon) refused; and of the brothers Robert Salt, William Greenwood, Thomas Redyng, Thommas Scryven, Walter Pierson, and William Horne. On 29 May all were sent to Newgate, where they were chained standing and with their hands tied behind them to posts in the prison, and so left to die of starvation. However Margaret Clement, who as Margaret Giggs had been brought…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

September 21 – Pope Conon

September 19, 2016

Pope Conon

Date of birth unknown; died, after a long illness, 21 September, 687.

Pope_CononThe son, seemingly, of an officer in the Thracesian troop, he was educated in Sicily and ordained priest at Rome. His age, venerable appearance, and simple character caused the clergy and soldiery of Rome, who were in disagreement, to put aside their respective candidates and to elect him as pope. He was consecrated (21 October, 686) after notice of his election had been sent to the Exarch of Ravenna, or after it had been confirmed by him. He received the Irish missionaries, St. Kilian and his companions, consecrated Kilian bishop, and commissioned him and the others to preach the Faith in Franconia. (Vita S. Kiliani, in Canisius, Lect. Antiquæ, III, 175-180.) He was in favour with the savage Emperor Justinian II who informed him that he had recovered the Acts of the Sixth General Council, by which, he wrote, it was his intention to abide. Justinian also remitted certain taxes and dues owing to the imperial exchequer from several papal patrimonies.

Acta SS., 8 July, II, 612 sq.; DUCHESNE ed., Liber Pontificalis, I, 368 sq.; MANN, Lives of the Popes, I, pt. II, 72 sq.

Horace K. Mann (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Subscription9.2

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Gabriel Malagrida

A Jesuit missionary to Brazil, born 18 September or 6 December, 1689, at Menaggio, in Italy; died 21 September, 1761, at Lisbon. He entered the Jesuit order at Genoa in 1711. He set out from Lisbon in 1721 and arrived on the Island of Maranhào towards the end of the same year. Thence he proceeded to Brazil, where for twenty-eight years he underwent numerous hardships in the Christianization of the natives. In 1749 he was sent to Lisbon, where he was received with great honours by the aged King John V. In 1751 he returned to Brazil, but was recalled to Lisbon in 1753 upon the request of the queen dowager, Marianna of Austria, mother of Joseph, who had succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father, John V.

Gabriel_Malagrida

The great influence which he exerted at the Court of Lisbon was a thorn in the side of Pombal, the prime minister. By intrigues and calumnies he induced the young king, Joseph I, to banish Malagrida to Setubal (November, 1756) and to remove all the Jesuits from the Court. An attempt upon the life of the royal chamberlain, Teixeira, during which the king was accidentally wounded, was amplified by Pombal into a conspiracy headed by Malagrida and other Jesuits. Without proof, Malagrida was declared guilty of high treason, but, being a priest, he could not be executed without the consent of the Inquisition. Meanwhile the officials of the Inquisition, who were friendly towards Malagrida, were replaced by tools of Pombal, who condemned him as a heretic and visionary, whereupon he was strangled at an auto-da-fé, and his body burnt. The accusation of heresy is based on two visionary treatises which he is said to have written while in prison. His authorship of these treatises has never been proved, and they contain such ridiculous statements that, if he wrote them, he must previously have lost his reason in the horrors of his two and a half years’ imprisonment. That he was not guilty of any conspiracy against the king is admitted even by the enemies of the Jesuits. A monument in his honour was erected in 1887 in the parochial church of Menaggio.

The execution of Fr. Gabriel Malagrida.

The execution of Fr. Gabriel Malagrida.

Mury, Histoire de Gabriel Malagrida (Paris, 1884; 2nd ed., Strasburg, 1899; Ger. trans., Salzburg, 1890); Un monumento al P. Malagrida in La Civilità Cattolica, IX, series XIII (Rome, 1888), 30-43, 414-30, 658-79; Sommervogel, Bibliothèque de la Compagnie de Jésus, V (Brussels, 1894), 394-95; Butina, Vida de Malagrida (Barcelona, 1886).

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Subscription18

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

September 22 – Saint Emmeram

September 19, 2016

Saint Emmeram

Bishop of Poitiers and missionary to Bavaria, born at Poitiers in the first half of the seventh century; martyred at Ascheim (Bavaria) towards the end of the same century. Of a noble family of Aquitaine, he received a good education and was ordained priest. According to some authors Emmeram occupied the See of Poitiers, but this cannot be verified, for his name does not appear among the Bishops of Poitiers. He probably held the see for a short time, from the death of Dido (date unknown) to the episcopate of Ansoaldus (674)…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

St. Thomas of Villanova

Saint Thomas of Villanova

Educator, philanthropist, born at Fuentellana, Spain, 1488; died at Valencia, 8 September, 1555. Son of Aloazo Tomas Garcia and Lucia Martínez Castellanos, the saint was brought up in the practices of religion and charity. Every Friday his father was wont to give in alms all the meal he earned at the mill, besides his usual daily dole of bread. On great feast-days he added wood, wine, and money; while to poor farmers he loaned money and seed. On…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

What Popes, Saints, Doctors and Theologians Think Regarding the Lawfulness of War (contd.)

2. Popes and Councils Confirm the Doctrine of Saint Thomas on War

Saint Thomas Aquinas “sets forth the three conditions that legitimize in conscience the use of armed force.”

According to the entry “Paix et Guerre” in the Dictionnaire Apologétique de la Foi Catholique, Saint Thomas Aquinas “sets forth the three conditions that legitimize in conscience the use of armed force.”

1. When the war is brought on not by simple individuals or through some secondary authority,…but always through the authority that exercises the highest power in the State;

 

When the war is brought on not by simple individuals or through some secondary authority,…but always through the authority that exercises the highest power in the State

2. When the war is motivated by a just cause; that is to say, when the adversary is fought because of a proportionate offense that he really committed….

When the war is motivated by a just cause; that is to say, when the adversary is fought because of a proportionate offense that he really committed

3. When the war is conducted with a right intention; that is to say, in faithfully making every effort to promote good and to avoid evil in all ways possible….

When the war is conducted with a right intention; that is to say, in faithfully making every effort to promote good and to avoid evil in all ways possible

This doctrine of Saint Thomas is indirectly but strikingly confirmed in the papal Bulls, in the conciliar decrees of the Middle Ages concerning the “peace of God” and later the “truce of God,” just as in the peaceful and arbitrated settlement of conflicts between kingdoms. These documents, in their concordance, interpret the authentic thought of the Church and the general spirit of its teachings on the subject of moral questions concerning the right of peace and war…. The practice of popes and councils corroborates and accredits the teachings of the Doctors [on the subject], whose three fundamental principles Saint Thomas puts into relief. (cols. 1261-1262.)

 

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents XI, p. 514.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

According to Royal Central:

Queen Silvia and Princess Madeleine were happy to grant Enna her life’s dream of meeting them. Enna…is suffering from a disease that makes her life extra difficult. The little girl was clearly very thrilled… Madeleine said of the visit…“Enna is 7 and her dream was to meet the Royal Family at the Palace. My mom and I are so blessed to be able to fulfill that dream for her today!”

Earlier this year, Princess Madeleine held a princess themed tea party at the Royal Palace with children… On this occasion, the children were dressed as little princesses and princes.

To read the entire article on Royal Central, please click here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

According to Luxerazzi:

A new petition has called for a referendum on Luxembourg’s monarchy. The petition is supported by the political party Déi Lénk, which notes that the State of Luxembourg currently supports the Grand Ducal family at the expense of 10 million euros each year and asks for a nationwide vote on the type of government that will represent the people of Luxembourg. The petition is not yet available to the public but will be soon; petitions that receive 4500 signatures will receive a hearing in the Chambre des Députés.

More from Wort.

To read the entire article on Luxerazzi, please click here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Etiquette and American Nobility

September 15, 2016

Jerome sisters, Clara, Jennie and Leonie. Jennie Jerome, later became Lady Randolph Churchill, with her mother and sisters (b/w photo) by English Photographer, (19th century); black and white photograph; Private Collection; (add. info.: Jennie Jerome (1854-1921) Lady Randolph Churchill, American born society hostess and writer, shown on the right holding her dog; mother of Winston Churchill (1874-1965) British Prime Minister); English, out of copyright

Jerome sisters, Clara, Jennie and Leonie with their Mother. Jennie Jerome, later became Lady Randolph Churchill, mother of Winston Churchill.

On a certain occasion, some years since, half a dozen titled ladies were in the anteroom of the German Empress by appointment. Her Majesty was engaged for a time and the audience was delayed beyond the limits of ordinary patience.

At last one of the restless group remarked in French to her neighbor their prolonged wait was growing irksome, all the more so to her personally because it had been her good fortune to be born in America, where the routine of court etiquette is unknown.

lady clementina hawarden's daughters

To her surprise, the lady addressed replied that she also had been born in this country. In a few minutes others joined in the conversation, and it was discovered that the whole company, without exception, though members of that privileged class known in Europe as the nobility, were native Americans. It was a unique incident.  N. Y. Herald, 1887

Subscription10

Etiquette Enthusiast, Maura J. Graber, is the Site Moderator and Editor for Etiquipedia© Etiquette Encyclopedia

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 542

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

What Popes, Saints, Doctors and Theologians Think Regarding the Lawfulness of War

The pugnacious and warlike manifestation of the medieval spirit, as well as the militant character of the Church, may amaze the radicals of contemporary pacifism, absolutely intolerant of any and every type of war, for to their ears the expressions “holy war” and “just war” sound radically contradictory.

It will not be superfluous to place at their disposition various texts of Roman Pontiffs and leading Catholic thinkers, so that they may see that no such contradiction exists.

1. War’s Legitimate Purpose is Peace in Justice

According to the entry “Paix et Guerre” in the Dictionnaire Apologétique de la Foi Catholique, the teaching of Saint Augustine regarding peace and war can be condensed into four topics.

…the teaching of Saint Augustine regarding peace and war can be condensed into four topics.

First of all, there are wars that are just. These are the wars that attempt to repress a censurable enterprise on the part of an adversary.

But war should be considered an extreme remedy to which one resorts only after having ascertained the evident impossibility of otherwise safeguarding the legitimate right. Even if just, war in fact causes so many and such terrible sufferings—mala tam magna, tam horrenda, tam saeva—that one can only resign oneself to it through an imperious duty.

The legitimate goal of war is not precisely the victory, with all the satisfactions this entails. Rather, it is peace in justice, the durable reestablishment of a public order in which each thing would be restored to its rightful place….

The sufferings of war constitute one of the punishments for sin on this earth…

Finally, the sufferings of war constitute one of the punishments for sin on this earth. Even when defeat humiliates those who believed themselves in the right, this painful test must be seen as the design of God for punishing and purifying the people of faults for which they must admit their guilt. (Yves de la Brière [Paris: Gabriel Beauchesne Editeur, 1926], Vol. 3, col. 1260.

Nobility Book

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Nobility and Analogous Traditional Elites in the Allocutions of Pius XII: A Theme Illuminating American Social History (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Documents XI, p. 513.

Subscription5

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Pope Blessed Victor III

Born in 1026 or 1027 of a non-regnant branch of the Lombard dukes of Benevento; died in Rome, 16 Sept., 1087. Being an only son his desire to embrace the monastic state was strenuously opposed by both his parents. After his father’s death in battle with the Normans, 1047, he fled from the marriage which had been arranged for him and though brought back by force, eventually after a second flight to Cava obtained permission to enter the monastery of S. Sophia at Benevento…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

St. Cyprian of Carthage

(Thaschus Cæcilius Cyprianus).

St. CyprianBishop and martyr. Of the date of the saint’s birth and of his early life nothing is known. At the time of his conversion to Christianity he had, perhaps, passed middle life. He was famous as an orator and pleader, had considerable wealth, and held, no doubt, a great position in the metropolis of Africa. We learn from his deacon, St. Pontius, whose life of the saint is preserved, that his mien was dignified without severity, and cheerful without effusiveness. His gift of eloquence is evident in his writings…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

St. Robert Francis Romulus Bellarmine

(Also, “Bellarmino”).

A distinguished Jesuit theologian, writer, and cardinal, born at Montepulciano, 4 October, 1542; died 17 September, 1621.

His father was Vincenzo Bellarmino, his mother Cinthia Cervini, sister of Cardinal Marcello Cervini, afterwards Pope Marcellus II. He was brought up at the newly founded Jesuit college in his native town, and entered the Society of Jesus on 20 September, 1560, being admitted to his first vows on the following day. The next three years he spent in studying philosophy at the Roman College, after which he taught the humanities first at Florence, then at Mondovi. In 1567 he began his theology at Padua, but in 1569 was sent to finish it at Louvain, where he could obtain a fuller acquaintance with the prevailing heresies. Having been ordained there, he quickly obtained a reputation both as a professor and a preacher, in the latter capacity drawing to his pulpit both Catholics…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

The Stigmatization of Saint Francis, by Rubens

The Stigmatization of Saint Francis, by Rubens

Early in August, 1224, Francis retired with three companions to “that rugged rock ‘twixt Tiber and Arno”, as Dante called La Verna, there to keep a forty days fast in preparation for Michaelmas. During this retreat the sufferings of Christ became more than ever the burden of his meditations; into few souls, perhaps, had the full meaning of the Passion so deeply entered. It was on or about the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross (14 September) while praying on the mountainside, that he beheld the marvelous vision of the seraph, as a sequel of which there appeared on his body the visible marks of the five wounds of the Crucified which, says an early writer, had long since been impressed upon his heart. Brother Leo, who was with St. Francis when he received the stigmata, has left us in his note to the saint’s autograph blessing, preserved at Assisi, a clear and simple account of the miracle, which for the rest is better attested than many another historical fact.

Subscription16The saint’s right side is described as bearing on open wound which looked as if made by a lance, while through his hands and feet were black nails of flesh, the points of which were bent backward. After the reception of the stigmata, Francis suffered increasing pains throughout his frail body, already broken by continual mortification. For, condescending as the saint always was to the weaknesses of others, he was ever so unsparing towards himself that at the last he felt constrained to ask pardon of “Brother Ass”, as he called his body, for having treated it so harshly. Worn out, moreover, as Francis now was by eighteen years of unremitting toil, his strength gave way completely, and at times his eyesight so far failed him that he was almost wholly blind. During an access of anguish, Francis paid a last visit to St. Clare at St. Damian’s, and it was in a little hut of reeds, made for him in the garden there, that the saint composed that “Canticle of the Sun”, in which his poetic genius expands itself so gloriously. This was in September, 1225.

(from Life of St. Francis, Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

St. Hildegard

Born at Böckelheim on the Nahe, 1098; died on the Rupertsberg near Bingen, 1179; feast 17 September. The family name is unknown of this great seeress and prophetess, called the Sibyl of the Rhine. The early biographers give the first names of her parents as Hildebert and Mechtildis (or Mathilda), speak of their nobility and riches, but give no particulars of their lives. Later writers call the saint Hildegard of Böckelheim, of Rupertsberg, or of Bingen. Legends would make her a Countess of Spanheim. J. May (Katholik. XXXVII, 143) shows from letters and other documents that she probably belonged to the illustrious family of Stein, whose descendants are the present Princes of Salm. Her father was a soldier in the service of Meginhard, Count of Spanheim. Hildegard was a weak and sickly child, and in consequence received but little education at home. Her parents, though much engaged in worldly pursuits, had a religious disposition…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

(Correctly, PETER ARBUES).

The Martyrdom of Saint Pedro de Arbués by Antonio del Castillo y Saavedra.

The Martyrdom of Saint Pedro de Arbués by Antonio del Castillo y Saavedra.

Born in 1441 (or 1442); died 17 Sept., 1485. His father, a nobleman, was Antonio Arbues, and his mother’s name was Sancia Ruiz. He studied philosophy, probably at Huesca, but later went to Bologna, where in the Spanish college of St. Clement he was regarded as a model of learning and piety, and was graduated in theology and law. Returning to Spain he became a canon regular at Saragossa, where he made his religious profession in 1474. About that time Ferdinand and Isabella had obtained from Sixtus IV a Bull to establish in their kingdom a tribunal for searching out heretics, and especially Jews who after having received baptism had relapsed openly or secretly into Judaism; these were known as Marranos. The famous Thomas Torquemada, in 1483, was appointed grand inquisitor over Castile and, being acquainted with the learning and virtue of Peter Arbues, named him inquisitor provincial in the Kingdom of Aragon (1484). Peter performed the duties with zeal and justice. Although the enemies of the Inquisition accuse him of cruelty, it is certain that not a single sentence of death can be traced to him (see INQUISITION). The Marranos, however, whom he had punished hated and resolved to do away with him. One night while kneeling in prayer before the altar of Our Lady in the metropolitan church, where he used to recite the office with his brother canons, they attacked him, and hired assassins inflicted several wounds from which he died two days after. He was canonized by Pius IX, in 1867.

Subscription19

BOLLANDISTS, Proprium Festorum Hispanorum; LUZZI, Vita di S. Pietro de Arbues Canónico Regolare (Rome, 1867).

A. Allaria (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Phillippe-Charles-Jean-Baptiste-Tronson Du Coudray

Soldier, born at Reims, France, 8 September, 1738; died at Philadelphia, U.S.A., 11 September, 1777. He was educated for the army and showed great merit as an engineer. He was adjutant­ general of artillery and considered one of the best military experts in France when, in 1776, he volunteered to go to America to assist the colonists in their revolt against England. Silas Deane and Benjamin Franklin, the American agents, promised him a commission as major-general with command of the artillery. This stipulation gave great offence to the officers already attached to the army when he arrived from France, in May, 1777, with twenty-nine other officers and twelve sergeants of artillery. Several of the more prominent threatened to resign. As a compromise he was made inspector-general 11 August, 1777, with the rank of major-general, and assigned to command the works along the Delaware. On 11 Sept., 1777, he was drowned while crossing the Schuylkill River at Philadelphia, the horse on which he was seated becoming frightened and dragging him overboard.

His grave is here within the burial yard of Saint Mary's Catholic Church.

His grave is here within the burial yard of Saint Mary’s Catholic Church.

Congress gave him an official funeral and attended his requiem Mass, 18 Sept., 1777, in St. Mary’s church. This was one of the four occasions on which Congress was officially present at Mass during the Revolution, the others being the requiem on 8 May, 1780, for Don Juan de Miralles, the agent of the Spanish Government, and the Te Deums on 4 July, 1779, and 4 November, 1781, all being celebrated at St. Mary’s, Philadelphia. Du Coudray was buried in St. Mary’s churchyard, but the grave is now unknown.

GRIFFEN, Catholics and the American Revolution (Ridley Park, Pennsylvania, 1907); Cyclopedia of Am. Biog., s. v.; SHEA, Hist. of Cath. Ch. in U. S. (New York, 1889-92); HEITMAN, Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army (Washington, 1893).

THOMAS F. MEEHAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

Blessed Mary de Cervellione

(or De Cervello)

Popularly styled “de Socos” (of Help) Saint, born about 1230 at Barcelona; died there 19 September, 1290. She was a daughter of a Spanish nobleman named William de Cervellon. One day she heard a sermon preached by Blessed Bernard de Corbarie, the superior of the Brotherhood of Our Lady of Ransom at Barcelona, and was so deeply affected by his pleading for the Christian slaves and captives in the hands of the Turks that she resolved to do all in her power for their alleviation. In 1265 she joined a little community of pious women who lived near the monastery of the Mercedarians and spent their lives in prayer and good works under the direction of Blessed Bernard de Corbarie…

Read more here.

Print Friendly

{ 0 comments }

September 19 – The Pope asks Princess Mary to marry James II of England

September 15, 2016

Another voice, the most august of all, was now to break silence. The arguments of Kings, Cardinals, Ambassadors, and of her own family had failed to shake the purpose or convince the mind of the young Princess. Moved by a desire to benefit the Catholics of England, and as much perhaps by the solicitations of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Relative of Prince William and Prince Harry on path to sainthood

September 12, 2016

According to BBC News: The priest…was a great, great, great uncle of Diana, Princess of Wales. Born George Spencer in 1799, he was the youngest child of the second Earl Spencer, who was First Lord of the Admiralty at the time. He grew up at Althorp, where Diana Princess of Wales is now buried, and […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 13 – He had a mouth of gold

September 12, 2016

St. John Chrysostom (Chrysostomos, “golden-mouthed” so called on account of his eloquence). Doctor of the Church, born at Antioch, c. 347; died at Commana in Pontus, 14 September, 407. John — whose surname “Chrysostom” occurs for the first time in the “Constitution” of Pope Vigilius (cf. P.L., LX, 217) in the year 553 — is […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 14 – His gallant defeat saved Canada from the French Revolution

September 12, 2016

Marquis de Louis-Joseph Montcalm-Gozon A French general, born 28 Feb., 1712, at Candiac, of Louis-Daniel and Marie-Thérèse de Lauris; died at Quebec 14 Sept., 1759. He was descended from Gozon, Grand Master of Rhodes of legendary fame, The warlike spirit of his ancestors had given rise to the saying: “War is the tomb of the […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 14 – Formerly a sign of abject disgrace, it now adorns even crowns and crests

September 12, 2016

The Cross could not be decently mentioned amongst Romans, who looked upon it as an unlucky omen, and as Cicero says, not to be named by a freeman. The vision of the Cross appeared to Constantine in the sky on the eve of a battle, with the words, “In this sign thou shalt conquer,” a […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 15 – This Saint Felt the Pains of Purgatory

September 12, 2016

St. Catherine of Genoa also known as Caterina Fieschi Adorno.) Born at Genoa in 1447, died at the same place 15 September, 1510. The life of St. Catherine of Genoa may be more properly described as a state than as a life in the ordinary sense. When about twenty-six years old she became the subject […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 15 – Grandmother of Good King Wenceslaus

September 12, 2016

St. Ludmilla Wife of Boriwoi, the first Christian Duke of Bohemia, born at Mielnik, circa 860; died at Tetin, near Beraun, 15 September, 921. She and her husband were baptized, probably by St. Methodius, in 871. Pagan fanatics drove them from their country, but they were soon recalled, and after reigning… Read more here.

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

The Welcome Given by the People of Paris to the Count of Artois Upon His Return from Exile

September 12, 2016

The festive and enthusiastic reception given by the people of another European capital to another princely victim of misfortune—that given by the populace of Paris to the Count of Artois, the future Charles X, on his return from exile—shows well the people’s affection for the representatives of the ancient legitimate and paternal dynasties. It is […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Of a Hermit who fought to know whom he should have for his companion in Paradise, and of the leap made by King Richard of England.

September 8, 2016

One day Count Lucanor having called Patronio, said to him, “Patronio, I have great faith in your understanding, and believe that in any matter which you could not comprehend or give advice about no other man could succeed; I beg therefore that you will advise me as best you can on that which I am […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

First the standing army, then firearms scuttled the military spirit of the Crusades

September 8, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Well, then came the secularization of the fighting spirit through the hiring of regular armies in France. If I remember correctly, it was Louis XI that started it; but all the monarchs of the time started doing it as well. That did not exist before. The king would summon their […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 9 – Wife of a dissolute husband

September 8, 2016

Blessed Seraphina Sforza Born at Urbino about 1434; died at Pesaro, 8 September, 1478. Her parents were Guido Antonio of Montefeltro, Count of Urbino, and Cattarina Colonna. She was brought up at Rome by her maternal uncle, Martin V. In 1448 Seraphina married Alexander Sforza, Lord of Pesaro. Ten years afterwards her husband gave himself […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 9 – St. Omer

September 8, 2016

St. Omer Born of a distinguished family towards the close of the sixth or the beginning of the seventh century, at Guldendal, Switzerland; died c. 670. After the death of his mother, he, with his father, entered the monastery of Luxeuil in the Diocese of Besançon probably about 615. Under the direction of Saint Eustachius, […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 10 – Model of chastity

September 8, 2016

St. Nicholas of Tolentino Born at Sant’ Angelo, near Fermo, in the March of Ancona, about 1246; d. 10 September, 1306. He is depicted in the black habit of the Hermits of St. Augustine — a star above him or on his breast, a lily, or a crucifix garlanded with lilies, in his hand. Sometimes, […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 10 – They always carried a copy of his Bible in battle

September 8, 2016

St. Finnian of Moville Born about 495; died 589. Though not so celebrated as his namesake of Clonard, he was the founder of a famous school about the year 540. He studied under St. Colman of Dromore and St. Mochae of Noendrum (Mahee Island), and subsequently at Candida Casa (Whithern), whence he proceeded to Rome, […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 10 – St. Pulcheria, Empress, and her husband Marcian

September 8, 2016

St. Pulcheria Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire, eldest daughter of the Emperor Arcadius, born 19 Jan., 399; died in 453. After the death of Arcadius (408), her younger brother, Theodosius II, then only seven, became emperor under the guardianship of Anthimus. Pulcheria had matured early and had great administrative ability; she soon exerted salutary […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 10 – Arrested while preaching

September 8, 2016

St. Edward Ambrose Barlow (Alias RADCLIFFE and BRERETON.) Priest and martyr, born at Barlow Hall, 1585; died 10 September, 1641. He was the fourth son of Sir Alexander Barlow, Knight of Barlow Hall, near Manchester, by Mary, daughter of Sir Uryan Brereton, Knight of Handforth Hall, Co. Chester, and was baptized at Didsbury Church 30 […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

The Great Siege of Malta, May 18–September 11, 1565, was won because of one man: Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Valette

September 8, 2016

On the morning of August 18th the excessively heavy bombardment of Senglea warned them that an attack was imminent. It was not slow to develop. The moment that the rumble of the guns died down, the Iayalars and Janissaries were seen streaming forward across the no-man’s-land to the south. The attack developed in the same […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 11 – His fame will last forever as that of a gallant soldier and a true Christian

September 8, 2016

Louis-Christophe-Leon Juchault de la Moricière French general and commander-in-chief of the papal army, b. at Nantes, 5 February, 1806; d. at the château of Prouzel, near Amiens, 11 September, 1865. His father was descended from an old Breton family whose device was Spes mea Deus. His mother was Desirée de Robineau de Bougon. He made […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 11 – Prince Eugen of Savoy crushes the Turks at Zenta

September 8, 2016

Although his men had already done a forced march of over ten hours that day, Eugen gave the order to advance and then galloped ahead to see the scene at first hand. He spotted how, just above the bridge on the near side of the river, the water was shallow with a sandbank leading up […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 11 – Italian army invades the Papal State without a declaration of war

September 8, 2016

The King of Italy sends an ultimatum to Blessed Pope Pius IX As the French military situation deteriorated [in the Franco-Prussian War], the government in Florence grew bolder. Near the end of August [1870], the Italian cabinet issued a circular letter to all the governments of Europe, in which it declared that the time had […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 11 – Burned slowly to death at Nagasaki

September 8, 2016

Blessed Charles Spinola Born in Genoa in 1564, he was the son of the Count of Tassarolo, and the nephew of Cardinal Philip Spinola. He was educated in Spain and in the Jesuit school in Nola, Italy. He entered the noviatiate in 1584, and was ordained in 1594. In 1596, he received a letter appointing […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 12 – The Holy Name of the Virgin Mary; in thanksgiving for the victory over the Turks at Vienna

September 8, 2016

The Festival of the Holy Name of the Virgin Mary Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the universal Church as a solemn thanksgiving for the relief of Vienna, when it was besieged by the Turks in 1683. The Turks had formerly laid siege to Vienna, under Solyman the Magnificent, in 1529, in the reign […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Video – Redefeating the Turks: the Battle of Vienna, September 12, 1683

September 8, 2016

Before he set out, Sobieski had sent a letter to Innocent XI, in which he wrote: “When the good of the Church and Christianity is concerned I shed my blood to the last drop, together with the whole kingdom. Since my kingdom and I are two bulwarks of Christianity”. To commemorate Sobieski’s victory Pope Innocent […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 12 – Simon de Montfort Crushes the Albigensians at Muret

September 8, 2016

At the Battle of Muret on 12 September 1213 the Crusading army of Simon IV de Montfort defeated the Catharist, Aragonese and Catalan forces of Peter II of Aragon, at Muret near Toulouse. Simon IV de Montfort was the leader of the Albigensian Crusade to destroy the Cathar heresy and incidentally to join the Languedoc […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Henri Delassus

September 8, 2016

Msgr. Henri Delassus (1836-1921), ordained a priest in 1862, served in parishes in Valenciennes (Saint-Géry) and Lille (Sainte-Catherine and Sainte-Marie-Madeleine). He was names chaplain of the basilica Notre-Dame-de-la-Treille (Lille) in 1874, an honorary canon in 1882, and domestic prelate in 1904. In 1911 he was promoted to protonotary apostolic. In 1914 he became canon of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

A republic: inevitable?

September 5, 2016

According to The Crown Chronicles: The Governor-General of New Zealand, Lieutenant General Sir Jeremiah Mateparae, has declared that a republic in New Zealand is ‘inevitable’… Speaking on Māori Television’s Native Affairs programme on 16th August, the outgoing Governor-General said: “I guess it’s inevitable. All of these things are inevitable.” …I think his comments are a […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 6 – Blessed Thomas Tsuji

September 5, 2016

Born to the Japanese nobility in Sonogi on the island of Kyushu about the year 1571. Educated by Jesuits at Arima, he joined the Society of Jesus in 1587. He traveled all over Japan and became known for his eloquent, persuasive preaching. After the publication of an edict banning Catholic priests, he followed eighty of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 7 – The Outrage of Anagni

September 5, 2016

It had been the practice to speak of the spiritual and temporal powers in terms of pope and emperor, and it was long before it was realized, at least on the papal side, that the civil power, defeated as emperor, had returned to the attack with more aggressive vigour as the Monarchy and the State. […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 7: Richard the Lionheart defeats Saladin at Arsuf – Video

September 5, 2016

If video does not load, please click here.

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 7 – Grandson of Queen St. Clotilda

September 5, 2016

St. Cloud, Confessor A.D. 560. St. Cloud, called in Latin Chlodoardus, is the first and most illustrious saint among the princes of the royal family of the first race in France. He was son of Chlodomir, king of Orleans, the eldest son of St. Clotilda, and was born in 522. He was scarcely three years […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 8 – The Davidic ancestry of Mary

September 5, 2016

As we celebrate the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, let us recall her Davidic ancestry. St. Luke (2:4) says that St. Joseph went from Nazareth to Bethlehem to be enrolled, “because he was of the house and family of David”. As if to exclude all doubt concerning the Davidic descent of Mary, the Evangelist […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 8 – He added the Agnus Dei to the Mass

September 5, 2016

Pope St. Sergius I (Reigned 687-701), date of birth unknown; consecrated probably on 15 Dec., 687; died 8 Sept., 701. While Pope Conon lay dying, the archdeacon Pascal offered the exarch a large sum to bring about his election as his successor. Through the exarch’s influence the archdeacon was accordingly elected by a number of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Francis I’s Reception in Vienna After the Withdrawal of Napoleon’s Troops

September 5, 2016

The paternal character of the medieval monarchy was preserved in large measure by the sovereigns of the House of Austria until the dethronement of the Hapsburgs in 1918. The speech of Vienna’s burgomaster upon receiving the Emperor Francis I some time after the defeat at Wagram (1809) provides an expressive idea of the affection of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

Devotion of the Wanbanakki Indians to Monarchy

September 1, 2016

Our Indians were dirty; but though that caused him much suffering, it was not that which he saw most clearly. But this¹—sentiments so noble and so commonly prevalent, that the civilized world might well blush at the comparison: such simplicity of gratitude for small kindness; such tenderness of mothers; such heroism of filial piety. They […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

The acceptance of kings as grand masters of all Orders of Chivalry doomed them to disappearance

September 1, 2016

By Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Now, with that the very individuals engaged in the Orders of Chivalry failed to see what was being lost with the eclipse of the true crusading spirit, and the fact that society was going from one excess to another without sticking to a balanced, midway situation. And entire Orders of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 3 – All the principles of Catholicism can be found in his life

September 1, 2016

Pope St. Gregory I (“the Great”) Doctor of the Church; born at Rome about 540; died 12 March 604. Gregory is certainly one of the most notable figures in Ecclesiastical History. He has exercised in many respects a momentous influence on the doctrine, the organization, and the discipline of the Catholic Church. To him we […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 3 – St. Hereswitha

September 1, 2016

St. Hereswitha (HAERESVID, HERESWYDE). Daughter of Hereric and Beorhtswith and sister of St. Hilda of Whitby. She was the wife of Aethelhere, King of East Anglia, to whom she bore two sons, Aldwulf and Alfwold. By the “Liber Eliensis” she is stated to have been the wife of King Anna, the leder brother of King […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 4 – She predicted the speedy death of the emperor

September 1, 2016

St. Rose of Viterbo (also Rosalia, and in Sicily affectionately nicknamed La Santuzza) Virgin, born at Viterbo, 1235; died 6 March, 1252. The chronology of her life must always remain uncertain, as the Acts of her canonization, the chief historical sources, record no dates. Those given above are accepted by the best authorities. Born of […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 4 – Pope Saint Boniface I

September 1, 2016

Pope Saint Boniface I Elected 28 December, 418, he died at Rome, 4 September, 422. Little is known of his life antecedent to his election. The “Liber Pontificalis” calls him a Roman, and the son of the presbyter Jocundus. He is believed to have been ordained by Pope Damasus I (366-384) and to have served […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →

September 5 – Unashamed to beg alms even from his noble family

September 1, 2016

St. Laurence Justinian, Bishop and Confessor, First Patriarch of Venice Bishop and first Patriarch of Venice, born in 1381, and died 8 January, 1456. He was a descendant of the Giustiniani, a Venetian patrician family which numbered several saints among its members. Lawrence’s pious mother sowed the seeds of a devout religious life in the […]

Print Friendly
Read the full article →