Embedding Honor in Society

February 6, 2014

One might ask how a rule of honor can be restored. To this we would reply: Fill society with principles, ideas, and moral values and the influence of the rule of money will greatly diminish.

Chymorvah Hotel, a Bed & Breakfast in Cornwall, owned by Peter and Hazelmary Bull. The owners, long-standing policy of banning all unmarried couples from sharing a room, lost a case banning two homosexuals from booking a room.

Chymorvah Hotel, a Bed & Breakfast in Cornwall, UK, owned by Peter and Hazelmary Bull. The owners’ invoked their Christian moral principles in refusing a room to two homosexuals, but the government imposed a fine on them.

When guiding principles govern conduct, money cannot buy loyalty. When society is blessed with a rich and balanced intellectual life, it shows “far greater esteem for all that has to do with true religion, philosophy, art and literature than for what has to do with the good of the body and the exploitation of matter”—the reign of money.* When society has morals, money’s ability to facilitate sin falls upon deaf ears.

George W Vanderilbt II with his daughter Cornelia Stuyvesant Vanderbilt.

George W Vanderilbt II with his daughter Cornelia Stuyvesant Vanderbilt.

We might also highlight the role of true elites in this task. By their concern for the common good, these representative figures are in a natural position to preserve, defend, and spread Christian principles, ideas, and moral values. If faithful to the virtue, culture, refinement, and education that naturally come from their traditions, they can serve as models for all society. If society at all levels is filled with representative figures who value and embody all these things contrary to the harsh rule of money, their influence will greatly favor the return of the benevolent rule of honor.

* Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Revolution and Counter-Revolution (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), 80.

John Horvat, Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society—Where We’ve Been, How We Got Here, and Where We Need to Go (York, Penn.: York Press, 2013), 268-9.

 

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