According to The Telegraph:

Peter FitzSimons, the former Australian rugby player who is heading the push for the nation to become a republic, has said…

“…the tide of history will ultimately sweep my crowd forward. Similarly to gay marriage, it is compelled by an unanswerable logic. …the tide will go forward.”

Australians voted against changing to a republic in a referendum in 1999… Polls last year found support for a republic had plunged to the lowest levels in 20 years…

Mr FitzSimons…said the first step to becoming a republic should be a plebiscite to ask whether the public supported the switch.

To read the entire article in The Telegraph, please click here.

 

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According to the Crown Chronicles:

Buckingham Palace begins its Summer Opening once more…

This year’s exhibition…entitled ‘A Royal Welcome’…runs 25th July – 27th September 2015.

The Ballroom will be set up for a State Banquet, with the table dressed to impress. Silver-gilt centrepieces and candelabra from the magnificent Grand Service in the Royal Collection will feature, as well as 2,000 pieces of cutlery, and for 170 place settings.

The knighting stool and a knighting sword used to confer knighthoods will go on display, too; around 25 investitures take place each year, mostly at Buckingham Palace, by a senior member of the Royal Family.

To read the entire article in the Crown Chronicles, please click here.

The Telegraph has some spectacular pictures of this exhibit.

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According to the Guardian:

The empty space…has become a focal point across Spain after the newly elected leftist government in the city took down the bronze bust of former king Juan Carlos…

The bust was removed as part of a review of royalist symbols in Barcelona’s municipal buildings and across the city, said Gerardo Pisarello, Barcelona’s deputy mayor.

On Friday, Alberto Fernández Díaz, head of the conservative People’s party bloc at the city council, rushed to put up a portrait of King Felipe VI in the empty spot in Barcelona’s main chamber.

Minutes later, the portrait was quietly taken down by Pisarello.

To read the entire article in the Guardian, please click here.

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Painting of two Sisters of Charity by Armand Gautier.

Painting of two Sisters of Charity by Armand Gautier.

Archbishop Ryan, in the course of a sermon, related this incident: “During our Civil War in America two Sisters of Charity, walking together through the streets of Boston, were insulted by a wretched man through hatred of the religious garb they wore. Subsequently this man went into the army as a substitute for someone who had been drafted into it. He was wounded in one of the battles in Missouri, and brought to a temporary hospital in charge of Sisters, and, of course, was most kindly treated. When about to die, the Sister in attendance on him begged him to ask pardon of God for the sins of his life, and to prepare to meet his Judge.

Sister of Charity with Soldier“Sister,” replied the dying soldier, “I have been a bad man, but there is one act of my life that weighs more heavily upon me than all the others. I once insulted a member of the Order which has now treated me so kindly, and, sick as I am, were she only here now I would fall at her feet, beg her pardon, and die in peace.”

“She has already pardoned you,” replied the Sister; “the moment you were brought in here I recognized you by that mark on your forehead, and I long ago pardoned you from my heart.”

Sisters“And why,” rejoined the soldier, “have you been more kind to me than to the others?”

“It is because you insulted me so much, and for His sake,” she added, kissing her crucifix.

Nun and dying soldier“Send immediately for your priest,” said the dying man. “The religion that inspires such fortitude must be from God.”

And the priest and the Sister knelt together as the soldier peacefully died.

 

The Catechism In Examples Vol. V,  By the Rev. D. Chisholm Pg. 137-138

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 485

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Written by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

It is six o’clock in the evening. The toil of the day has come to an end.

The noble tranquility of the atmosphere envelops the vastitude of the fields, inviting one to repose and meditation. Nature is transfigured by a golden twilight, making everything glow with a remote and suave reflection of the inexpressible majesty of God. Faintly, in the distance, one hears the ringing of the Angelus. It is the crystalline and material voice of the Church, bidding one to pray. The two young peasants begin the prayer. Their physique manifests health and a long established habit of manual labor. While their dress is simple, in everything their bearing reveals purity, elevation, and the natural delicacy of profoundly Christian souls. Their modest social condition is, as it were, transformed and illuminated by their piety, which instills respect and sympathy. Their souls reflect the golden rays of the sun, but a sun much greater in every respect: the grace of God.

Angelus  by Jean-François Millet

Truly, their souls’ beauty is the center of the picture. The magnificent surroundings serve as a background for the beauty of these two souls united by the Son of God.

Nothing in these peasants gives the slightest suggestion of disquietude or uneasiness. They are entirely in consonance with their means, profession and class. What other dignity, what other fortune could this couple desire?

In this painting, Millet admirably brought together the necessary elements for one to comprehend the dignity of manual work in the placid and happy ambience of truly Christian virtue.

Not always is country life so. Millet captured, in a lucky stroke of his brush, the acme of moral and material beauty. His picture has the merit of teaching men to see, scattered about in the uneventfulness of rural, everyday existence, the genuine, frequent sparklings of this Christian physiognomy of souls in an environment enlivened by the Holy Church.

Millet’s state of mind, which he communicates to whomever contemplates his masterpiece, is turned toward God and the reflections of spiritual and material beauty which He impressed upon Creation.

To be exact, only some excess of sentimentalism could be regretted if one were to make a critique of the painting from the psychological standpoint.

Could the same praise be made of the painting by Yves Alix, “Le Maitre des Moissons,” also inspired by country life?

Yves Alix ”Le Maitre des MoissonsThe author failed to perceive, feel or accept in his view of agricultural work anything that makes it worthy of being carried out by a son of God.

In this painting it is not the spirit dominating matter and ennobling it, but rather the matter penetrating the spirit and debasing it.

Manual labor has impressed upon the people a certain brutality and, as it were, wickedness. Their countenances display a state of mind which reminds one of a concentration camp. If those in the background did not seem so hardened, if they were able to cry, their tears would be of hate; their moans, were they able to moan, would be like the grating of gears. The sadness, the evil, the cacophony of the colors, shapes and souls are manifested by the manner in which the main character shouts.

One does not know whether he is making a threat or uttering a blasphemy.

Yves Alix gathered, exaggerated and distorted to the point of delirium the aspects whereby work is expiation and suffering, and the earth a place of exile; he expressed with meticulous and, so to say, enthusiastic fidelity that in the human soul which is most heinous and low, presenting the ensemble as an actual and normal aspect of the spiritual, professional and everyday life of the worker.

Millet’s work of art calls to mind a prayer, while the nightmare of Yves Alix belches forth a puff of revolution.

If God were to permit the angels to beautify the earth and life, they would go about it by making those aspects that Millet sought to observe and assemble, more abundant, more beautiful and longer lasting. If He were to allow the demons of hell to disfigure men and Creation, they would do so by forming in men’s souls, bodies, and in the appearance of things, characters and environments such as those found in the painting of Yves Alix.

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St. Ignatius Loyola

St. Ignatius of LoyolaYoungest son of Don Beltrán Yañez de Oñez y Loyola and Marina Saenz de Lieona y Balda.

Born in 1491 at the castle of Loyola above Azpeitia in Guipuscoa; died at Rome, 31 July, 1556.

The saint was baptized Iñigo, after St. Enecus (Innicus), Abbot of Oña: the name Ignatius was assumed in later years, while he was residing in Rome…

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July 31 – St. Germain

July 30, 2015

St. Germain

Statue of St. Germain at Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois Church in Paris.Bishop of Auxerre, born at Auxerre c. 380; died at Ravenna, 31 July, 448. He was the son of Rusticus and Germanilla, and his family was one of the noblest in Gaul in the latter portion of the fourth century. He received the very best education provided by the distinguished schools of Arles and Lyons, and then went to Rome, where he studied eloquence and civil law. He practised there before the tribunal of the prefect for some years with great success. His high birth and brilliant talents brought him into contact with the court, and he married Eustachia, a lady…

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St. Helen of Sköfde

Martyr in the first half of the twelfth century. Her feast is celebrated 31 July.

Her life (Acta SS., July, VII, 340) is ascribed to St. Brynolph, Bishop of Skara, in Sweden (d. 1317). She was of noble family and is generally believed to have been the daughter of the Jarl Guthorm. When her husband died she remained a widow and spent her life in works of charity and piety; the gates of her home were ever open to the needy and the church of Sköfde was almost entirely built at her expense. Her daughter’s husband was a very cruel man, and was in…

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St. Alphonsus Liguori

Born at Marianella, near Naples, 27 September, 1696; died at Nocera de’ Pagani, 1 August, 1787.

The eighteenth century was not an age remarkable for depth of spiritual life, yet it produced three of the greatest missionaries of the Church, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, St. Paul of the Cross, and St. Alphonsus Liguori.

St. Alphonsus LiguoriAlphonsus Mary Antony John Cosmas Damian Michael Gaspard de’ Liguori was born in his father’s country house at Marianella near Naples, on Tuesday, 27 September, 1696. He was baptized…

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Saint Eusebius, Bishop of Vercelli, born in Sardinia circa 283; died at Vercelli, Piedmont, August 1, 371.

St. Eusebius of VercelliHe was made lector in Rome, where he lived some time, probably as a member, or head, of a religious community (Spreitzenhofer, Die Entwickelung des alten Monchtums in Italien, Vienna, 1894, 14 sq.). Later he came to Vercellae, the present Vercelli, and in 340 was unanimously elected bishop of that city by the clergy and the people. He received episcopal consecration at the hands of Pope Julius I on December 15 of the same year.

According to the testimony of St. Ambrose…

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Pope Severinus

Pope SeverinusThe date of his birth is not known. He was consecrated seemingly on 28 May, 640, and died 2 Aug., 640. Severinus, a Roman and the son of Abienus, was elected as usual on the third day after the death of his predecessor, and envoys were at once sent to Constantinople, to obtain the confirmation of his election (Oct., 638). But the emperor, instead of granting the confirmation, ordered Severinus to sign his Ecthesis, a Monothelite profession of faith. This the pope-elect refused to do, and the Exarch Isaac, in order to force him to compliance, plundered the Lateran Palace. All was in vain; Severinus stood firm. Meanwhile his envoys at Constantinople, though refusing to sign any heretical documents and deprecating violence in matters of faith, behaved with great tact, and finally secured the imperial confirmation. Hence, after a vacancy of over a year and seven months, the See of Peter was again filled, and its new occupant proceeded at once to declare that as in Christ there were two natures so also were there in Him two wills and two natural operations. During his brief reign he built the apse of old St. Peter’s in which church he was buried.

Liber Pontificalis, ed. DUCHESNE, I (Paris, 1886), 328 sq.; the works of St. MAXIMUS, in P.G., XC, XCI; MANN, Lives of the Popes in the Early Middle Ages, I (London, 1906), 346 sqq.

Horace K. Mann (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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St. Nicodemus

A prominent Jew of the time of Christ, mentioned only in the Fourth Gospel. The name is of Greek origin, but at that epoch such names were occasionally borrowed by the Jews, and according to Josephus (Ant. of the Jews, XIV, iii, 2) Nicodemus was the name of one of the ambassadors sent by Aristobulus to Pompey. A Hebrew form of the name (Naqdimon) is found in the Talmud. Nicodemus was a Pharisee, and in his capacity of sanhedrist, (John, vii, 50) was a leader of…

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On August 3, 1941, Bishop Clemens August Graf von Galen informed his listeners in a third sermon about the continued desecration of Catholic churches, the closing of convents and monasteries, and the deportation and murder of mentally ill people (who were sent to undisclosed destinations), while a notice was sent to family members stating that the person in question had died. This is murder, he exclaimed, unlawful by divine and German law, a rejection of…

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July 28 – St. Samson

July 27, 2015

St. Samson

Subscription7Bishop and confessor, born in South Wales; died 28 July, 565 (?). The date of his birth is unknown.

His parents whose names are given as Amon of Dyfed and Anna of Gwynedd, were of noble, but not royal, birth. While still an infant he was dedicated to God and entrusted to the care of St. Illtyd, by whom he was brought up in the monastery of Llantwit Major. He showed exceptional talents in his studies, and was eventually ordained deacon and priest by St. Dubric. After this he retired to another monastery, possibly after that on Caldy Island, to practise greater austerities, and some years later became it abbot. About this time some Irish monks who…

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Pope Victor II

(GEBHARD, COUNT OF CALW, TOLLENSTEIN, AND HIRSCHBERG.)

Pope Victor IIBorn about 1018; died at Arezzo, 28 July, 1057. The papal catalogues make him a native of the Bavarian Nordgau, while most German sources designate Swabia as his birthplace. His parents were Count Hartwig and Countess Baliza; the Emperor Henry III recognized him as a collateral kinsman, and he was a nephew of Bishop Gebhard III of Ratisbon, who at the court Diet of Goslar presented him (Christmas Day, 1042) to Henry III as a candidate for the episcopal see of Eichstätt. The emperor hesitated at first because Gebhard was only twenty-four years old, but, on the advice of the aged Archbishop Bardo of Mainz, he finally consented to invest him with this important see. Gebhard proved to be a good bishop and a prudent statesman. He was in the emperor’s retinue when the latter was crowned at Rome in 1046; he took part in the synod presided over by Leo IX at Mainz in October, 1049, and in the consultations between the pope and the emperor at Ratisbon and Bamberg in 1052. By this time he had become the most influential councillor of Henry III. It was upon his advice that in 1053 a German army, which was on its way to join Leo IX in his war against the Normans, was recalled, an advice which he is said to have regretted when he was pope (Leo Marsicanus in his “Chronaicon Casinense”, II, 89, in P.L., CLXXIII, 692). Early in the same year he became regent of Bavaria for the three-year old Henry IV. In this capacity he had occasion to prove his loyalty towards the emperor by defind the rights of the empire against the deposed Duke Conrad, the counts of Scheyern, and his own uncle, Bishop Gebhard of Ratisbon.

Pope Victor IIAfter the death of Leo IX (19 April, 1054) Cardinal-subdeacon Hildebrand came to the emperor at the head of a Roman legation with the urgent request to designate Gebhard as pope. At the Diet of Mainz, in September, 1054, the emperor granted this request, but Gebhard refused to accept the papal dignity. At a court Diet held at Ratisbon in March, 1055, he finally accepted the papacy, but only on condition that the emperor restored to the Apostolic See all the possessions that had been taken from it. The emperor consented to this condition and Gebhard accompanied Hildebrand to Rome, where he was formally elected and solemnly enthroned on Maundy Thursday, 13 April, 1055, taking the name of Victor II. Even as pope he retained the Diocese of Eichstätt. Victor II was a worthy successor of Leo IX. With untiring zeal he combated, like his predecessor, against simony and clerical concubinage. Being well supported by the emperor, he often succeeded where Leo IX had failed. On Pentecost Sunday, 4 June, 1055, he held a large synod at Florence, in presence of the emperor and 120 bishops, where former decrees against simony and incontinence were confirmed and several offending bishops deposed. To King Ferdinand of Spain he sent messengers with threats of excommunication if he should continue in his refusal to acknowledge Henry III as Roman Emperor. Ferdinand submitted to the papal demands. Before the emperor returned to Germany he transferred to the pope the duchies of Spoleto and Camerino. Early in 1056 Victor II sent Hildebrand back to France to resume his labours against simony and concubinage, which he had begun under Leo IX. He appointed the archbishops Raimbaud of Arles and Pontius of Aix papal legates to battle against the same vices in Southern France. Late in the summer of the same year he accepted the urgent invitation of the emperor to come to Germany, arriving at Goslar on 8 September. He accompanied Henry III to Botfeld in the Hartz Mountains where on 5 October he witnessed the untimely death of the emperor. Before his death, the emperor entrusted his six-year-old successor, Henry IV, and the regency of the kingdom to the pope. On 28 October, after burying the emperor in the cathedral at Speyer, he secured the imperial succession of Henry IV by having him solemnly enthroned at Aachen. He still further strengthened the position of the boy-king by recommending him to the loyalty of the princes at the imperial Diet which he convened at Cologne early in December, and at the court Diet of Ratisbon on Christmas Day.

Subscription3Leaving the regency of Germany in the hands of Agnes mother of Henry IV, Victor returned to Rome in February, 1057, where he presided over a council at the Lateran on 18 April. On 14 June he created Frederick, whom he had a month previously helped to the abbacy of Monte Cassino, Cardinal-priest of San Crisogono thus gaining the friendship of the powerful Duke Godfrey of Lorraine, a brother of the new cardinal. He then went to Tuscany, where he settled (23 July) a jurisdictional dispute between the Bishops of Arezzo and Siena at a synod held in the palace of St. Donatus near Arezzo; five days later he died. His attendants wished to bring his remains to the cathedral at Eichstätt for burial. On their way thither, the remains were forcibly taken from them by some citizens fo Ravena and buried there in the Church of Santa Maria Rotonda, the burial place of Theodoric the Great.

The chief sources for the life of Victor II are the narrations of an anonymous writer of Herrieden, ANONYMUS HASERENSIS, a contemporary of Henry IV; they are printed in Mon. Germ. Hist.: Script., VII, 263 sq.; MANN, The Lives of the Popes in the Middle Ages, VI (London, 1910), 183-206; JORIS, Victor II, pape et regent de l’empire in Revue du monde catholique (1862-3), IV 560-72; V, 46-61; HÖFLER, Die deutsch. Papste, II (Ratisbon, 1839), 217-68; STEINDORFF in Allgemeine deutsch. Biographie, XXXIX (Leipzig, 1895), 670-3; IDEM, Jahrbucher des deutsch. Reiches unter Heinrich III’, I, II (Leipzig, 1874-81); MEYER VON KNONAU, Jahrb. des deutsch. Reiches unter Heinrich IV. u. Heinrich V, I (Leipzig, 1890); LEFFLAD, Regesten der Bischofe von Eichstädt, I (Eichstadt, 1871); SAX, Die Bischofe u. Reichsfursten von Eichstädt, I (Landshut, 1884), 39, 43; WILL, Victor II als Papst und Reichverweser in Tubinger Theol. Quartalschrift (1862), 185-243; JAFFE, Regesta Pontif. Rom. (Leipzig, 1885-8), I, 549-553; II, 710-1, 750; WATTERICH, Pontif. rom. vitae, I (Leipzig, 1862), 177-88; Liber pontif., ed. DUCHESNE, II, 277.

MICHAEL OTT (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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THE BATTLES OF LA NAVAL DE MANILA

Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary Saves the Philippines from the Invading Dutch Fleet

Inside the Dominican church of Santo Domingo in Quezon City sits in celestial splendor and glory one of the most venerated and beloved image of the Most Holy Virgin in the Philippines. Among an impressive array of twenty-eight canonically crowned statues of  the Mother of God in this Catholic nation in the Far East, Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval de Manila, also known as La Gran Señora de Filipinas and Nuestra Señora del Santisimo Rosario, stand…

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St. Olaf Haraldson

Martyr and King of Norway (1015-30), born 995; died 29 July, 1030.

He was a son of King Harald Grenske of Norway. According to Snorre, he was baptized in 998 in Norway, but more probably about 1010 in Rouen, France, by Archbishop Robert. In his early youth he went as a viking to England, where he partook in many battles and became earnestly interested in Christianity. After many difficulties he was elected King of Norway, and made it his object to extirpate heathenism and make the Christian religion the basis of his kingdom. He is the…

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Pope Blessed Urban II

(Otho, Otto or Odo of Lagery), 1088-1099, born of a knightly family, at Châtillon-sur-Marne in the province of Champagne, about 1042; died 29 July, 1099. Under St. Bruno (afterwards founder of the Carthusians) Otho studied at Reims, where he later became canon and archdeacon. About 1070 he retired to Cluny and was professed there under the great abbot St. Hugh. After holding the office of prior he was sent by St. Hugh to Rome as one of the monks asked for by Gregory VII, and he was of great assistance to Gregory in the difficult task of reforming the…

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St. Theobald

St. Theobald of ProvinsBorn at Provins in the Province of Champagne, France, in 1017; died at Salanigo in Italy 30 June, 1066. He was a member of a noble family. In 1054 without the knowledge of his parents he and his friend Walter gave themselves to the life of hermits at Sussy in the Ardennes, then at Pittingen (now Pettingen) in the Diocese of Trier, a district that today belongs to the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. From this place the two made a pilgrimage to Compostella in Spain, and afterward…

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According to the Crown Cronicles:

The Royal Mint is releasing a coin to celebrate Prince George of Cambridge’s second birthday.

A special 925 sterling silver £5 coin…bears a contemporary St. George and the Dragon image…

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge…approved the design, which is restricted to a limited mintage of just 7,500 coins.

George’s birth was marked with the release of a limited edition penny, for any other child born on the same day as him, and a further 10,000 special silver coins were minted to mark the occasion for the public to buy; they sold out within days.

To read the entire article on the Crown Chronicles, please click here.

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King Filip of Belgium Calls for True Relationships

July 23, 2015

According to Flanders News, King Filip said: “We have a need for true, profound relationships instead of short, superficial, virtual relationships. Only in such relationships can personality and critical spirit develop and can we give the best of ourselves, can everybody’s talents develop fully and does everybody get an opportunity to find their own place […]

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Swan Upping on the River Thames, in pictures

July 23, 2015

According to The Telegraph: Swan Upping, the annual census of the swan population on the River Thames, commenced today in Sunbury, Surrey. The ceremony of Swan Upping dates from the twelfth century and takes place during the third week of July every year. By tradition scarlet uniforms are worn by the Queen’s Swan Marker and […]

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What One Lie Can Do

July 23, 2015

In the days when the first Catholic missionaries went to Japan to preach the Gospel to the natives, certain merchants from Holland went to the Emperor and told him that the only aim that these missionaries had was to bring the Portuguese and the Spaniards into the country, that in time they might take possession […]

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Non in commotione Dominus

July 23, 2015

“God is not found in agitation”  (3 Kings 19:11) by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira It is night. Imagine the complete stillness that inhabits the darkness captured by this photograph. The soul feels invited to reflection in such an atmosphere. The circumstances of daily life – great or small, pleasant, tiresome, or even painful – all […]

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July 24 – Chaste Queen

July 23, 2015

Saint Kinga of Poland (also known as Cunegunda, Kunigunda, Kunegunda, Cunegundes, Kioga, Zinga; Polish: Święta Kinga, Hungarian: Szent Kinga) Poor Clare and patroness of Poland and Lithuania; born in 1224; died 24 July, 1292, at Sandeck, Poland. She was the daughter of King Bela IV and niece of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, and from her […]

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July 24 – She Was Fearless, Courageous, and Unswerving

July 23, 2015

Matilda of Canossa Countess of Tuscany, daughter and heiress of the Marquess Boniface of Tuscany, and Beatrice, daughter of Frederick of Lorraine, b. 1046; d. 24 July, 1114. In 1053 her father was murdered. Duke Gottfried of Lorraine, an opponent of the Emperor Henry III, went to Italy and married the widowed Beatrice. But, in […]

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July 24 – St. John Boste

July 23, 2015

St.  John Boste (Or JOHN BOAST.) Priest and martyr, born of good Catholic family at Dufton, in Westmoreland, about 1544; died at Durham, 24 July, 1594. He studied at Queen’s College, Oxford, 1569-72, became a Fellow, and was received into the Church at Brome, in Suffolk, in 1576. Resigning his Fellowship in 1580, he went […]

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July 25 – St. Apollinaris

July 23, 2015

St. Apollinaris The most illustrious of the Bishops of Valence, b. at Vienne, 453; d. 520. He lived in the time of the irruption of the barbarians, and unhappily Valence, which was the central see of the recently founded Kingdom of Burgundy, had been scandalized by the dissolute Bishop Maximus, and the see in consequence […]

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July 26 – In memoriam: Princess Tatiana Von Metternich – who called Hitler a “stuffed doll”

July 23, 2015

According to The Telegraph: Princess Tatiana Von Metternich, who died…on July 26, 2006, aged 91, was…one of the most beautiful women of her day… …she witnessed the effect of Nazism on Germany, was close to those involved in the unsuccessful plot to kill Hitler in 1944, and was forced to make a 600-kilometre trek across […]

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July 26 – Blessed John Ingram

July 23, 2015

Blessed John Ingram English martyr, born at Stoke Edith, Herefordshire, in 1565; executed at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 26 July, 1594. He was probably the son of Anthony Ingram of Wolford, Warwickshire, by Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Hungerford. He was educated first in Worcestershire, then at the English College, Reims, at the Jesuit College, Pont-a-Mousson, and at […]

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July 27 – Wanted: Noble Men for the Missions, Never to Return Home

July 23, 2015

Martyrs of Cuncolim On Monday, 25 July, 1583, the village of Cuncolim in the district of Salcete, territory of Goa, India, was the scene of the martyrdom of five religious of the Society of Jesus: Fathers Rudolph Acquaviva, Alphonsus Pacheco, Peter Berno, and Anthony Francis, also Francis Aranha, lay brother. Rudolph Acquaviva was born 2 […]

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July 27 – St. Pantaleon

July 23, 2015

St. Pantaleon Martyr, died about 305. According to legend he was the son of a rich pagan, Eustorgius of Nicomedia, and had been instructed in Christianity by his Christian mother, Eubula. Afterwards he became estranged from Christianity. He studied medicine and became physician to the Emperor Maximianus. He was won back to Christianity by the […]

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July 21 – Fearless in every sense

July 20, 2015

St. Lorenzo da Brindisi (Also: Lawrence, or Laurence, of Brindisi.) Born at Brindisi in 1559; died at Lisbon on 22 July, 1619. In baptism he received the names of Julius Caesar. Guglielmo de Rossi — or Guglielmo Russi, according to a contemporary writer — was his father’s name; his mother was Elisabetta Masella. Both were […]

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July 21 – He raised the king’s son back to life, but wished to be buried among the criminals

July 20, 2015

St. Arbogast (Gaelic Arascach). St. Arbogast has been claimed as a native of Scotland, but this is owing to a misunderstanding of the name “Scotia”, which until late in the Middle Ages really meant Ireland. He flourished about the middle of the seventh century. Leaving Ireland, as so many other missionaries had done, he settled […]

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July 22 – The Siege of Belgrade (1456)

July 20, 2015

The Siege of Belgrade (or Battle of Belgrade, or Siege of Nándorfehérvár) occurred from July 4 to July 22, 1456. After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. His immediate objective was the border fort of the town of […]

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5th Centennial of the birth of the “Second Apostle of Rome”

July 20, 2015

St. Philip Neri Born at Florence, Italy, 22 July, 1515; died 27 May, 1595. Philip’s family originally came from Castelfranco but had lived for many generations in Florence, where not a few of its members had practised the learned professions, and therefore took rank with the Tuscan nobility. Among these was Philip’s own father, Francesco […]

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July 22 – With his lady’s permission, this lord left court to become a monk, then abbot

July 20, 2015

St. Wandrille [Abbot of Fontenelles, in Normandy.]  He was nearly related to Pepin of Landen and Erchinoald, the two first lords in the kingdom of Austrasia; and in his youth was made count of the palace under Dagobert I. He was humble on the highest pinnacle of honors, and mortified amidst pleasures. To retrieve… Read […]

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July 23 – The most celebrated saint of the Northern kingdom

July 20, 2015

St. Bridget of Sweden The most celebrated saint of the Northern kingdoms, born about 1303; died 23 July, 1373. She was the daughter of Birger Persson, governor and provincial judge (Lagman) of Uppland, and of Ingeborg Bengtsdotter. Her father was one of the wealthiest landholders of the country, and, like her mother, distinguished by deep […]

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Ferdinand, King of Naples

July 16, 2015

Some time ago King Ferdinand was going from Rome to Naples; his son was with him. They were traveling in disguise, so that no one knew them, and were in great haste, being on business of great importance. On the way an accident happened to one of the wheels of the carriage, which caused them […]

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Fatima and the Necessity of Suffering

July 16, 2015

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira Two of the three Fatima seers, Jacinta and Francisco, died young because of the need for victim souls to give necessary fecundity to Our Lady’s plan. Their lives were proof that nothing great is done without suffering. Indeed, suffering helps those souls who are absorbed with themselves and unwilling to […]

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July 17 – When the Saracens attacked Rome…

July 16, 2015

Pope St. Leo IV (Reigned 847-55) A Roman and the son of Radoald, was unanimously elected to succeed Sergius II, and as the alarming attack of the Saracens on Rome in 846 caused the people to fear for the safety of the city, he was consecrated (10 April, 847) without the consent of the emperor. […]

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July 17 – Martyred in the Name of Equality

July 16, 2015

The Sixteen Blessed Teresian Martyrs of Compiègne Guillotined at the Place du Trône Renversé (now called Place de la Nation), Paris, 17 July, 1794. They are the first sufferers under the French Revolution on whom the Holy See has passed judgment, and were solemnly beatified 27 May, 1906. Before their execution they knelt and chanted […]

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July 17 – The day the Tsar was murdered

July 16, 2015

Execution of Tsar Nicholas II and his family In the early hours of 17 July 1918, the royal family was awakened around 2:00 am, told to dress, and led down into a half-basement room at the back of the Ipatiev house. The pretext for this move was the family’s safety — that anti-Bolshevik forces were […]

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July 18 – A soldier of hell who became a soldier of heaven

July 16, 2015

Godfrey of Bouillon Duke of Lower Lorraine and first King of Jerusalem, son of Eustache II, Count of Boulogne, and of Ida, daughter of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine; born probably at Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1060; died at Jerusalem, 18 July, 1100 (according to a thirteenth-century chronicler, he was born at Baisy, in Brabant; see […]

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July 18 – “Don’t drink water, drink beer” said the bishop

July 16, 2015

Saint Arnulf of Metz Statesman, bishop under the Merovingians, born c. 580; died c. 640. His parents belonged to a distinguished Frankish family, and lived in Austrasia, the eastern section of the kingdom founded by Clovis. In the school in which he was placed during his boyhood he excelled through his talent and his good […]

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July 18 – She Married a Man to Change Him and It Worked

July 16, 2015

Saint Hedwig, Queen of Poland Born, 1371. Died, 17 July 1399 during child birth. Hedwig was the youngest daughter of King Louis I of Hungary. Because she was great-niece to King Casimir III of Poland, she became Queen of Poland in 1382 upon her father‘s death. She was engaged to William, Duke of Austria, whom […]

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July 19 – The knight who was afraid of water, but not afraid of martyrdom

July 16, 2015

Blessed Hroznata of Bohemia Founder of the Monasteries of Teplá and Chotěšov, born (c) 1170, died July 14, 1217. In the happy reign of Premysl, – also called Ottacar, – king of Bohemia, among the other magnates of the kingdom the first place at court, next to the king’s magnificence, was held by Hroznata, the […]

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July 19 – Her whole family became saints

July 16, 2015

St. Macrina the Younger Born about 330; died 379. She was the eldest child of Basil the Elder and Emmelia, the granddaughter of St. Macrina the Elder, and the sister of the Cappadocian Fathers, Sts. Basil and Gregory of Nyssa. The last-mentioned has left us a biography of his sister in the form of a […]

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July 19 – Penitent Nobility

July 16, 2015

St. Arsenius Anchorite; born 354, at Rome; died 450, at Troe, in Egypt. Theodosius the Great having requested the Emperor Gratian and Pope Damasus to find him in the West a tutor for his son Arcadius, they made choice of Arsenius, a man well read in Greek literature, member of a noble Roman family, and […]

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July 20 – Carolingian Reformer

July 16, 2015

St. Ansegisus Born about 770, of noble parentage; died 20 July, 833, or 834. At the age of eighteen he entered the Benedictine monastery of Fontanelle (also called St. Vandrille after the name of its founder) in the diocese of Rouen. St. Girowald, a relative of Ansegisus, was then Abbot of Fontanelle. From the beginning […]

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July 14 – St. Vincent

July 13, 2015

St. Vincent (MALDEGARIUS). Founder and abbot of the monasteries of Hautmont and Soignies, born of a noble family at Strepy les Binche, Hainault, early in the seventh century; died at Soignies, 14 July, 677. That he was not of Irish descent, as stated by Jean du Pont and some Irish writers, has been proved by […]

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July 14 – St. Francis Solanus

July 13, 2015

South American missionary of the Order of Friars Minor; born at Montilla, in the Diocese of Cordova, Spain, 10 March, 1549; died at Lima, Peru, 14 July, 1610. His parents, Matthew Sanchez Solanus and Anna Ximenes, were distinguished no less for their noble birth than for their virtue and piety. When Francis was twenty years […]

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July 14 – The Lily of the Mohawks

July 13, 2015

Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Lily of the Mohawks Kateri Tekakwitha was daughter of Kenneronkwa, a Mohawk chief, and Tagaskouita, a devout Roman Catholic Algonquian woman. She was born in the Mohawk fortress of Ossernenon near present-day Auriesville, New York, in 1656. Kateri’s mother was baptized and educated by French missionaries in Trois-Rivières, like many of Abenaki […]

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July 15 – After conversion, he ordered the statues of the pagan gods chopped up and burned

July 13, 2015

St. Vladimir the Great Grand Duke of Kiev (Kieff) and All Russia, grandson of St. Olga, and the first Russian ruler to embrace Christianity, b. 956; d. at Berestova, 15 July, 1015. St. Olga could not convert her son and successor, Sviatoslav, for he lived and died a pagan and brought up his son Vladimir […]

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July 16 – Alfonso VIII of Castile crushes the Moors at Las Navas de Tolosa

July 13, 2015

The Almohads, the new dynasty of Moroccan fanatics who had subdued all the Moslems in al Andalus, launched an all-out attack on the Christians by moving a huge army north into south central Spain. The impetuous Alfonso VIII of Castile, without waiting for reinforcements, attempted to bar the way at Alarcos. On July 18, 1195, […]

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July 16 – Catholic Spain’s fate in the balance at the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa

July 13, 2015

The following year was a memorable one for all Spain. King Alfonso of Castile, in face of the Almohade danger, had launched an alert to Christendom; answering it, the Christian princes had assembled not only from Spain but also from other countries. Pope Innocent III proclaimed a Crusade against the Moors of Spain and bestowed […]

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In Memoriam: Marquis Luigi Coda Nunziante

July 9, 2015

In Memoriam Marquis Luigi Coda Nunziante   Yesterday, July 7, the Marquis Luigi Coda Nunziante di San Ferdinando passed away at his estate in Colognole (Firenze). An exemplary family man, a refined man of society and a fervent Catholic, he spent most of his time doing social apostolate on behalf of the Faith and of Christian civilization. […]

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The Vow of Blessed Margaret of Hungary

July 9, 2015

Bela IV, King of Hungary, seeing that he was in danger of being driven from his kingdom by the Tartars who had invaded it, made a vow to God in concert with Mary, his wife, that if He would be pleased to deliver him from his enemies, he would dedicate for ever to His holy […]

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6: The Law of Society

July 9, 2015

The law of society consists of all things, placed alongside one another, complementing and embellishing one another. Sacred Majestic Noble Excellent Decent Take the words decent, excellent, noble, majestic, and sacred. They make up an ascending gradation. Having a counter-revolutionary spirit, man will desire a society in which, alongside many decent things might exist various […]

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July 10 – Seven Holy Noble Brethren

July 9, 2015

Saints, martyred in Rome, in 150. According to legend, they were the sons of Saint Felicitas, and suffered martyrdom under Emperor Antoninus. Januarius, Felix, and Philip were scourged to death; Silvanus was thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis were beheaded. Feast, Roman Calendar, 10 July. St. Felicitas, Martyr The earliest list of the […]

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