The following year, 1628, a young prince, Lord of Jonezava, in order to commend himself to the emperor, enjoined upon a governor to force all the Christians of his states to follow the religion of the country. This governor, who was of a gentle and concilatory disposition, in order to calm him, informed him that there were no Christians in his dominion. Another functionary, however, a rival of the former, made up a long list of Christians and sent it to the prince.

Yonezawa Castle, Yonezawa, Yamagata, Japan. Photo by Satoshin.

A little while after the prince asked the governor who among his subjects was the best captain whom he could safely promote to a higher rank. The governor proposed to him Yemondono as the most worthy of all; but the prince, knowing that he was a Christian, said that he could not entrust his states to a man of this religion. To which the governor replied that Yemondono had been a Christian, but was so no longer. “If this is the case,” answered the prince, “I will promote him.”

Upon this promise the governor went in search of Yemondono with other friends, and endeavored to persuade him to accept the advantageous offers. Yemondono replied that there was no fortune in this world that could detach him from Jesus Christ. Having been informed of this, the prince ordered the governor to put to death Yemondono, his wife, his children, and all Christians. Whereupon the governor said to him: “Shall we sacrifice more than three thousand persons?” He knew that he would lose his life if he did not obey; yet thought it expedient to represent to his young master that all the precepts of the Christian law were full of justice, and that among them was one that specially ordained that one should expose one’s life in the service of the prince. The tyrant would, however, not heed these representations, and confirmed the order that he had given, namely, that all the Christians should die.

Uesugi Sadakatsu. The second feudal lord of the Yonezawa Domain in Dewa Province.

The eldest son of Louis Yemendono, named Michael Taiemon, aged twenty-three, was at that time grievously ill; but hearing of the general condemnation of the Christians, leaped from his bed and cried out that joy had healed him. He had himself carried to the house of his venerable father, who rejoiced with him at the good news and gave thanks to God. His second son, Vincent Ichibioie, did not delay to visit the paternal roof. Two officers afterwards came who were charged with the duty to announce to Yemondono that the prince had condemned him and his whole family to die on the following day, January 12. The good old man answered that he thanked the prince for making him die for so noble a cause; then addressing his two sons, he said to them: “Now, my dear children, I have nothing more to desire, since God is pleased that I should make him a sacrifice of my life—a grace for which I have always been longing.” Michael and Vincent, animated with the same sentiments, united their thanksgivings to those of their father. The two young women, Dominica and Thecla, the wives of the two brothers, having heard of what was going on, and burning with the same desire for martyrdom, hastened to join their husbands; they each had a little daughter that they carried in their arms.

Yemondono then desired to give his servants their discharge, and to make them presents; but they refused even the salary that was due to them, and declared that they all wished to die for Jesus Christ. The servants of Michael and those of his brother spoke in the same way. Among them was a young page, less than twelve years old, who was to be sent home to his parents, but he refused to go. He afterwards consented to return to his father’s house, but only to take leave. His father endeavored to retain him by force; but the boy resolutely told him that he did not wish to lose so beautiful an occasion to prove his fidelity to his God; after this he fled from the house, and returned to join the martyrs.

The night was passed in exercises of piety and in making preparations under the direction of the saintly old man. Two hours before day the officers of justice arrived; they found the servants of God awaiting the moment of their sacrifice. Upon all a rope was put around the neck, and their hands were tied behind the back, with the exception of the women and Yemondono. Remaining thus free to receive the executioners, he went to meet them with a smiling countenance; then he was bound like the rest. All knelt down before an image of the Mother of God that was fastened to a pike. A young page was charged with carrying this holy standard, and another had to accompany him with a blessed candle that was burning. The pious cortege finally left the house in the following order: after the two pages came the women; Thecla had her little daughter in her arms, and that of Dominica was carried by her chamber-maid; then followed the men, masters and servants; and the brave Yemondono closed the procession. They all showed so great a modesty that the idolaters were themselves deepely moved. Arrived at the place of execution, they fell on their knees, and again recommended themselves to the Blessed Virgin. All, to the number of fifteen, were beheaded, the women first, the men afterwards; their venerable chief, Yemondono, was the last that was executed; he received the mortal blow while pronouncing the names of Jesus and Mary.

Rev. Eugene Grimm, ed. Victories of the Martyrs, vol. 9, The Complete Works of Saint Alphonsus de Ligouri (New York: Benzinger Brothers, 1888), 413–6.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 767

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[previous]

B. The Struggle Against Communism

We will now consider organizations whose main purpose is not the construction of a proper social order but rather the struggle against communism. For reasons already expounded in this work, we deem this kind of organization to be legitimate and often even indispensable. Of course, in saying this, we are not identifying the Counter-Revolution with abuses that organizations of this kind may have committed in one country or another.

Pro abortionists at Defund Planned Parenthood March; D.C., Feb. 11, 2017.

Nevertheless, we believe that the counter-revolutionary efficacy of such organizations can be greatly increased if their members, while remaining within the sphere of their specialized activities, keep certain essential truths in mind:

• Only an intelligent refutation of communism is efficacious. The mere repetition of catch phrases, even when clever and apt, is insufficient.

“So-called scientific communism is unknown by the multitudes, and the doctrine of Marx does not attract the masses.”

• This refutation, when made in cultured circles, must be aimed at the ultimate doctrinal foundations of communism. It is important to point out its essential character as a philosophical sect that deduces from its principles a particular concept of man, society, the State, history, culture, and so on, just as the Church deduces from Revelation and Moral Law all the principles of Catholic civilization and culture. Accordingly, no conciliation is possible between communism — a sect that contains the plenitude of the Revolution — and the Church.

• So-called scientific communism is unknown by the multitudes, and the doctrine of Marx does not attract the masses. An ideological anticommunist action among the general public must be aimed at a very widespread state of spirit that often makes anticommunists ashamed to oppose communism. This state of spirit springs from the more or less conscious idea that all inequality is unjust and that not only great fortunes but even medium-sized ones must be eliminated, for if there were no rich there would be no poor. This reveals vestiges of certain socialist schools of thought of the nineteenth century, perfumed with romantic sentimentalism. It gives rise to a mentality that claims to be anticommunist but, nevertheless, frequently calls itself socialist.

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“This state of spirit springs from the more or less conscious idea that all inequality is unjust and that not only great fortunes but even medium-sized ones must be eliminated, for if there were no rich there would be no poor.”

This mentality, which is becoming more and more powerful in the West, is a much greater danger than Marxist indoctrination itself. It leads us slowly down a slope of concessions that may reach the extreme point where nations on this side of the Iron Curtain will have become communist republics. Such concessions, which show a tendency to economic egalitarianism and state control, can be noted in every sphere. Private enterprise is more and more limited. Inheritance taxes are so onerous that in certain cases the federal treasury is the principal heir. Government interference in such things as exchange, export, and import makes industry, commerce, and banking dependent on the State. The State intervenes in wages, rents, prices, in everything. It has industries, banks, universities, newspapers, radio stations, television channels, and more. And while egalitarian statism transforms the economy in this way, immorality and liberalism are tearing the family apart and paving the way for so-called free love.

Chicago Pride Parade. Photo by nathanmac87.
“…immorality and liberalism are tearing the family apart and paving the way for so-called free love.”

Unless this mentality is specifically fought, the West will be communist in fifty or one hundred years, even should a cataclysm engulf Russia and China.

• The right of property is so sacred that, even if a regime were to give the Church full liberty and even full support, she could not accept as licit a social organization in which all property were held collectively.

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“Government interference in such things as exchange, export, and import makes industry, commerce, and banking dependent on the State.”

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Revolution and Counter-Revolution (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Part II, Chapter XI, pg. 110 -112.

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St. John Joseph of the Cross

Born on the Island of Ischia, Southern Italy, 1654; died 5 March, 1739.

From his earliest years he was given to prayer and virtue. So great was his love of poverty that he would always wear the dress of the poor, though he was of noble birth.

At the age of sixteen years he entered the Order of St. Francis at Naples, amongst the Friars of the Alcantarine Reform, being the first Italian to join this reform which had been instituted in Spain by St. Peter of Alcantara. Throughout his life he was given to the greatest austerity: he fasted constantly, never drank wine, and slept but three hours each night…

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St. Chrodegang

Bishop of Metz, born at the beginning of the eighth century at Hasbania, in what is now Belgian Limburg, of a noble Frankish family; died at Metz, 6 March, 766.

He was educated at the court of Charles Martel, became his private secretary, then chancellor, and in 737 prime minister. On 1 March, 742, he was appointed Bishop of Metz, retaining his civil office at the request of Pepin.

In his influential position St. Chrodegang labored earnestly for the welfare of Church and State, and was ever solicitous to strengthen the bonds of union between the temporal and spiritual rulers…

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Saints Kyneburge, Kyneswide, and Tibba

The two first were daughters of Penda, the cruel pagan king of Mercia, and sisters to three successive Christian Kings, Peada, Wulfere, and Ethelred, and to the pious prince Merowald…

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Guilo Cesare Cordara

Historian and littérateur, b. at Alessandra in Piedmont, Italy, 14 Dec., 1704; died there 6 March, 1785. The scion of an illustrious and ancient family that came originally from Nice, young Cordara studied at Rome under the Jesuits, and became a Jesuit himself at the age of fourteen. Subsequently he taught in various colleges of the order, soon acquiring a great reputation not only for knowledge of general literature, but especially for proficiency in poetry, rhetoric, and history…

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Ven. Gonçalo Da Silveira

Pioneer missionary of South Africa, b. 23 Feb, 1526, at Almeirim, about forty miles from Lisbon; martyred 6 March, 1561. He was the tenth child of Dom Luis da Silveira, first count of Sortelha, and Dona Beatrice Coutinho, daughter of Dom Fernando Coutinho, Marshal of the Kingdom of Portugal. Losing his parents in infancy, he was brought up by his sister Philippa de Vilhena and her husband the Marquis of Tavora…

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Saint Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart

Born July 15, 1747. Died March 7, 1770 in Florence.

She was born Anna Maria Redi to a large noble family in Arezzo, Italy. She was the daughter of Count Ignatius Redi and Camilla Billeti. After attending the boarding school of the Benedictine nuns of St. Apollonia’s in Florence, she entered the monastery of the Discalced Carmelites in Florence, taking the name Teresa Margaret of the Heart of Jesus…

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Sts. Perpetua and Felicitas

Martyrs, suffered at Carthage, 7 March 203, together with three companions, Revocatus, Saturus, and Saturninus. The details of the martyrdom of these five confessors in the North African Church have reached us through a genuine, contemporary description, one of the most affecting accounts of the glorious warfare of Christian martyrdom in ancient times. By a rescript of Septimus Severus (193-211) all imperial subjects were forbidden under severe penalties to become Christians…

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Pope Innocent XIII

(Michelangelo Dei Conti)

Born at Rome, 13 May, 1655; died at the same place, 7 March, 1724. He was the son of Carlo II, Duke of Poli. After studying at the Roman College he was introduced into the Curia by Alexander VIII, who in 1690 commissioned him to bear the blessed hat (berettone) and sword (stocco) to Doge Morosini of Venice. In 1695 he was made Titular Archbishop of Tarsus and nuncio at Lucerne, and in 1697, nuncio at Lisbon. Clement XI created him Cardinal-Priest of Santi Quirico e Giulitta on 17 May, 1706, conferred on him the Diocese of Osimo in 1709, and that of Viterbo in 1712. Sickness compelled him to resign his see in 1719…

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Antoninus Pius

(TITUS ÆLIUS HADRIANUS ANTONINUS PIUS).

Roman Emperor (138-161), born 18 September, A.D. 86 at Lanuvium, a short distance from Rome; died at Lorium, 7 March, 161.

Most of his youth was spent at Lorium, which was only twelve miles from Rome. Later on he built a villa there, to which he would frequently retreat from the cares of the empire, and in which he died, in his seventy-fifth year…

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Bl. German Gardiner

Last martyr under Henry VIII; date of birth unknown; died at Tyburn, 7 March, 1544; secretary to, and probably a kinsmen of, Stephen Gardiner, and an able defender of the old Faith, as his tract against John Frith (dated 1 August, 1534) shows. During the years of fiery trial, which followed, we hear no more of him than that “he was stirred up to courage” by the examples of the martyrs, and especially by More, a layman like himself. His witness was given eight years later, under remarkable circumstances. Henry VIII was becoming more severe upon the fast-multiplying heretics…

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St. John of God

Born at Montemor o Novo, Portugal, 8 March, 1495, of devout Christian parents; died at Granada, 8 March, 1550.

The wonders attending the saints birth heralded a life many-sided in its interests, but dominated throughout by implicit fidelity to the grace of God. A Spanish priest whom he followed to Oropeza, Spain, in his ninth year left him in charge of the chief shepherd of the place, to whom he gradually endeared himself through his punctuality and fidelity to duty, as well as his earnest piety…

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Bl. Vincent Kadlubek

(KADLUBO, KADLUBKO).

Bishop of Cracow, chronicler, born at Karnow, Duchy of Sandomir, Poland, 1160; died at Jedrzejow, 8 March, 1223.

The son of a rich family in Poland, he made such progress in his studies that in 1189 he could sign his name as Magister Vincentius (Zeissberg, in “Archiv fur osterreichische Geschichte”, XLII, Vienna, 1870, 25), from which some conclude that he was then a canon of Cracow and principal of the cathedral school. Another document of 1212 (Zeissberg, 29) bears his signature as quondam Sandomirensis praepositus

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According to the Valley Bugler Newspaper:

A Berlin court ruled…in a dispute with a historian in favor of the heirs of the Prussian monarchy. This is the latest turning point in a legal battle seeking….the return of thousands of paintings, sculptures and books to the German state, as well as compensation for the expropriation of property by the Soviet Union, whose armed forces occupied Germany.

The question of the Hohenzollern’s relationship to Hitler is of central importance for the family’s claims. According to German law, compensation is only possible if the applicant was not involved and contributed significantly to the rise of the Nazis to power.

To read the entire article in the Valley Bugler Newspaper, please click here.

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St. Agnes of Bohemia

(Also called Agnes of Prague). Born at Prague in the year 1200; died probably in 1281. She was the daughter of Ottocar, King of Bohemia and Constance of Hungary, a relative of St. Elizabeth.

At an early age she was sent to the monastery of Treinitz, where at the hands of the Cistercian religious she received the education that became her rank…

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St. John Maron

Origin of St. John Maron
John Maron was born in Sarum, a prosperous town located south of the city of Antioch. His date of birth is not mentioned but many historians place it around the third decade of the seventh century. He descended from a Frankish royal family which governed Antioch, a cosmopolitan city, that attracted professionals in all areas of expertise from both Europe and all parts of the Byzantine Empire. His parents were Agathon and Anohamia, and Prince Alidipas, his paternal Grandfather, was the nephew of Carloman, a Frankish Prince. He was called John the Sarumite in relation to Sarum where Agathon his father was governor…

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Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament

One of the…congregations of religious women in the Catholic Church and one of entirely American origin, founded by Miss Katharine Drexel at Philadelphia, Pa., in 1889, for missionary work among the Indians and coloured people of the United States. The formal approbation of the Holy See was given to the congregation in July, 1907…

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St. Cunegundes, Empress

(c. 975 – 3 March 1040 at Kaufungen), also called Cunegundes and Cunegonda

ST. CUNEGUNDES was the daughter of Sigefride, the first count of Luxemburgh, and Hadeswige his pious wife. They instilled into her from her cradle the most tender sentiments of piety, and married her to St. Henry, duke of Bavaria, who, upon the death of the emperor Otho III. was chosen king of the Romans and crowned at Mentz on the 6th of June, 1002…

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Blessed Christopher Bales

(Or Bayles, alias Evers)

Priest and martyr, b. at Coniscliffe near Darlington, County Durham, England, about 1564; executed 4 March, 1590. He entered the English College at Rome, 1 October, 1583, but owing to ill-health was sent to the College at Reims, where he was ordained 28 March, 1587…

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March 4 – This Prince had a special devotion to the Blessed Virgin

March 1, 2021

St. Casimir Prince of Poland, born in the royal palace at Cracow, 3 October, 1458; died at the court of Grodno, 4 March, 1484. He was the grandson of Wladislaus II Jagiello, King of Poland, who introduced Christianity into Lithuania, and the second son of King Casimir IV and Queen Elizabeth, an Austrian princess, the […]

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Savoir Faire, Savoir Dire

February 25, 2021

The young archduchess was the sixth daughter and ninth child of Francis of Lorraine, Emperor of Germany, and of the illustrious Maria Theresa. A story is told that one evening in the early autumn of 1755, when the empress was receiving at Schönbrunn, she laughingly asked the Duke von Tarouka, “Shall I have a boy […]

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Works of Charity, Social Service, Associations of Employers or Workers

February 25, 2021

[previous] A. Works of Charity, Social Service, Associations of Employers, Workers, and So Forth a. To the degree that these works normalize social and economic life, they are prejudicial to the development of the revolutionary process. In this sense, they are ipso facto precious auxiliaries of the Counter-Revolution, even if only in an implicit and […]

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February 26 – St. Isabel of France

February 25, 2021

St. Isabel of France Daughter of Louis VIII and of his wife, Blanche of Castille, born in March, 1225; died at Longchamp, 23 February, 1270. St. Louis IX, King of France (1226-70), was her brother. When still a child at court, Isabel, or Elizabeth, showed an extraordinary devotion to exercises of piety, modesty, and other […]

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February 26 – Blessed Robert Drury

February 25, 2021

Blessed Robert Drury Martyr (1567-1607), was born of a good Buckinghamshire family and was received into the English College at Reims, 1 April, 1588. On 17 September, 1590, he was sent to the new College at Valladolid; here he finished his studies, was ordained priest and returned to England in 1593. He laboured chiefly in […]

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February 26 – St. Alexander (of Alexandria)

February 25, 2021

St. Alexander (of Alexandria) Patriarch of Alexandria, date of birth uncertain; died 17 April, 326. He is, apart from his own greatness, prominent by the fact that his appointment to the patriarchial see excluded the heresiarch Arius from that post. Arius had begun to teach his heresies in 300 when Peter, by whom he was […]

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February 27 – Are You Hiding a Priest?

February 25, 2021

St. Anne Line English martyr, died 27 Feb., 1601. She was the daughter of William Heigham of Dunmow, Essex, a gentleman of means and an ardent Calvinist, and when she and her brother announced their intention of becoming Catholics both were disowned and disinherited. Anne married Roger Line, a convert like herself, and shortly after […]

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February 27 – “Which of you Gospellers can show such a knee?”

February 25, 2021

Ven. Mark Barkworth (Alias LAMBERT.) Priest and martyr, born about 1572 in Lincolnshire; executed at Tyburn 27 February, 1601. He was educated at Oxford, and converted to the Faith at Douai in 1594, by Father George, a Flemish Jesuit. In 1596 Barkworth went to Rome and thence to Valladolid… Read more here.

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February 27 – Patron of Youth

February 25, 2021

St. Gabriel Possenti Passionist student; renowned for sanctity and miracles; born at Assisi, 1 March, 1838; died 27 February, 1862, at Isola di Gran Sasso, Province of Abruzzo, Italy; son of Sante Possenti and Agnes Frisciotti; received baptism on the day of his birth and was called Francesco, the name by which he was known […]

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February 28 – One of the many men who spent their lives building a Christian Civilization

February 25, 2021

St. Romanus Abbot of Condat, now St. Claude in the French Jura, born about 400; died in 463 or 464. When thirty-five years old he went into the lonely region of Condat to live as a hermit, where after a while his younger brother Lupicinus followed him. A large number of scholars, among whom was […]

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February 28 – St. Oswald

February 25, 2021

St. Oswald Archbishop of York, died on 29 February, 992. Of Danish parentage, Oswald was brought up by his uncle Odo, Archbishop of Canterbury, and instructed by Fridegode. For some time he was dean of the house of the secular canons at Winchester, but led by the desire of a stricter life he entered the […]

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February 28 – Pope Saint Hilarus

February 25, 2021

Pope Saint Hilarus [Also spelled HILARIUS, or HILARY]Elected 461; the date of his death is given as 28 Feb., 468. After the death of Leo I, an archdeacon named Hilarus, a native of Sardinia, according to the “Liber Pontificalis”, was chosen to succeed him, and in all probability received consecration on 19 November, 461. Together […]

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February 28 – The Gentleman instructed in the conduct of a virtuous and happy life

February 25, 2021

William Darrell Theologian, b. 1651, in Buckinghamshire, England; d. 28 Feb., 1721, at St. Omer’s, France. He was a member of the ancient Catholic family of Darrell of Scotney Castle, Sussex, being the only son of Thomas Darrell and his wife, Thomassine Marcham… Read more here.

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March 1 – St. David of Wales

February 25, 2021

St. David (DEGUI, DEWI). Bishop and Confessor, patron of Wales. He is usually represented standing on a little hill, with a dove on his shoulder. From time immemorial the Welsh have worn a leek on St. David’s day, in memory of a battle against the Saxons, at which it is said they wore leeks in […]

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March 1 – Apostle of the Frisians

February 25, 2021

St. Suitbert (Suidbert). Apostle of the Frisians, b. in England in the seventh century; d. at Suitberts-Insel, now Kaiserswerth, near Dusseldorf, 1 March, 713. He studied in Ireland, at Rathmelsigi, Connacht, along with St. Egbert (q. v.). The latter, filled with zeal for the conversion of the Germans, had sent St. Wihtberht, or Wigbert, to […]

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February 23 – The responsibilities of leadership are heavy

February 22, 2021

Pope Benedict XIII (PIETRO FRANCESCO ORSINI) Born 2 February, 1649; died 23 February, 1730. Being a son of Ferdinando Orsini and Giovanna Frangipani of Tolpha, he belonged to the archducal family of Orsini-Gravina. From early youth he exhibited a decided liking for the Order of St. Dominic, and at the age of sixteen during a […]

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February 23 – St. Polycarp’s martyrdom

February 22, 2021

St. Polycarp’s martyrdom Polycarp’s martyrdom is described in a letter from the Church of Smyrna, to the Church of Philomelium “and to all the brotherhoods of the holy and universal Church”, etc. The letter begins with an account of the persecution and the heroism of the martyrs. Conspicuous among them was one Germanicus, who encouraged […]

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February 24 – The Cup Is Sometimes Bitter

February 22, 2021

Blessed Thomas Mary Fusco The seventh of eight children, he was born on 1 December 1831 in Pagani, Salerno, in the Diocese of Nocera-Sarno, Italy, to Dr. Antonio, a pharmacist, and Stella Giordano, of noble descent. They were known for their upright moral and religious conduct, and taught their son Christian piety and charity to […]

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February 24 – First Christian King Among the English

February 22, 2021

St. Ethelbert, King of Kent Born, 552; died, 24 February, 616; son of Eormenric, through whom he was descended from Hengest. He succeeded his father, in 560, as King of Kent and made an unsuccessful attempt to win from Ceawlin of Wessex the overlordship of Britain. His political importance was doubtless advanced by his marriage […]

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February 25 – Princess, Abbess, Miracle Worker

February 22, 2021

St. Walburga Born in Devonshire, about 710; died at Heidenheim, 25 Feb., 777. She is the patroness of Eichstadt, Oudenarde, Furnes, Antwerp, Gronigen, Weilburg, and Zutphen, and is invoked as special patroness against hydrophobia, and in storms, and also by sailors. She was the daughter of St. Richard, one of the under-kings of the West […]

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Teach Them Young

February 18, 2021

Another time, the winter having been excessively severe in Vienna, and all work consequently suspended, the suffering among the working classes was very great. As they were discussing it one evening at the palace in the family drawing-room, Marie Antoinette approached her mother, and gave her a box. “There are fifty-five ducats,” she said; “’t […]

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The Counter-Revolution and Temporal Society

February 18, 2021

[previous] CHAPTER XI The Counter-Revolution and Temporal Society The Counter-Revolution and temporal society is a theme that has been treated in depth from various standpoints in many valuable studies. This study, since it cannot encompass the entire subject, restricts itself to giving the more general principles of a counter-revolutionary temporal order1 and to analyzing the […]

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February 19 – St. Conrad of Piacenza

February 18, 2021

St. Conrad of Piacenza Hermit of the Third Order of St. Francis, date of birth uncertain; died at Noto in Sicily, 19 February, 1351. He belonged to one of the noblest families of Piacenza, and having married when he was quite young, led a virtuous and God-fearing life. On one occasion, when he was engaged […]

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February 20 – Leaders and future nobility appear in times of desperate distress

February 18, 2021

Andreas Hofer A patriot and soldier, born at St. Leonhard in Passeyrthale, Tyrol, 22 Nov., 1767; executed at Mantua, 20 Feb., 1810. His father was known as the “Sandwirth” (i. e., landlord of the inn on the sandy spit of land formed by the Passeyr. The inn had been in the family for over one […]

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February 20 – Repeatedly racked

February 18, 2021

Ven. Thomas Pormort English martyr, b. at Hull about 1559; d. at St. Paul’s Churchyard, 20 Feb., 1592. He was probably related to the family of Pormort of Great Grimsby and Saltfletby, Lincoln shire. George Pormort, Mayor of Grimsby in 1565, had a second son Thomas baptized, 7 February, 1566, but this can hardly be […]

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February 20 – Pope Martin V

February 18, 2021

Pope Martin V (Oddone Colonna) Born at Genazzano in the Campagna di Roma, 1368; died at Rome, 20 Feb., 1431. He studied at the University of Perugia, became prothonotary Apostolic under Urban VI, papal auditor and nuncio at various Italian courts under Boniface IX, and was administrator of the Diocese of Palestrina from 15 December […]

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February 21 – Shakespeare’s Inspiration

February 18, 2021

Saint Robert Southwell Poet, Jesuit, martyr; born at Horsham St. Faith’s, Norfolk, England, in 1561; hanged and quartered at Tyburn, 21 February, 1595. His grandfather, Sir Richard Southwell, had been a wealthy man and a prominent courtier in the reign of Henry VIII. It was Richard Southwell who in 1547 had brought the poet Henry […]

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February 21 – Terror of the Wicked, Supporter of the Weak

February 18, 2021

Blessed Pepin of Landen Mayor of the Palace to the Kings Clotaire II, Dagobert, and Sigebert. He was son of Carloman, the most powerful nobleman of Austrasia, who had been mayor to Clotaire I, son of Clovis I. He was grandfather to Pepin of Herstal, the most powerful mayor, whose son was Charles Martel, and […]

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February 21 – His mother almost allowed him to die

February 18, 2021

St. Peter Damian Doctor of the Church, Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia, born at Ravenna “five years after the death of the Emperor Otto III,” 1007; died at Faenza, 21 Feb., 1072. He was the youngest of a large family. His parents were noble, but poor. At his birth an elder brother protested against this new charge […]

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February 22 – From Cavalier’s Mistress to Saint

February 18, 2021

St. Margaret of Cortona A penitent of the Third Order of St. Francis, born at Laviano in Tuscany in 1247; died at Cortona, 22 February, 1297. At the age of seven years Margaret lost her mother and two years later her father married a second time. Between the daughter and her step-mother there seems to […]

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February 22 – Blessed Émilie d’Oultremont de Warfusée

February 18, 2021

(October 11, 1818 – February 22, 1878) Belgian nun. She founded the Sisters of Mary Reparatrix. She took the name Mary of Jesus. The daughter of Émile d’Oultremont (fr) and Marie-Charlotte de Lierneux de Presles, she was born at Wégimont Castle. Her father served as Belgian ambassador to the Holy See in Rome. In 1837, […]

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February 16 – Founded and ruled a religious order as his family Manorhouse, but only joined that order in his old age

February 15, 2021

St. Gilbert of Sempringham Founder of the Order of Gilbertines, born at Sempringham, on the border of the Lincolnshire fens, between Bourn and Heckington. The exact date of his birth is unknown, but it lies between 1083 and 1089; died at Sempringham, 1189… Read more here.

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February 16 – St. Juliana

February 15, 2021

St. Juliana Suffered martyrdom during the Diocletian persecution. Both the Latin and Greek Churches mention a holy martyr Juliana in their lists of saints. The oldest historical notice of her is found in the “Martryologium Hieronymianum” for 16 February, the place of birth being given as Cumae in Campania (In Campania Cumbas, natale Julianae)… Read […]

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February 16 – Ven. Luis de Lapuente

February 15, 2021

Ven. Luis de Lapuente (Also, D’Aponte, de Ponte, Dupont). Born at Valladolid, 11 November, 1554; died there, 16 February 1624. Having entered the Society of Jesus, he studied under the celebrated Suarez, and professed philosophy at Salamanca. Endowed with exceptional talents for government and the formation of young religious, he was forced by impaired health […]

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February 17 – He burned the pagan temple

February 15, 2021

St. Theodore of Amasea Surnamed Tyro (Tiro), not because he was a young recruit, but because for a time he belonged to the Cohors Tyronum (Nilles, Kal. man., I, 105), called of Amasea from the place where he suffered martyrdom, and Euchaita from the place, Euchais, to which his body had been carried, and where […]

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February 17 – Marvelous Apparition of Our Lady To Seven Young Nobles

February 15, 2021

St. Alexis Falconieri Born in Florence, 1200; died 17 February, 1310, at Mount Senario, near Florence. He was the son of Bernard Falconieri, a merchant prince of Florence, and one of the leaders of the Republic. His family belonged to the Guelph party, and opposed the Imperialists whenever they could consistently with their political principles… […]

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February 17 – He established the first charitable loan-institution for the poor

February 15, 2021

Barnabas of Terni (Interamna) Friar Minor and missionary, d. 1474 (or 1477). He belonged to the noble family of the Manassei and was a man of great learning, being Doctor of Medicine and well versed in letters and philosophy. Despising the honours and vanities of the world, he entered the Order of Friars Minor in […]

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February 17 – He suffered a three-fold death agony

February 15, 2021

Blessed Francis Regis Clet A Lazarist missionary in China; b. 1748, martyred, 18 Feb., 1820. His father was a merchant of Grenoble in France, his mother’s name was Claudine Bourquy. He was the tenth of fifteen children. The family was deeply religious, several members of it having consecrated themselves to God. Francis attended the Jesuit […]

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February 18 – Charlemagne’s envoy to the pope

February 15, 2021

St. Angilbert Abbot of Saint-Riquier, died 18 February, 814. Angilbert seems to have been brought up at the court of Charlemagne, where he was the pupil and friend of the great English scholar Alcuin. He was intended for the ecclesiastical state and must have received minor orders early in life, but he accompanied the young […]

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February 18 – Confronted the Emperor and annulled the Robber Council of Ephesus

February 15, 2021

St. Flavian Bishop of Constantinople, date of birth unknown; died at Hypaepa in Lydia, August, 449. Nothing is known of him before his elevation to the episcopate save that he was a presbyter and skeuophylax or sacristan, of the Church of Constantinople, and noted for the holiness of his life. His succession to St. Proclus […]

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