November 8 – Charlemagne sent him to his enemies

November 6, 2014

St. Willehad Bishop at Bremen, born in Northumberland before 745; died at Blecazze (Blexen) on the Weser, 8 Nov., 789. He was a friend of Alcuin, and probably received his education at York under St. Egbert. After his ordination, with the permission of King Alchred he was sent to Frisia between 765 and 774. He […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 8 – Saint Tysilio of Wales

November 6, 2014

Saint Tysilio (died 640) was a Welsh bishop, prince and scholar, son of the reigning King of Powys, Brochwel Ysgithrog, maternal nephew of the great Abbot Dunod of Bangor Iscoed and an ecclesiastic who took a prominent part in the affairs of Wales during the distressful period at the opening of the 7th century. Prince […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 10 – Who Was the First Pope to Be Called “Great,” and Why?

November 6, 2014

Pope St. Leo I (the Great) Place and date of birth unknown; died 10 November, 461. (Reigned 440-61). Leo’s pontificate, next to that of St. Gregory I, is the most significant and important in Christian antiquity. At a time when the Church was experiencing the greatest obstacles to her progress in consequence of the hastening […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

King St. Ferdinand endures war from his father – Part 4

November 3, 2014

[Earlier] After exchanging farewells, the Castilian representatives returned to their encampment, accompanied part of their way by the negotiating team from León. The Castilian ambassadors were quite pleased with the success of their mission and approached the King’s tent to render him an account of the events. They did not find him, and his camp […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

The Secret of the Middle Ages

November 3, 2014

While an understanding of the high and sublime ideals that moved medieval society may help us in our search for economic solutions, such considerations tell only part of the story. Neither these ideals nor the dreams built upon them give an entirely adequate explanation for the flowering of the Middle Ages. Even the austere and […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 4 – Fearless and Faithful, He Reformed the Church

November 3, 2014

St. Charles Borromeo Archbishop of Milan, Cardinal-Priest of the Title of St. Prassede, Papal Secretary of State under Pius IV, and one of the chief factors in the Catholic Counter-Reformation , was born in the Castle of Arona, a town on the southern shore of the Lago Maggiore in northern Italy, 2 October, 1538; died […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 4 – Her gentleness changed his heart

November 3, 2014

Bl. Frances d’Amboise Duchess of Brittany, afterwards Carmelite nun, b. 1427; d. at Nantes, 4 Nov., 1485. The daughter of Louis d’Amboise, Viscount de Thouars, she was betrothed when only four years old, to Peter, second son of John V, Duke of Brittany, the marriage being solemnized when she had reached the age of fifteen. […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 6 – Duchess d’Alençon

November 3, 2014

Blessed Margaret of Lorraine Duchess d’Alencon, religious of the order of Poor Clares, born in 1463 at the castle of Vaudémont (Lorraine); died at Argentan (Brittany) 2 November, 1521. The daughter of Ferri de Vaudimont and of Yolande d’Anjou, little Margaret became an orphan at an early age and was brought up at Aix-en-Provençe, by […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 6 – St. Winnoc

November 3, 2014

St. Winnoc Abbot or Prior or Wormhoult, died 716 or 717. Three lives of this saint are extant: the best of these, the first life, was written by a monk of St. Bertin in the middle of the ninth century, or perhaps a century earlier. St. Winnoc is generally called a Breton, but the Bollandist […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Queen Elizabeth receives military heroes at Buckingham Palace

October 30, 2014

According to The Telegraph: Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh have hosted a reception in Buckingham Palace to honour 23 recipients of the Victoria Cross and George Cross and their families. The Victoria Cross is…awarded “for most conspicuous bravery or some daring pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice or extreme devotion to duty in […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

100 years: Prince Maurice of Battenberg

October 30, 2014

According to the Mary Evans Picture Library: On this day 100 years ago, the Great War claimed the life of a young and popular member of the royal family – Prince Maurice of Battenberg…the youngest son of Princess Beatrice and Prince Henry of Battenberg, and consequently the youngest grandchild of Queen Victoria. It is characteristic […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

King St. Ferdinand endures war from his father – Part 3

October 30, 2014

[Earlier]Alfonso IX already knew of the embassy his son had sent, and was awaiting them in his tent with the wisest and most important of his noblemen. The Castilians greeted him with due respect, and the Archbishop of Toledo, reasoning in a prudent but forceful way, illustrated the harm that this war would cause to […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Rewards of the Cross

October 30, 2014

When such a metaphysical spirit permeates everything, all society cannot but grow in quality and excellence. The lawyer presents a magnificent legal brief or a cobbler searches for a marvelous shoe for the sake of the beauty of their actions. The artist—so sensitive to such an outlook—produces his masterpiece and dies content even though he […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 31 – He forced the devil to build a church

October 30, 2014

St. Wolfgang Bishop of Ratisbon (972-994), born about 934; died at the village of Pupping in upper Austria, 31 October, 994. The name Wolfgang is of early German origin. St. Wolfgang was one of the three brilliant stars of the tenth century, St. Ulrich, St. Conrad, and St. Wolfgang, which illuminated the early medieval period […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 1 – For saving her people, she was made their judge

October 30, 2014

Deborah the Prophetess (also known as Debbora the Judge, Deborah the Matriarch) Prophetess and judge: she was the wife of Lapidoth and was endowed by God with prophetic gifts which secured for her the veneration of the divided Israelitic tribes and gave her great authority over them. Her wisdom was first displayed in settling litigious […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

All Saints Day: How many saints were noble?

October 30, 2014

All Saint’s Day: Is Being Noble and Leading a Noble’s Life Incompatible with Sanctity? The current misunderstanding of nobility and the analogous traditional elites results largely from the adroit but biased propaganda spread against them by the French Revolution. Such propaganda, continuously disseminated throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by ideological and political currents spawned […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 2 – His mother celebrated his death as if it were a wedding

October 30, 2014

Blessed John Bodey Martyr, born at Wells, Somerset: 1549; died at Andover, Wilts., 2 November, 1583. He studied at Winchester and New College, Oxford, of which he became a Fellow in 1568. In June, 1576, he was deprived, with seven other Fellows, by the Visitor, Horne, Protestant Bishop of Winchester. Next year he went to […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 3 – Patron of hunting

October 30, 2014

St. Hubert Confessor, thirty-first Bishop of Maastricht, first Bishop of Liège, and Apostle of the Ardennes, born about 656; died at Fura (the modern Tervueren), Brabant, 30 May, 727 or 728. He was honored in the Middle Ages as the patron of huntsmen, and the healer of hydrophobia (rabies). He was the eldest son of […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

November 3 – The Battle of Mentana

October 30, 2014

It was a dark and gloomy morning, pouring rain, when this little army of some five thousand men filed out of the Porta Pia in a colorful parade, Pius IX’s Swiss General Rafael de Courten’s papal troops leading and the French contingent bringing up the rear…. Famous since classical times as a suburban retreat some […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Queen grieves for Canada and the victims of the Islamist attack

October 27, 2014

According to Hello!DailyNews: “The 88-year-old monarch, who is Canada’s head of state, revealed that she was ‘shocked and saddened’. A single gunman, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, opened fire at the national war memorial in Ottawa, Canada’s capital, killing Canadian soldier Nathan Crillo.” To read the entire post at Hello!DailyNews, please click here.  

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

King St. Ferdinand endures war from his father – continued

October 27, 2014

[Earlier] A few hours later the King left at the head of his army in the direction of the town besieged by the King of León. Accompanying him were the Archbishop Ximénez de la Rada and the Bishops Don Maurice and Don Tello. Astonished, the prelates and the noblemen watched their lord, for it was […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Pursuit of Excellence

October 27, 2014

With Christ as the perfect model, this “Way of the Cross” economy also served God’s glory by awakening in men a passionate pursuit of excellence for excellence’s sake. To medieval man, this pursuit of excellence was an arduous task, not unlike a Way of the Cross that ultimately led not to profits but to God. […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 28 – Saint, Soldier, Statesman

October 27, 2014

Saint Alfred the Great In this incomparable prince were united the saint, the soldier, and the statesman in a most eminent degree. Sir Henry Spelman (Conc. Brit.) gives us his character in a rapture. “O, Alfred,” says he, “the wonder and astonishment of all ages! If we reflect on his piety and religion, it would […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 28 – Uncommon Valor

October 27, 2014

Col. John W. Ripley: Uncommon Valor By Jeremias Wells An American Knight When a society no longer respects and honors the fighting men willing to shed their blood for its principles, the fault lies not with the fighting men but with society itself. Ingratitude is a subtle vice, but a vice nevertheless. Saint Thomas Aquinas […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 29 – King turned monk, his people begged him to lead them in battle against Penda

October 27, 2014

Saint Sigebert King and martyr, date of birth unknown; died about 637, was the stepbrother of Earpwald, king of the East Angles. During the reign of Redwald he lived an exile in Gaul where he received baptism and became an ardent Christian. Earpwald died about 627, and East Anglia seems to have relapsed into anarchy […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 30 – Patroness of the Teutonic Knights

October 27, 2014

St. Dorothea of Montau, recluse, born at Montau, 6 February, 1347, died at Marienwerder, 25 June, 1394. At the age of seventeen she married the sword-cutler Albrecht of Danzig, a hot-tempered man, whose nature underwent a change through her humility and gentleness. Both made frequent pilgrimages to Cologne, Aachen, and Einsiedeln, and they intended (1390) […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 30 – St. Marcellus the Centurion, Martyr

October 27, 2014

St. Marcellus the Centurion, Martyr The birthday of the emperor Maximian Herculeus was celebrated in the year 298, with extraordinary feasting and solemnity. Pompous sacrifices to the Roman gods made a considerable part of this solemnity.Marcellus, a Christian centurion or captain of the legion of Trajan, then posted in Spain, not to defile himself with […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Baroness Herbert of Lea: a convert to the Catholic faith

October 27, 2014

Mary Elizabeth Ashe à Court-Repington was born in Richmond, Surrey, on July 21, 1822. She was the only daughter of Lieutenant-General Charles Ashe à Court-Repington, member of Parliament, and the niece of William à Court, 1st Baron Heytesbury, British Ambassador to the Russian Imperial Court at St. Petersburg. In August 1846, at the age of […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

King St. Ferdinand endures war from his father

October 23, 2014

The King received an unusual message one day. He was in his chamber when one of his noblemen quickly entered the room with the strange news that the lord of Vizcaya was waiting outside, disguised as an oxherd and very tired. Don Lope, disguised! Because it was so unusual, Ferdinand anxiously ordered him to enter […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

“Way of the Cross” Economy

October 23, 2014

The economic implications of this spirit were particularly reflected in a “Way of the Cross” economy, where the need for sacrifice and restraint in supplying human needs coincided with the consuming ideal of seeking the Cross of Christ. Medieval man looked for ways to offer up his sacrifices in the economic dealings of every day. […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 24 – Confessor to the Queen

October 23, 2014

St. Antonio María Claret y Clará Spanish prelate and missionary, born at Sallent, near Barcelona, 23 Dec., 1807; died at Fontfroide, Narbonne, France, on 24 Oct., 1870. Son of a small woollen manufacturer, he received an elementary education in his native village, and at the age of twelve became a weaver. A little later he […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 25 – The original hood

October 23, 2014

Hugh Capet King of France, founder of the Capetian dynasty, born about the middle of the tenth century; died about 996, probably 24 October. He was the second son of Hugh the Great, Count of Paris, and Hedwig, sister of Otto I, German Emperor, and was about ten years old when he inherited from his […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 25 – Memorial of Forty Martyrs of England and Wales, Many of Them Nobles

October 23, 2014

February 27 – Are You Hiding a Priest? May 4 – They believed in the religious exemption, but only at first May 22 – Queen’s Confessor                June 19 – Execution of second group of those who believed in the religious exemption, but only at first August 30 – She smuggled a priest out of prison

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 25 – Crispin and Crispian and the baron of Renty

October 23, 2014

Martyrs of the Early Church who were beheaded during the reign of Diocletian; the date of their execution is given as 25 October, 285 or 286. It is stated that they were brothers, but the fact has not been positively proved. The legend relates that they were Romans of distinguished descent who went as missionaries […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 27 – The Christian King Who Invaded Arabia

October 23, 2014

St. Elesbaan, King of Ethiopia, Confessor The Axumite Ethiopians, whose dominions were extended from the western coast of the Red Sea, very far on the continent, were in the sixth century a powerful and flourishing nation. St. Elesbaan their king, during the reign of Justin the Elder, in all his actions and designs had no […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

100 years later, Queen honors WWI fallen

October 20, 2014

According to the BBC: The Queen laid a wreath at the Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red exhibit…. By 11 November – Armistice Day – there will be 888,246 ceramic poppies, one for each British and colonial death…. Stage designer Tom Piper, who helped create the poppy installation, said the Queen described the artwork […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh pay tribute to WWI heroes

October 20, 2014

According to BBC.com … The Queen laid a wreath at the Blood Swept Lands And Seas Of Red exhibit, where each poppy commemorates a fallen WWI serviceman. By 11 November – Armistice Day – there will be 888,246 ceramic poppies, one for each British and colonial death. The Tower of London was where more than […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

The Dauphin’s heroism at Fontenoy

October 20, 2014

During the battle of Fontenoy, when French soldiers were being mowed down, the Dauphin positioned himself at the front of some troops and, sword in hand, shouted: —   “Frenchmen, forward! Let’s fight for the honor of France!” Some who were close to the Crown Prince cautioned that his life was too precious to risk in […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Making a Sacrifice

October 20, 2014

When these dedicated sectors flourished, the spirit of their constant personal self-sacrifice and restraint permeated and set the tone for all society and helped all to control and counter their disordered passions. It was by this spirit that the barbarians were gradually both restrained by force of arms and tamed by prayer and penance under […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 21 – How the Bastard Son of the King Became the Hammer of Muslim invaders

October 20, 2014

Charles Martel Born about 688; died at Quierzy on the Oise, 21 October, 741. He was the natural son of Pepin of Herstal and a woman named Alpaïde or Chalpaïde. Pepin, who died in 714, had outlived his two legitimate sons, Drogon and Grimoald, and to Theodoald, a son of the latter and then only […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 21 – His feastday is the day of his marriage, not of his death

October 20, 2014

Blessed Karl, Emperor of Austria (Also known as Carlo d’Austria, Charles of Austria) Born August 17, 1887, in the Castle of Persenbeug in the region of Lower Austria, his parents were the Archduke Otto and Princess Maria Josephine of Saxony, daughter of the last King of Saxony. Emperor Francis Joseph I was Charles’ Great Uncle. […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 21 – The Tale of Saint Ursula, the “Little Bear”

October 20, 2014

Once upon a time, there was once a just and most Christian King of Britain, called Maurus. To him and to his wife Daria was born a little girl, the fairest creature that this earth ever saw. She came into the world wrapped in a hairy mantle, and all men wondered greatly what this might […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 22 – St. Wendelin of Trier

October 20, 2014

Born about 554; died probably in 617. His earliest biographies, two in Latin and two in German, did not appear until after 1417. Their narrative is the following: Wendelin was the son of a Scottish king; after a piously spent youth he secretly left his home on a pilgrimage to Rome. On his way back […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 23 – The amazing story of San Juan Capistrano and the Siege of Belgrade

October 20, 2014

St. John of Capistrano Born at Capistrano, in the Diocese of Sulmona, Italy, 1385; died 23 October, 1456. His father had come to Naples in the train of Louis of Anjou, hence is supposed to have been of French blood, though some say he was of German origin. His father dying early, John owed his […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 23 – Gentle Birth, But Not Gentle Death

October 20, 2014

Blessed Thomas Thwing Martyr. Born at Heworth Hall, near York, in 1635; suffered at York, 23 Oct., 1680. His father was George Thwing, Esq., of Kilton Castle and Heworth, nephew of Venerable Edward Thwing; his mother was Anne, sister of the venerable confessor Sir Thomas Gasciogne, of Barnbrow Hall. Educated at Douai, he was sent […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Dom Duarte de Meneses: A great captain who was obedient unto death

October 16, 2014

When King Afonso V of Portugal was in Ceuta he made some incursions into the lands of the Moors. On one of these raids into the mountains, he was surprised by numerous enemies and resolved to withdraw and spend the night in Tetouan. Upon reaching the city he saw that his troops were retreating in […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

A “Way of the Cross” Society

October 16, 2014

Lest we be accused of glorifying the past, any dream of an ideal society cannot exclude the reality of hardship and suffering that comes from God’s punishment of our first parents: “With labor and toil shalt thou eat thereof all the days of thy life” (Gn 3:17). Dreams become nostalgic and romantic fantasies if they […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Recipe – Paletta di Mandorla

October 16, 2014

This recipe from the Umbria region of Italy is served on the feast day of St. Francis. It is supposedly one of the few foods that St. Francis let himself really enjoy. The recipe, according to tradition, originated with St. Clare.   Paletta di Mandorla (Almond Slices) 1 cup butter 1 1/2 cup sugar 4 […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 17 – St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

October 16, 2014

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Religious of the Visitation Order. Apostle of the Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, born at Lhautecour, France, 22 July, 1647; died at Paray-le-Monial, 17 October, 1690. Her parents, Claude Alacoque and Philiberte Lamyn, were distinguished less for temporal possessions than for their virtue, which gave them an honourable position. […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 17 – The Battle of Cholet

October 16, 2014

The Battle of Cholet was fought on 17 October 1793 during the French Revolutionary Wars, between French Republican forces under General Léchelle and French Royalist Forces under Louis d’Elbée. The battle was fought in the town of Cholet in the Maine-et-Loire department of France, and resulted in a Republican victory. D’Elbée was wounded and captured; […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 18 – A day that sparked the Crusades

October 16, 2014

Destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre On October 18, 1009, under Fatimid caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, orders for the complete destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called the Church of the Resurrection, were carried out. The measures against the church were part of a more general campaign against Christian places […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 18 – Adopted nobility

October 16, 2014

Pope Pius III (Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini). B. at Siena, 29 May, 1439; elected 22 Sept., 1503; d. in Rome, 18 Oct., 1503, after a pontificate of four weeks. Piccolomini was the son of a sister of Pius II. He had passed his boyhood in destitute circumstances when his uncle took him into his household, bestowed […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 19 – From Spain to Rome, Barefoot

October 16, 2014

St. Peter of Alcántara Born at Alcántara, Spain, 1499; died 18 Oct., 1562. His father, Peter Garavita, was the governor of the place, and his mother was of the noble family of Sanabia. After a course of grammar and philosophy in his native town, he was sent, at the age of fourteen, to the University […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

The Princess of Lamballe displays her magnanimity

October 13, 2014

In 1783, Montgolfier was preparing an experimental flight of his hot air balloon and planned to place live animals inside the basket. The laborer he employed insisted that he wanted to do the trip himself, but the inventor ruled this out as too risky and the rash endangering of the man’s life. At last the […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Post-mortem of a Revolution

October 13, 2014

French Revolution The last thirty years have given us a new version of the history of the French Revolution, the most diverse and hostile schools having contributed to it. The philosopher, Taine, drew attention to the affinity between the revolutionary and what he calls the classic spirit, that is, the spirit of abstraction which gave […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

Why celebrate Columbus Day?

October 13, 2014

Columbus and Divine Providence by Jeremias Wells Christopher Columbus certainly ranks as one of the greatest men of achievement the world has ever known, and also justly one of the most renowned, for the entire history of Europeans in America originated from his vision, religious sense and adventurous spirit. As can be expected in a […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 15 – St. Bruno of Querfurt

October 13, 2014

St. Bruno of Querfurt (Also called BRUN and BONIFACE). Second Apostle of the Prussians and martyr, born about 970; died 14 February, 1009. He is generally represented with a hand cut off, and is commemorated on 15 October. Bruno was a member of the noble family of Querfurt and is commonly said to have been […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 15 – Interior Castle

October 13, 2014

St. Teresa of Avila Teresa Sanchez Cepeda Davila y Ahumada, born at Avila, Old Castile, 28 March, 1515; died at Alba de Tormes, 4 Oct., 1582. The third child of Don Alonso Sanchez de Cepeda by his second wife, Doña Beatriz Davila y Ahumada, who died when the saint was in her fourteenth year, Teresa […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 15 – Casimir Pulaski

October 13, 2014

Casimir Pulaski Patriot and soldier, born at Winiary, Poland, 4 March, 1748; died on the Wasp, in the harbour of Savannah, 11 Oct., 1779; eldest son of Count Joseph Pulaski and Maria Zislinska. His father, a noted jurist, reared him for the bar, and he received his military training, as a youth, in the guard […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →

October 16 – Marie Antoinette

October 13, 2014

Queen of France. Born at Vienna, 2 November, 1755; executed in Paris, 16 October, 1793. She was the youngest daughter of Francis I, German Emperor, and of Maria Theresa. The marriage of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette was one of the last acts of Choiseul’s policy; but the Dauphiness from the first shared the unpopularity […]

Print Friendly
Share
Read the full article →