Sister Filipina was of a princely line. Her father, Philip II of Savoy, Prince of Acaia, was born in 1344, and had to defend his rights to the paternal fief by force. He was disinherited by his stepmother,  betrayed and targeted for death. On December 20, 1368, he was chained and hurled into the icy waters of Lake Avigliana near Saint Michele delle Chiuse Abbey between Piedmont and Savoy.

Sarre Royal Castle. Photo by Rosario Lepore.

His only daughter, Umberta Felipa, was born in 1368 in the castle of Sarre. She never knew her father, and when she learned of his terrible fate, became a nun in order to obtain for him the grace of eternal salvation. She took the name of Filipina dei Storgi.

A miraculous deliverance
Prince Philip was wearing a medal around his neck at the hour of the execution. The medal belonged to his ancestor, Blessed Umberto II (1080–1103), sovereign count of Savoy and hero in the defense of the papacy against the unjust claims of Emperor Frederick Barbarrossa.

Emperor Frederick I, known as “Barbarossa”

The assassins fled when Philip’s body disappeared in the water. Yet, unbelievable as it may appear, the prince did not die. He miraculously returned to the surface without being seen by anyone, a favor he attributed to Blessed Umberto’s medal. He set out for exile, leading a penitent’s life from then on. Using a pseudonym, he went on pilgrimages to the sanctuaries of France, Switzerland and Spain, and finally Fatima in Portugal.
Why Fatima? What was there?

Fatima: land of Mary and of Crusades

The recently published documents mention “a church in a tiny city called Fatima, built by an ancestor of our Holy Foundress Margaret of Savoy, Queen Mafalda of Portugal.”7
Queen Mafalda (+1157) was married to Dom Alfonso Henriques (1128–1185), founder of the Kingdom of Portugal. She was a daughter of Amadeus III of Savoy (+1148), count of the Holy Roman German Empire, who died in the Second Crusade, and a sister of Blessed Umberto, to whom the prince owed his life.


The region of Fatima and the nearby lands were taken forcefully from the Moors by King Alfonso. Afterwards the king saw to the colonization and control of the conquered area against the continuous Moorish incursions. To achieve that end, Dom Alfonso, with the participation of Doña Mafalda, granted great extensions of those lands to two select religious orders. He also assigned castles to noble Portuguese, paladins of the Reconquest.
One favored religious order was Citeaux (Cistercians), whose “co-founder” was Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, the great Marian apostle of the Middle Ages, and cousin to the king. The Cistercians erected the celebrated Santa Maria de Alcobaça Abbey, birthplace of Portuguese culture, less than 25 miles west of Fatima.

St. Mafalda of Portugal, in an anonymous 18th century painting

The other religious order was that of the Templars, a military order of chivalry to defend the Holy Land, also created under Saint Bernard’s influence. After their suppression, hotly disputed to this day, the Templars were expelled from the rest of Europe and took refuge in Portugal. Their headquarters was located in Tomar, approximately 19 miles east of Fatima. In 1318, during the reign of Dom Diniz, they became the headquarters for the Order of Christ. The cross of the Templars-Order of Christ was on the sails of the ships of Pedro Alvares Cabral, discoverer of Brazil. That cross was the insignia that fluttered in the first years of Brazil’s history on the standards and banners of that new land, called Land of the Holy Cross.

Lithograph of Pedro Álvares Cabral

A region of battles for Christendom
This ensemble of facts explains why Fatima and its surroundings were profoundly steeped in Cistercian Marian influence and the crusading spirit of the Templars that emanated from Alcobaça and Tomar. That influence led to the construction of many Templar fortresses as well as abbeys, churches and chapels dedicated to Our Lady during the Crusades.The struggle against Islam, according to Canon Barthas, continued throughout the 12th century. Many of the beautiful feats of arms that made Portugal into a champion of the Cross against the Crescent took place in the region around Fatima.8
Fatima was located at the crossing of the routes connecting the castles of Leiria, Tomar, Santarem, Ourem and Porto de Mos, which was traveled by kings, nobles and Knights Templar. An apocryphal story, still recounted in 1917, relates that when Blessed Nuno Alvares Pereira was passing through Fatima in 1385, his horse “knelt, and seeing that, Dom Nuno is supposed to have said, ‘Here a great miracle will take place.’”9 The Blessed Constable was supposed to have planned in the Fatima mountain range the historic Battle of Aljubarrota that gained Portugal’s independence.

Count St. Nuno Álvares Pereira, Constable of Portugal

In the outskirts of Fatima was a small monastery erected by Cistercians from Alcobaça,10 and all that remains of that monastery are its foundations that serve as the foundation for the present parish church of Fatima built in the 18th century. Local stories refer to the ancient chapels where, in bygone days, hermits with fame of sanctity lived.
Queen Mafalda also encouraged the construction of many abbeys and churches in other parts of the kingdom, of which many still exist.
Which of these abbeys or churches would have been the “church constructed by Mafalda (or Matilda) of Savoy, sister of Blessed Umberto and first Queen of Portugal, in honor of Most Holy Virgin, in the place called the ‘Rock of Fatima,’” which Philip went to visit, and of which the documents speak?11
That is difficult to say, and we are left waiting for the clarifications that historical research may bring.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 799

To Be Continued….

Notes:

1. Il Cervo della Beata Margherita di Savoia, #2, 2000, Anno XLVII, Alba.
2. There are three historic documents from the convent of Alba, and these provide the basis for this article. Document 1 [hereinafter “Document 1”] is a four-page unnumbered manuscript note, dated October 7, 1640, which was added to a book written by Father Jacinto Bartesio in 1640 and containing the essential body of the revelation. Document 2 [hereinafter “Document 2”] consists of an insertion to the note- book with the inscription, “1624— Book in which are recorded the Masses, Miracles and ex-votos are offered every day to Blessed Margaret of Savoy in Alba.” The insertion is dated 1655, begins on page 52 of the notebook and it is written “with a clear and slender calligraphy” by a religious who signs “Sister C.R. M.” Document 3 [hereinafter “Document 3”] consists of notes written by Sister Lucia Mantello in 1855. She lived in the convent briefly and became a Salesian religious afterwards. She did not know of the two previous documents, where all three were “rediscovered casually on August 19 last year [1999]” and published in 2000.
3. Celicolae.
4. Document 1, supra note 2.
5. Id.
6. Id.
7. Document 2, supra note 2.
8. Canon C. Barthas and Father G. da Fonseca SJ, “Fatima, merveille inouïe, Fatima Ed., Toulouse (1943):20.
9. Father Luciano Coelho Cristino, “Descobrir o passado, preservar o futuro,” Ajefatima (1999):12.
10. Regarding the origin of the city of Fatima, see “Nossa Senhora escolheu aparecer em Fátima. Por quê?” Catoli- cismo 629 (May 2003).
11. Document 1, supra note 2.

 

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C. Objection: The Communist Successes in Italy and France

The Logo of Partito Comunista Italiano, aka: Italian Communist Party.

But, someone will object, the successes of these tactics in Italy and France do not permit one to affirm that communism is retreating in the free world, or even that the smiling communism of today is progressing more slowly than the scowling communism of the Lenin and Stalin years.

In 1981, his manifesto titled, “What Does Self-Managing Socialism Mean for Communism: A Barrier? Or a Bridgehead?” drew worldwide repercussion. It is a critical analysis of French President Mitterrand’s self-managing socialism. Click picture to read or download it.

First of all, in answer to this, one must say that the general elections in Sweden, West Germany, and Finland, as well as the regional elections and the present instability of the Labor Government in Great Britain, attest to the inappetence of the great masses for socialist “paradises,” communist violence, and so on.1. There are expressive signs that the example of these countries has already begun to reverberate in those two great Catholic Latin nations of Western Europe, thus hindering the communist advance.

François Mitterrand, the President of France from 1981 – 1995 and he was First Secretary of the Socialist Party and the first left-wing politician to assume the presidency under the Fifth Republic.

But, in our opinion, it is necessary above all to question how authentically communist is the growing number of votes obtained by the Italian Communist party or the French Socialist party (of which we speak since the French Communist party is stagnant). Both parties are far from having benefited only from the votes of their own electorates. Certainly considerable Catholic support — whose real amplitude only history will one day reveal in its full extent — has created entirely exceptional illusions, weaknesses, apathies, and complicities around the Italian Communist party.

Enrico Berlinguer, leader of the Italian Communist Party and the driving force behind Eurocommunism for Italy, serving from 1972 – 1984. Despite the largest Communist support in Italy at the time, he lost an election in 1976 to Benigno Zaccagnini.

The electoral projection of these shocking and artificial circumstances explains, in large measure, the growth in the number of people voting for the Communist party, many of whom are by no means communist voters. Nor should we forget the direct or indirect influence of certain Croesuses upon the voting. Their frankly collaborationist attitude toward communism allows electoral maneuvers from which the Third Revolution draws an obvious profit. Analogous observations can be made in regard to the French Socialist party.

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Revolution and Counter-Revolution (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Part III, Chapter II, pg. 139-141.

 

1. This vast anti-socialist saturation in Western Europe, although fundamentally a reinvigoration of the center and not of the right, is of indisputable importance in the fight between the Revolution and the Counter-Revolution. For, to the extent that European socialism senses it is losing its rank and file, its leaders will have to display a distancing from and even a wariness of communism. In turn, the centrist currents, in order and not to be taken for socialists by their own electorates, will have to manifest an even more accentuated anticommunist position. And the right wing of the centrist parties will have to declare itself to be even militantly anti-socialist.

  In other words, the leftist and centrist currents in favor of collaborating with communism will suffer what occurs to a train when the locomotive is suddenly braked. The car immediately behind it is hit with the shock and is pushed in a direction opposite the one it was traveling. In turn, this car transmits the shock to the second car with an analogous effect, and so on, down to the last car.
Could this present accentuating of the anti-socialist allergy be the first manifestation of a profound phenomenon destined to durably impoverish the revolutionary process? Or is it a mere ambiguous and passing spasm of common sense amid the contemporary chaos? What has occurred thus far does not yet provide grounds for an answer.

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St. Teresa of Avila

Teresa Sanchez Cepeda Davila y Ahumada, born at Avila, Old Castile, 28 March, 1515; died at Alba de Tormes, 4 Oct., 1582.

The third child of Don Alonso Sanchez de Cepeda by his second wife, Doña Beatriz Davila y Ahumada, who died when the saint was in her fourteenth year, Teresa was brought up by her saintly father, a lover of serious books, and a tender and pious mother. After her death and the marriage of her eldest sister, Teresa was sent for her education to the Augustinian nuns at Avila, but owing to illness she left at the end of eighteen months, and for some years remained with her father and occasionally with other relatives, notably an uncle who made her acquainted with the Letters of St. Jerome, which determined her to adopt the religious life, not so much through any attraction towards it, as through a desire of choosing the safest course…

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Casimir Pulaski

Casimir Pulaski, painted by Jan Styka.

Casimir Pulaski, painted by Jan Styka.

Patriot and soldier, born at Winiary, Poland, 4 March, 1748; died on the Wasp, in the harbour of Savannah, 11 Oct., 1779; eldest son of Count Joseph Pulaski and Maria Zislinska.

His father, a noted jurist, reared him for the bar, and he received his military training, as a youth, in the guard of Charles, Duke of Courland. Pulaski was one of those who, under the leadership of his father, formed, 29 Feb., 1768, the confederation of Bar, to free Poland from Russia. Driven into Moldavia he, returning, seized the monastery of Berdichev and for several weeks withstood with slender forces a siege by the Russians. Again finding refuge in Moldavia in 1769 after the arrest and death of his father, Pulaski in a series of brilliant marches overran and raised in revolt the greater part of Poland and Lithuania. Defeated by Suvaroff at Lomazy, near Wladowa, he fled with only ten men into the Carpathian Mountains. There he spent the winter of 1769-70, making forays into Poland, and in August, 1770, seized the fortified monastery of Czenstochowa…

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St. Bruno of Querfurt

(Also called BRUN and BONIFACE).

Second Apostle of the Prussians and martyr, born about 970; died 14 February, 1009. He is generally represented with a hand cut off, and is commemorated on 15 October. Bruno was a member of the noble family of Querfurt and is commonly said to have been a relative of the Emperor Otto III, although Hefele (in Kirchenlex., II, s.v. Bruno) emphatically denies this. When hardly six years old he was sent to Archbishop Adalbert of Magdeburg to be educated and had the learned Geddo as his teacher in the cathedral school. He was a well-behaved, industrious scholar, while still a lad he was made a canon of the cathedral. The fifteen year-old Otto III became attached to Bruno, made him one of his court, and took him to Rome when the young emperor went there in 996 to be crowned. At Rome Bruno became acquainted with St. Adalbert Archbishop of Prague, who was murdered a year later by the pagan Prussians to whom he had gone as a missionary. After Adalbert’s death Bruno was tied with an intense desire for martyrdom. He spent much of has time in the monastery on the Aventine where Adalbert had become a monk, and where Abbot Johannes Canaparius wrote a life of Adalbert. Bruno, however, did not enter the monastic life here, but in the monastery of Pereum, an island in the swamps near Ravenna…

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St. Hedwig

Duchess of Silesia, born about 1174, at the castle of Andechs; died at Trebnitz, 12 or 15 October, 1243.

She was one of eight children born to Berthold IV, Count of Andechs and Duke of Croatia and Dalmatia. Of her four brothers, two became bishops, Ekbert of Bamberg, and Berthold of Aquileia; Otto succeeded his father as Duke of Dalmatia, and Heinrich became Margrave of Istria. Of her three sisters, Gertrude married Andrew II, King of Hungary, from which union sprang St. Elizabeth, Landgravine of Thuringia; Mechtilde became Abbess of Kitzingen; while Agnes was made the unlawful wife of Philip II of France in 1196, on the repudiation of his lawful wife, Ingeborg, but was dismissed in 1200, Innocent III having laid France under an interdict. Hedwig was educated at the monastery of Kitzingen, and, according to an old biography, at the age of twelve (1186), was married to Henry I of Silesia (b. 1168), who in 1202 succeeded his father Boleslaw as Duke of Silesia. Henry’s mother was a German; he himself had been educated in Germany; and now through his wife he was brought into still closer relations with Germany. Henry I was an energetic prince, who greatly extended the boundaries of his duchy, established his authority on a firm basis, and rendered important services to civilization in the realm. For this purpose he encouraged to the utmost the spread of the more highly developed civilization existing in the German territories adjoining his to the west, so that Silesia became German in language and customs…

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Marie Antoinette playing the clavichord painted by Franz Xaver Wagenschön shortly before her marriage.

Marie Antoinette playing the clavichord painted by Franz Xaver Wagenschön shortly before her marriage.

Queen of France. Born at Vienna, 2 November, 1755; executed in Paris, 16 October, 1793. She was the youngest daughter of Francis I, German Emperor, and of Maria Theresa. The marriage of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette was one of the last acts of Choiseul’s policy; but the Dauphiness from the first shared the unpopularity attaching to the Franco-Austrian alliance. Ambassador Mercy and Abbé de Vermond, the former tutor of the archduchess in Austria and now her reader in France, endeavoured to make her follow the prudent counsels as to her conduct sent by her mother, Maria Theresa, and to enable her thus to overcome all the intrigues of the Court. Marie Antoinette’s disdain of Madame du Barry, the mistress of Louis XV, was perhaps, from a political standpoint, a mistake, but it is an honourable evidence of the high character and self-respect of the Dauphiness…

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St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

Religious of the Visitation Order. Apostle of the Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, born at Lhautecour, France, 22 July, 1647; died at Paray-le-Monial, 17 October, 1690.

Her parents, Claude Alacoque and Philiberte Lamyn, were distinguished less for temporal possessions than for their virtue, which gave them an honourable position. From early childhood Margaret showed intense love for the Blessed Sacrament, and preferred silence and prayer to childish amusements. After her first communion at the age of nine, she practised in secret severe corporal mortifications, until paralysis confined her to bed for four years…

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St. Ignatius of Antioch

Also called Theophorus (ho Theophoros); born in Syria, around the year 50; died at Rome between 98 and 117.

More than one of the earliest ecclesiastical writers have given credence, though apparently without good reason, to the legend that Ignatius was the child whom the Savior took up in His arms, as described in Mark 9:35. It is also believed, and with great probability, that, with his friend Polycarp, he was among the auditors of the Apostle St. John. If we include St. Peter, Ignatius was the third Bishop of Antioch and the immediate successor of Evodius (Eusebius, “Hist. Eccl.”, II, iii, 22). Theodoret (“Dial. Immutab.”, I, iv, 33a, Paris, 1642) is the authority for the statement that St. Peter appointed Ignatius to the See of Antioch. St. John Chrysostom lays special emphasis on the honor conferred upon the martyr in receiving his episcopal consecration at the hands of the Apostles themselves (“Hom. in St. Ig.”, IV. 587). Natalis Alexander quotes Theodoret to the same effect (III, xii, art. xvi, p. 53)…

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The Battle of Cholet was fought on 17 October 1793 during the French Revolutionary Wars, between French Republican forces under General Léchelle and French Royalist Forces under Louis d’Elbée. The battle was fought in the town of Cholet in the Maine-et-Loire department of France, and resulted in a Republican victory. D’Elbée was wounded and captured; he was later executed by Republican troops in Noirmoutier. Royalist Charles Melchior Artus de Bonchamps was fatally wounded in the battle…

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Pope Pius III

(Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini).

B. at Siena, 29 May, 1439; elected 22 Sept., 1503; d. in Rome, 18 Oct., 1503, after a pontificate of four weeks. Piccolomini was the son of a sister of Pius II. He had passed his boyhood in destitute circumstances when his uncle took him into his household, bestowed upon him his family name and arms, and superintended his training and education. He studied law in Perugia and immediately after receiving the doctorate as canonist was appointed by his uncle Archbishop of Siena, and on 5 March, 1460, cardinal-deacon with the title of S. Eustachio. The following month he was sent as legate to the March of Ancona, with the experienced Bishop of Marsico as his counsellor. “The only thing objectionable about him”, says Voigt (Enea Silvio, III, 531), “was his youth; for in the administration of his legation and in his later conduct at the curia he proved to be a man of spotless character and many-sided capacity.” He was sent by Paul II as legate to Germany, where he acquitted himself with eminent success, the knowledge of German that he had acquired in his uncle’s house being of great advantage to him…

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Destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

On October 18, 1009, under Fatimid caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, orders for the complete destruction of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called the Church of the Resurrection, were carried out. The measures against the church were part of a more general campaign against Christian places of worship in Palestine and Egypt, which involved a great deal of other damage. Adhemar of Chabannes recorded that the church of St George at Lydda “with many other churches of the saints’ had been attacked, and the ‘basilica of the Lord’s Sepulchre destroyed down to the ground’”.
European reaction was of shock and dismay, with far-reaching and intense consequences.  Ultimately, this destruction provided an impetus to the later Crusades…

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St. Wilfrid

Bishop of York, son of a Northumbrian thegn, born in 634; died at Oundle in Northamptonshire, 709. He was unhappy at home, through the unkindness of a stepmother, and in his fourteenth year he was sent away to the Court of King Oswy, King of Northumbria. Here he attracted the attention of Queen Eanfleda and by her, at his own request, he was sent to the Monastery of Lindisfarne. After three years spent here he was sent for, again through the kindness of the queen, to Rome, in the company of St. Benedict Biscop. At Rome he was the pupil of Boniface, the pope’s archdeacon. On his way home he stayed for three years at Lyons, where he received the tonsure from Annemundas, the bishop of that place. Annemundas wanted him to remain at Lyons altogether, and marry his niece and become his heir, but Wilfrid was determined that he would be a priest. Soon after persecution arose at Lyons, and Annemundas perished in it…

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October 12 – Martyr King

October 11, 2021

St. Edwin

The first Christian King of Northumbria, born about 585, son of Aella, King of Deira, the southern division of Northumbria; died October 12, 633.

Upon Aella’s death in 588, the sovereignty over both divisions of Northumbria was usurped by Ethebric of Bernicia, and retained at his death by his son Ethelfrid; Edwin, Aella’s infant son, being compelled until his thirtieth year to wander from one friendly prince to another, in continual danger from Ethelfrd’s attempts upon his life. Thus when he was residing with King Redwald of East Anglia, Ethelfrid repeatedly endeavored to bribe the latter to destroy him. Finally, however, Redwald’s refusal to betray his guest led in 616 to a battle, fought upon the river Idle, in which Ethelfrid himself was slain, and Edwin was invited to the throne of Northumbria…

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St. Edward the Confessor

Saint, King of England, born in 1003; died January 5, 1066.

He was the son of Ethelred II and Emma, daughter of Duke Richard of Normandy, being thus half-brother to King Edmund Ironside, Ethelred’s son by his first wife, and to King Hardicanute, Emma’s son by her second marriage with Canute.

When hardly ten years old he was sent with his brother Alfred into Normandy to be brought up at the court of the duke his uncle, the Danes having gained the mastery in England. Thus he spent the best years of his life in exile, the crown having been settled by Canute, with Emma’s consent, upon his own offspring by her…

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St. Daniel and Companions

Martyrdom of Saint Daniel Fasanella and companion martyrs.

Friars Minor and martyrs; dates of birth unknown; died 10 October, 1227. The martyrdom of St. Berard and his companions in 1219 had inflamed many of the religious of the Order of Friars Minor with the desire of preaching the Gospel in heathen lands; and in 1227, the year following St. Francis’s death, six religious of Tuscany, Agnellus, Samuel, Donulus, Leo, Hugolinus, and Nicholas, petitioned Brother Elias of Cortona, then vicar-general of the order, for permission to preach the Gospel to the infidels of Morocco. The six missionaries went first to Spain, where they were joined by Daniel, Minister Provincial of Calabria, who became their superior. They set sail from Spain and on 20 September reached the coast of Africa, where they remained for a few days in a small village inhabited mostly by Christian merchants just beyond the walls of the Saracen city of Ceuta. Finally, very early on Sunday morning, they entered the city, and immediately began to preach the Gospel and to denounce the religion of Mahomet. They were soon apprehended and brought before the sultan who, thinking that they were mad, ordered them to be cast into prison. Here they remained until the following Sunday when they were again brought before the sultan, who, by promises and threats, endeavoured in vain to make them deny the Christian religion. They were all condemned to death. Each one approached Daniel, the superior, to ask his blessing and permission to die for Christ. They were all beheaded. St. Daniel and his companions were canonized by Leo X in 1516. Their feast is kept in the order on the thirteenth of October.

STEPHEN M. DONOVAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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October 14 – Barber Family

October 11, 2021

Daniel Barber

Daniel Barber, soldier of the Revolution, Episcopalian minister and convert, b. at Simsbury, Connecticut, U.S.A., 2 October, 1756; d. at Saint Inigoes, Maryland, 1834. The conversion of the Barber family, despite the prejudices of a Puritan education and environment, was one of the most notable and far-reaching in its results of any recorded in the early annals of the church in New England. Daniel Barber has left a “History of My Own Times” (Washington, 1827), in which he states that his father and mother were Congregational Dissenters of strict Puritanic rule and he continued in that sect until his twenty-seventh year, when he joined the Episcopalians. Previous to this he had served two terms as a soldier in the Continental army. In his thirtieth year he was ordained a minister of the Episcopalian Church at Schenectady, New York. He married Chloe Case, daughter of Judge Owen of Simsbury, Connecticut, and about 1787, with his wife, his three sons, and a daughter, moved to Claremont, New Hampshire. He exercised the duties of the ministry for thirty years without doubt concerning the soundness of his ordination, when one day the chance reading of a Catholic book opened up for him the whole issue of the validity of Anglican orders, by impugning Parker’s consecration. This doubt was further increased by a visit for conference to the famous Bishop Cheverus, then a priest in Boston, and the inability of his Episcopalian associates to offer any satisfactory refutation of the arguments advanced by the Catholic priest. Father Cheverus also gave him a number of Catholic books, which he and the other members of his family read eagerly.

Old St. Mary, First Roman Catholic Church in New Hampshire, built by Father Virgil H. Barber, S.J. 1823-1824. Photo by Bruce Denis.

In 1807, at the instance of her parents, he baptized Fanny, daughter of General Ethan Allen, who subsequently became a convert and died a nun in the convent of the Hotel-Dieu, Montreal. A visit he made there greatly impressed him, and Miss Allen’s change of faith indirectly had much to do with his own conversion. The books Father Cheverus gave him he not only studied carefully himself, but gave them to his wife and children. His son, Virgil Horace, who was a minister in charge of an Episcopalian academy at Fairfield, near Utica, New York, was specially attracted by these books when with his wife he visited his father, and he took Milner’s “End of Controversy” back to New York. This visit resulted in the conversion of both husband and wife in 1817. The following year Virgil returned to Claremont from New York, taking with him Father Charles Ffrench, a Dominican who was officiating there at St. Peter’s church. The priest remained a week in Daniel Barber’s house preaching and saying Mass, with the result that he had seven converts, including Mrs. Daniel Barber and her children, Mrs. Noah Tyler, who was Daniel Barber’s sister, and her eldest daughter Rosetta. Mrs. Tyler was the mother of William Tyler, first Bishop of Hartford, Connecticut. Her husband and six other children were subsequently converted, and four of the daughters became Sisters of Charity.

The grave of Daniel Barber Jr. at Saint Ignatius Church Cemetery in Saint Inigoes, St. Mary’s County, Maryland.

Mrs. Daniel Barber was a woman of great strength of mind and resolution. She died in her seventy-ninth year, 8 February, 1825. Her husband was not baptized with her, but on the fifteenth of November, 1818 gave up his place as minister of the Episcopalian parish of Claremont. He then went to visit friends in Maryland and Washington, where he took the final step and entered the Church. He spent the rest of his life, after the death of his wife, in Maryland and Pennsylvania, near his son Virgil, and he died in 1834 at the house of the Society of Jesus at Saint Inigoes, Maryland. Two pamphlets, printed at Washington, “Catholic Worships and Piety Explained and Recommended in Sundry Letters to a Very Dear Friend and Others” (1821), and “History of My Own Times”, give interesting details of his life and show him to have been honest in his convictions and earnestly desirous of knowing the truth and disposed to embrace it when found.

Virgil Horace Barber

Virgil Horace Barber, son of Daniel, b. at Claremont, New Hampshire, 9 May, 1782; d. at Georgetown, D.C., 25 March, 1847. He himself said that the first step leading to his conversion was the reading through curiosity of a little book “A Novena to St. Francis Xavier” belonging to a pious Irish servant girl who was employed in his house while he was principal of the Episcopalian Academy at Fairfield, New York.

Bishop Benedict Joseph Fenwick, SJ

This raised doubts concerning his Protestant faith, which his bishop, Dr. Hobart, and other Episcopalian ministers could not solve for him. During a visit to New York City, in 1816, he called on Father Benedict J. Fenwick, S.J., with the result that he resigned his Episcopalian charge at Fairfield, and went to New York, where he and his wife Jerusha (b. New Town, Connecticut, 20 July, 1789) were received into the Church with their five children, Mary (b. 1810); Abigail (b. 1811); Susan (b. 1813); Samuel (b. 1814); and Josephine (b. 1816). At first he opened a school in New York, but this lasted only seven months, for both he and his wife determined to enter religious life, he the Society of Jesus, and she the Visitation Order. Under the direction of their friend, Father Fenwick, in June, 1817, they set out for Georgetown, D. C., where Mr. Barber and his son Samuel went to the college of the Jesuit Fathers, and his wife and the three oldest girls were received into the Visitation convent. The youngest child, Josephine, then ten months old, was taken care of by Father Fenwick’s mother. The superior at Georgetown, Father John Grassi, S.J., shortly after sailed for Rome and took Mr. Barber with him as a novice. Mr. Barber remained there a year and then returned to Georgetown, where he continued his studies until December, 1822, when he was ordained a priest at Boston. After his ordination he was sent to his old home, Claremont, New Hampshire, where he built a church and laboured for two years. He then spent some time on the Indian missions in Maine, and was after recalled to Georgetown College, where he passed the remainder of his days.

The grave of Fr. Virgilius Horace “Virgil” Barber, SJ, in Georgetown University Jesuit Cemetery, Washington, DC.

Nearly three years after their separation, 23 February, 1820, husband and wife met in the chapel of Georgetown convent to make their vows in religion. She first went through the formula of the profession of a Visitation nun, and he the vows of a member of the Society of Jesus. Their five children, the eldest being ten and the youngest three and a half years old, were present. Mrs. Barber had been admitted into the Visitation convent on the twenty-sixth of July, 1817, taking the name of Sister Mary Augustine. Her novitiate was one of severe trials, as well on account of her affection for her husband as on account of her children, who were a heavy burden to the community then in a state of extreme poverty. Her pious perseverance triumphed, and she became one of the most useful members of the order, serving in the convents of Georgetown, Kaskaskia, St. Louis, and Mobile, where she died 1 January, 1860. She had the happiness of seeing all her children embrace a religious life. Mary, the eldest, entered the Ursuline convent, Mt. Benedict, near Charlestown, Massachusetts, as Sister Mary Benedicta, 15 August, 1826, and died in the convent of the order in Quebec, 9 May, 1844. Abigail, Susan, and Josephine also became Ursulines. The first died in Quebec, 8 December, 1879, and Susan in the convent at Three Rivers, Canada, 24 January, 1837. Samuel, the son, graduated at Georgetown College in 1831 and immediately entered the Society of Jesus. After his novitiate he was sent to Rome, where he was ordained. He returned to Georgetown in 1840, and died, aged fifty years, at St. Thomas’s Manor, Maryland, 23 February, 1864.

De Goesbriand, Catholic Memoirs of Vermont and New Hampshire (Burlington, Vermont, 1886); Lathrop, A Story of Courage (Boston, 1894); Shea, The Catholic Church in the United States (New York, 1856); Idem, Memorial History of Georgetown College (Washington, 1891); U. S. Cath. Hist. Soc. Records and Studies (New York, October, 1900).

THOMAS F. MEEHAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

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According to My New Royals:

Danish Crown Princess Mary is making a 2-day official visit to the Lithuanian capital Vilnius on…the occasion of the 100th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Denmark and Lithuania.

Lithuania’s President, Gitanas Nausėda, and his wife, Diana Nausėdienė, welcomed Crown Princess Mary at the Presidential Palace in Vilnius. Afterwards, the President and First Lady hosted a luncheon.

…at the Government Building in Vilnius, the Republic of Lithuania’s Prime Minister, Ingrida Šimonytė, received The Crown Princess. Thereafter, in honor of victims of the Lithuania’s war for independence, The Crown Princess took part in a wreath laying ceremony at Antakalnis Cemetery in Vilnius.

To read the entire article on My New Royals, please click here.

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Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, El Cid

The Moors soon after this began to make fresh trouble, and invaded the kingdom of Castile with a very large force. There came with them five kings, who plundered and robbed along their path, carrying away as prisoners both men and women, as well as horses, cattle, and sheep. After they had committed these depredations, they were making haste to return to their country and get off with the spoil; but news came to Rodrigo of what they were doing, and he at once mounted his horse and rode about among his countrymen, calling upon them to follow him and give battle to the Moors. Thus he raised a great company, and pursued the enemy until he overtook them in the mountains. There Rodrigo and his companions fell upon the Moors and after a hard battle defeated them, recovered all the prisoners and the spoil, and made the five kings captive.

King Ferdinand I of León

Rodrigo then divided all the spoil among the noblemen and his other followers, and he set the five kings at liberty. These kings were so delighted with his magnanimity, that they promised to send him tribute, and became his vassals, calling him “El Seid”; that is, they acknowledged themselves dependent upon him as if he were a great king. So they returned to their own country. Thus Rodrigo had not only relieved his countrymen who were in distress, but he had won for himself allies and friends among the Moors themselves. From that time forward he began to have a great name among both the Spaniards and the Moors. . . .

Momos Square in the city of Zamora, Spain.

About this time, the king received a request from the people of the kingdom of Leon that he would re-people the city of Zamora, which had been desolate since it was destroyed by Almanzor. The king [Ferdinand I, King of León] thought well of this plan, and carried thither many men and women, and reorganized the city. During the time the king was at this place, messengers came from the five kings who were vassals of Rodrigo, bringing him their tribute. These came to Rodrigo, while he was in the presence of the king, and called him “El Seid,” or Cid, which signifies Lord; and they would have kissed his hands, but he would not permit them to do so until they had kissed the hand of [King Ferdinand]. Then Rodrigo offered one-fifth of the tribute to the king as an acknowledgment of loyalty to him as his sovereign, but the king would not receive it. [King Ferdinand], having heard the Moors call Rodrigo “Cid,” was pleased with the title, and ordered that he should be called so by the Spaniards also. So from that time forward Rodrigo began to be known as the Cid.

Calvin Dill Wilson, The Story of the Cid: For Young People (Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1901), 19 –20, 41–42.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 798

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[previous]

B. The Decline in the Capacity of Leadership

One of the many entrances to CHAZ / CHOP, (Capitol Hill Occupied Protest/Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone), in Seattle, Washington and covering 6 blocks and a park. Protestors were supporters of BLM, Antifa, Communism, Anti-police, homosexuality and immunity from prosecution from damages done by protestors. Photo by Derek Simeone.

This decrease in the Red creed’s direct persuasive power over the multitudes — which the recourse to these indirect, slow, and laborious methods denotes — is accompanied by a correlative decline in communism’s leadership capacity.

Let us examine how these correlative phenomena are manifested and what their fruits are.

— Hatred, Class Struggle, Revolution

Essentially, the communist movement is and considers itself to be a revolution born of class hatred. Violence is the method most consistent with it. This is the direct and fulminating method, from which the mentors of communism expected the greatest results with the least risk in the shortest possible time.

U.S. Border Patrol Agents behind a protective barricade around the Federal building in Portland, Oregon, July 25, 2020. Another BLM/Antifa protest.

This method presupposes a leadership capacity in the communist parties. In the past, this capacity enabled them to create discontent, transform it into hatred, articulate this hatred in an immense conspiracy, and thus succeed, with the “atomic” force of this hatred’s impetus, in destroying the present order and implanting communism.

— The Decline in Guidance of Hatred and in Use of Violence

But the capacity to guide hatred is also slipping from the hands of the communists.

We will not extend this writing by going into an explanation of the complex causes of this fact. We limit ourselves to observing that violence resulted in fewer and fewer advantages for the communists during these twenty years. To prove this, we need only recall the invariable failure of the guerrilla warfare and terrorism spread throughout Latin America.

A view of the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut caused by the terrorist Islamic Jihad Organization and Hezbollah on April 18, 1983.

It is quite true that violence has been dragging virtually all of Africa toward communism. But this says very little about the tendencies of public opinion in the rest of the world. The primitivism of most of Africa’s aboriginal populations places them in special and unequivocal conditions. The growth of violence there has been due not so much to ideological motives as to anti-colonialist resentments, which communist propaganda exploited with its customary astuteness.

— The Fruit and Proof of This Decline: The Third Revolution Metamorphoses Into a Smiling Revolution

The clearest proof that over the last twenty or thirty years the Third Revolution has been losing its capacity to create and direct the revolutionary hatred lies in its self-imposed metamorphosis.

A 1952 Ad of the False Face of Communism in the Saturday Evening Post Magazine.

During the post-Stalinist thaw with the West, the Third Revolution donned a smiling mask, exchanged polemics for dialogue, pretended to be changing its mentality and attitude, and welcomed all sorts of collaboration with the adversaries it had tried to crush through violence.

In the international sphere, the Revolution thus successively passed from the Cold War to peaceful coexistence, then to the “dropping of ideological barriers,” and finally to frank collaboration with the capitalist powers, labeled, in the language of publicity, “Ostpolitik” or “detente.”

Chinese revolutionary and statesman Deng Xiaoping, a proud follower of Marxism–Leninism, and Jimmy Carter, 1979.

In the internal sphere of the various Western countries, the politique de la main tendue (policy of the extended hand), which had been a mere artifice for deceiving a small minority of leftist Catholics during the Stalin era, became a true detente between communists and pro-capitalists. It was an ideal way for the Reds to initiate cordial relations and fraudulent approximations with all their adversaries, whether religious or temporal.

Out of this came a series of “friendly” tactics: the fellow travelers, the legalistic “Eurocommunism” (affable, and cautious toward Moscow), the “historic compromise,” and the like.

Enrico Berlinguer, leader of the Italian Communist Party and the driving force behind Eurocommunism for Italy.

As we have said, these stratagems provide advantages for the Third Revolution today. But they are slow, gradual, and dependent on a myriad of variables for their fruition.

At the height of its power, the Third Revolution ceased to threaten and attack and began to smile and request. It ceased advancing in military cadence, shod in cossack boots, in order to progress slowly at a discreet pace. It abandoned the straight path — the shortest and chose a zigzag path marked with uncertainty.

What an enormous change in twenty years!

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Revolution and Counter-Revolution (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Part III, Chapter II, pg. 137-139

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October 8 – St. Keyne

October 7, 2021

Keyne was a princess, one of the many children of King Brycan of South Wales. Growing up into a very beautiful young woman she was sought in marriage by many noble lords, but resolutely refused all of them. Instead, she took a vow of virginity and retired into solitude. It was after this resolution that […]

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October 9 – Superb and valiant knight

October 7, 2021

Baron Athanase-Charles-Marie Charette de la Contrie Born at Nantes, 3 Sept., 1832; died at Basse-Motte (Ille-et-Vilaine), 9 Oct., 1911. His father was a nephew of the famous General Charette who was shot at Nantes, 29 March, 1795, during the rising of the Vendee. His mother, Louise, Countess de Vierzon, was the daughter of the Duc […]

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October 9 – Royal penitent

October 7, 2021

Bl. Gunther A hermit in Bohemia in the eleventh century; born about 955; died at Hartmanitz, Bohemia, 9 Oct., 1045. The son of a noble family, he was a cousin of St. Stephen, the King of Hungary, and is numbered among the ancestors of the princely house of Schwarzburg. He passed the earlier of his […]

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October 9 – Even in his lifetime his reputation was for great holiness and miraculous powers

October 7, 2021

St. John Twenge Canon regular, Prior of St. Mary’s, Bridlington, born near the town, 1319; died at Bridlington, 1379. He was of the Yorkshire family Twenge, which family in Reformation days supplied two priest-martyrs and was also instrumental in establishing the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Bar Convent, York. John completed his studies […]

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October 9 – St. Louis Bertrand

October 7, 2021

St. Louis Bertrand Born at Valencia, Spain, 1 Jan., 1526; died 9 Oct., 1581. His parents were Juan Bertrand and Juana Angela Exarch. Through his father he was related to the illustrious St. Vincent Ferrer, the great thaumaturgus of the Dominican Order. The boyhood of the saint was unattended by any of the prodigies that […]

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October 10 – How to overcome bad ancestry

October 7, 2021

St. Francis Borgia (also known as Francisco de Borja y Aragon), born 28 October, 1510, was the son of Juan Borgia, third Duke of Gandia, and of Juana of Aragon; died 30 September, 1572. The future saint was unhappy in his ancestry. His grandfather, Juan Borgia, the second son of Alexander VI, was assassinated in Rome […]

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October 10 – St. Paulinus, Archbishop of York

October 7, 2021

St. Paulinus Archbishop of York, died at Rochester, 10 October, 644. He was a Roman monk in St. Andrew’s monastery at Rome, and was sent by St. Gregory the Great in 601, with St. Mellitus and others, to help St. Augustine and to carry the pallium to him. He laboured in Kent — with the […]

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October 11 – Model Archduke, both spiritual and temporal

October 7, 2021

St. Bruno the Great, Archbishop of Cologne Bruno the Great (or Bruno I) (925–965) was Archbishop of Cologne, Germany, from 953 until his death, and Duke of Lotharingia from 954. He was the brother of Otto I, king of Germany and later Holy Roman Emperor. Bruno was the youngest son of Henry the Fowler and […]

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October 11 – He dared step into the gap during the crisis

October 7, 2021

Pope Boniface VIII (BENEDETTO GAETANO) Born at Anagni about 1235; died at Rome, 11 October, 1303. Benedetto Cardinal Gaetano strongly advised Pope Celestine V to issue a constitution, either before or simultaneously with his abdication, declaring the legality of a papal resignation and the competency of the College of Cardinals to accept it. Ten days […]

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Why celebrate Columbus Day?

October 7, 2021

Columbus and Divine Providence by Jeremias Wells Christopher Columbus certainly ranks as one of the greatest men of achievement the world has ever known, and also justly one of the most renowned, for the entire history of Europeans in America originated from his vision, religious sense and adventurous spirit. As can be expected in a […]

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Columbus, and how to make Key Lime Pie

October 7, 2021

When Christopher Columbus discovered the New World on October 12, 1492–a feat that earned for him the title of Admiral of the Indies and for his grandson Louis and his descendants in perpetuity the noble title of Duke of Veragua–he introduced into the Americas the greatest treasure possible: the Catholic Faith. However, his epic Atlantic […]

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Who Was Christopher Columbus, and Why Is He Important?

October 7, 2021

Christopher Columbus (Italian CRISTOFORO COLOMBO; Spanish CRISTOVAL COLON.) Born at Genoa, or on Genoese territory, probably 1451; died at Valladolid, Spain, 20 May 1506. His family was respectable, but of limited means, so that the early education of Columbus was defective. Up to his arrival in Spain (1485) only one date has been preserved. His […]

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October 5 – Second founder of the Dominicans

October 4, 2021

Bl. Raymond of Capua Called “the second founder of the Dominicans”, Raymond della Vigna was born in Capua of a prominent family in the kingdom of Naples. He entered the Dominican Order when attending the university in Bologna and went on to fill several posts, including prior in Rome and lector in Florence and Siena… […]

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October 5 – Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos

October 4, 2021

Francis X. Seelos Born at Füssen, Bavaria, 11 January, 1819; died at New Orleans, La., 4 Oct., 1867. When a child, asked by his mother what he intended to be, he pointed to the picture of his patron, St. Francis Xavier, and said: “I’m going to be another St. Francis.” He pursued his studies in […]

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October 5 – St. Galla

October 4, 2021

A Roman widow of the sixth century; feast, 5 October. According to St. Gregory the Great (Dial. IV, ch. xiii) she was the daughter of the younger Symmachus, a learned and virtuous patrician of Rome, whom Theodoric had unjustly condemned to death (525). Becoming a widow before the end of the first year of her […]

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October 6 – Princes and popes coveted the advice of this silent man

October 4, 2021

St. Bruno Confessor, ecclesiastical writer, and founder of the Carthusian Order. He was born at Cologne about the year 1030; died 6 October, 1101. He is usually represented with a death’s head in his hands, a book and a cross, or crowned with seven stars; or with a roll bearing the device O Bonitas. His […]

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October 6 – Henri Delassus

October 4, 2021

Msgr. Henri Delassus (1836-1921), ordained a priest in 1862, served in parishes in Valenciennes (Saint-Géry) and Lille (Sainte-Catherine and Sainte-Marie-Madeleine). He was names chaplain of the basilica Notre-Dame-de-la-Treille (Lille) in 1874, an honorary canon in 1882, and domestic prelate in 1904. In 1911 he was promoted to protonotary apostolic. In 1914 he became canon of […]

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October 7 – Lepanto: Turkish might buckles in the grandest naval battle of History

October 4, 2021

The Turkish fleet came on imposing and terrible, all sails set, impelled by a fair wind, and it was only half a mile from the line of galliasses and another mile from the line of the Christian ships. D. John waited no longer; he humbly crossed himself, and ordered that the cannon of challenge should […]

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October 7 – How the Rosary saved Christendom

October 4, 2021

by Jeremias Wells The Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary Here is but a small fraction of the victories directly obtained from God through the Holy Rosary: The Battle of Lepanto which saved Rome and Vienna, and thus the Pope and the Emperor, from Moslem subjugation The deliverance of Vienna by Sobieski The victory […]

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Prince Jaime of Bourbon-Two-Sicilies marries Lady Charlotte Lindesay-Bethune

September 30, 2021

According to NewsBinding: The Duke of Noto married Lady Charlotte at The Cathedral of Monreale, nearby the town of Palermo… Charlotte, 28, is the youngest daughter of Scottish businessman James Lindesay-Bethune, 16th Earl of Lindsay, and Diana Mary Chamberlayne-Macdonald. The Duke, 29, is the heir apparent to Prince Pedro of Bourbon-Two-Sicilies and his wife, the […]

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With Tears the Flatheads and Pend d’Oreilles Bade Farewell to Father De Smet

September 30, 2021

The season was then far advanced, and the missionary was obliged to start at once in order to reach St. Louis before the winter set in. “I decided to leave,” he tells us, “on August 27th [1840]. Early in the morning of that day seventeen warriors, the pick of the two tribes, came with three […]

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Unanticipated Obstacles To The Third Revolution’s Use Of Classic Methods

September 30, 2021

[previous] 2. Unanticipated Obstacles To The Third Revolution’s Use Of Classic Methods A. The Decline of Persuasive Power Let us examine the circumstances that may force communism to choose the path of adventure. The first is the decline of the persuasive power of communist proselytism. There was a time when explicit and categorical indoctrination was […]

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October 1 – St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Chapter IV: First Communion and Confirmation & Chapter V: Vocation of Thérèse

September 30, 2021

ST. THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX Excerpts from THE STORY OF A SOUL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ST. THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX SOEUR THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX, THE LITTLE FLOWER OF JESUS ______________________________ PROLOGUE: THE PARENTAGE & BIRTH OF MARIE FRANÇOISE THÉRÈSE MARTIN and CHAPTER ONE – EARLIEST MEMORIES ______________________________ CHAPTER II: A CATHOLIC HOUSEHOLD and CHAPTER III: PAULINE ENTERS THE […]

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October 1 – The Hon. George Spencer

September 30, 2021

In religion, Ignatius of St. Paul). Passionist, born at the Admiralty, London, 21 Dec., 1799; died at Carstairs, Scotland, 1 Oct., 1864. He was the youngest son of the second Earl Spencer and Lavinia, daughter of Sir Charles Bingham. From Eton he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, received Anglican orders, 13 June, 1824, and became […]

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October 1 – The martial and pious death of Don John of Austria: “A man sent by God”

September 30, 2021

Alarm was ended on the fourth day, seeing that the fever and other ills left D. John. But the next day, which was a Saturday, he suddenly grew worse, and while the other invalids went on getting better and became convalescent, he showed other symptoms of a strange illness, palpitations which made him get up […]

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October 2 – The Holy Guardian Angels

September 30, 2021

That every individual soul has a guardian angel has never been defined by the Church, and is, consequently, not an article of faith; but it is the “mind of the Church”, as St. Jerome expressed it: “how great the dignity of the soul, since each one has from his birth an angel commissioned to guard […]

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October 2 – Falsely charged, mutilated and martyred

September 30, 2021

St. Leodegar (also Leger or Leodegarius) Bishop of Autun, born about 615; died a martyr in 678, at Sarcing, Somme. His mother was called Sigrada, and his father Bobilo. His parents being of high rank, his early childhood was passed at the court of Clotaire II. He went later to Poitiers, to study under the […]

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October 3 – Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira

September 30, 2021

(December 13, 1908 – October 3, 1995) Brazilian intellectual and Catholic activist. Corrêa de Oliveira was born in São Paulo to Lucilia Corrêa de Oliveira, a devout Roman Catholic, and educated by Jesuits. In 1928 he joined the Marian Congregations of São Paulo and soon became a leader of that organization. In 1933 he helped […]

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October 3 – Mother Théodore Guérin

September 30, 2021

Many of the early pioneers faced the hardships of this country where wars, famine and disease were the norm. Leaving everything behind, heroic souls came not only to save the souls of Indian nations, but also to minister to these frontier families. One such person was St. Mother Théodore Guérin, who became the eighth American […]

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October 3 – Military turned monk

September 30, 2021

St. Gérard, Abbot of Brogne Born at Staves in the county of Namur, towards the end of the ninth century; died at Brogne or St-Gérard, 3 Oct. 959. The son of Stance, of the family of dukes of Lower Austrasia, and of Plectrude, sister of Stephen, Bishop of Liège, the young Gérard, like most men […]

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October 3 – Enemy of King St. Louis, but still his friend in Christ

September 30, 2021

St. Thomas of Hereford (THOMAS DE CANTELUPE). Born at Hambledon, Buckinghamshire, England, about 1218; died at Orvieto, Italy, 25 August, 1282. He was the son of William de Cantelupe and Millicent de Gournay, and thus a member of an illustrious and influential family. He was educated under the care of his uncle, Walter de Cantelupe, […]

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October 4 – He chose a greater chivalry

September 30, 2021

St. Francis of Assisi Founder of the Franciscan Order, born at Assisi in Umbria, in 1181 or 1182 — the exact year is uncertain; died there, 3 October, 1226. His father, Pietro Bernardone, was a wealthy Assisian cloth merchant. Of his mother, Pica, little is known, but she is said to have belonged to a […]

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October 4 – He copied the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

September 30, 2021

St. Petronius Bishop of Bologna, date of birth unknown; died before 450. The only certain historical information we possess concerning him is derived from a letter written by Bishop Eucherius of Lyons (died 450-5) to Valerianus (in P. L., L, 711 sqq.) and from Gennadius’ “De viris illustribus”, XLI (ed. Czapla, Münster, 1898, p. 94). […]

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September 28 – Good King Wenceslaus

September 27, 2021

(Also Vaclav, Vaceslav.) Duke, martyr, and patron of Bohemia, born probably 903; died at Alt-Bunzlau, 28 September, 935. His parents were Duke Wratislaw, a Christian, and Dragomir, a heathen. He received a good Christian education from his grandmother (St. Ludmilla) and at Budweis. After the death of Wratislaw, Dragomir, acting as regent, opposed Christianity, and […]

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September 28 – Franciscan money lender

September 27, 2021

Bl. Bernardine of Feltre Friar Minor and missionary, born at Feltre, Italy, in 1439 and died at Pavia, 28 September, 1494. He belonged to the noble family of Tomitano and was the eldest of nine children. In 1456 St. James of the Marches preached the Lenten course at Padua, and inspired to enter the Franciscan […]

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September 29 – The Angelic Inspiration of Chivalry

September 27, 2021

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael _____________________ Saint Michael the Archangel: “Who is like God?” In Hebraic, mîkâ’êl, means “Who is like God?” The Scriptures refer to the Archangel Saint Michael in four different passages: two of them, in Daniel’s prophesy (chap. 10, 13 and 21; and chap. 12, 1); one in Saint Jude Thaddeus (single […]

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September 29 – Military Orders of St. Michael

September 27, 2021

Military Orders of St. Michael (1) A Bavarian Order, founded in 1721 by Elector Joseph Clemens of Cologne, Duke of Bavaria, and confirmed by Maximilian Joseph, King of Bavaria, 11 September 1808. Pius VII, 5 Feb. 1802 granted to priests decorated with this order all the privileges of domestic prelates. Under Louis I it was […]

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September 29 – In battle or in prison, he never missed Mass

September 27, 2021

Blessed Charles of Blois (1320- September 29, 1364)   Charles is the son of Guy I of Blois-Châtillon, count of Blois, by Margaret of Valois, a sister of king Philip VI of France. Early in life, he felt a call to be a Franciscan friar, but political duty kept him in secular life. Following his […]

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September 30 – The cantankerous noble who became a saint

September 27, 2021

St. Jerome, Father and Doctor of the Church Born at Stridon, a town on the confines of Dalmatia and Pannonia, about the year 340-2; died at Bethlehem, 30 September, 420. He had a brother much younger than himself, whose name was Paulinian. His father, called Eusebius, was descended from a good family, and had a […]

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Queen’s platinum jubilee to be marked with ‘gallop through history’ in honour of her love of horses

September 23, 2021

According to INews: The spectacle will be staged in the grounds of Windsor Castle next May featuring more than 1,000 performers and over 500 horses Sir Mike Rake, chairman of the Platinum Jubilee Celebration, said at the launch event, staged at the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace: “After 70 years on the throne and particularly […]

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