Heredity’s role in the making of General Douglas MacArthur

September 5, 2013

General Douglas MacArthur, his wife, and his son, returning to the Philippines in 1950 for a visit.

General Douglas MacArthur, his wife, and his son, returning to the Philippines in 1950 for a visit.

The story behind General Douglas MacArthur—what makes his gallant stand in World War II one of the great fighting epics of history—is told here for the first time. There are more than a thousand years of Fighting MacArthurs in his blood. One of the oldest proverbs in Scotland is: “There is nothing older, unless the hills—MacArthur and the Devil.”

The MacArthur Clan motto is "Fide et opera" which means "By fidelity and labour".

The MacArthur Clan motto is “Fide et opera” which means “By fidelity and labour”.

Original researches in Scotland reveal that the MacArthurs, thirteen centuries ago, were the senior clan of the great “Siol Diarmid au Tuirc.” Some authorities claim that they even preceded the Campbells of the famous war song: The Campbells Are Coming!

The forefathers of General Douglas MacArthur first appear in the records as warriors under Robert the Bruce (Fourteenth Century A.D.) fighting for the freedom of the Scots and laying the foundations for the independence of Scotland. In “recognition of their valor” they were awarded large grants of land out of the forfeited lands of the MacDougalls. The chief of the MacArthur-Campbells was beheaded during the reign of James I.

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Francis Trevelyan Miller, General Douglas MacArthur Rev. Ed. (Philadelphia: The John C. Winston Company, 1945), 17-18.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 314

 

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