According to the Royal Central:

The only son of the Swedish king, Prince Carl Philip has joined the army and will serve as a Major during the ongoing pandemic that has hit Sweden hard.

…the royal court stated the following: “Since mid-May, Prince Carl Philip has served a reserve officer with the rank of Major at the Defence Headquarters. The Prince is now located at the Operations Command Centre, which directs and coordinates operations for all combat forces. From the command centre, the Armed Forces also support and coordinate the community for the COVID-19 pandemic. The service is performed at the Prince’s own initiative”.

To read the entire article on the Royal Central, please click here.

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Ingredients
3 ½ cups all purpose flour
4 tsp baking powder
1 stick soft butter
½ cup plus 1 Tbs granulated sugar
1 Egg
1 Cup Buttermilk

¾ – 1 cup raisins, currants or sultanas (if making fruit scones) Soak in hot water for 15 minutes to plump them up. Drain water and then add the fruit to the mix (#3). Folding into mixture.
1 egg yolk for glazing

 

Method:

1) Set the oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, add the flour, baking powder and sugar.

Add and rub in the butter until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.

2) Make a well in the center and add the beaten egg and about ¾ cup of milk. With a metal spoon bring the mixture together making sure you do not over mix it or you will tighten the dough.

3) If the mixture is a little dry add more of the remaining milk gradually. (You don’t want the mix too dry, or too set that it sticks to the rolling pin.) If adding fruit, fold them in here, making sure to evenly distribute the fruit throughout the mixture.

4) Lightly dust the table with flour and roll out the dough to about 1 ” thick. Then cut using a 2″ round cookie cutter. Place on a baking sheet about 1″ apart and brush the tops with the beaten egg yolk.

5) Bake for about 15 – 20 minutes. When cooked, lift onto a wire rack to cool.

https://youtu.be/G5TuRZq0tko

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Charles VII, the Victorious

The preparations for the coronation had to be undertaken in some haste—in such haster, in fact, that those concerned had but one night to make ready. Up till the very afternoon before the actual ceremony the citizens of Reims had not decided whether to deliver their keys to the Dauphin or not. . . .

Statue of St. Joan of Arc with her banner in the Notre-Dame Reims Cathedral, France

At nine in the morning [of July 17th, 1429], Charles rode to the cathedral in full procession, accompanied by the Duke of Alençon, the Duke de la Trémoïlle, the Count of Claremont, the Count of Vendôme, and the young de Lavals, representing the peers of France. The maréchal de Saint-Sévère, the maréchal de Rais, the seigneur de Graville, and Louis de Coulen, Admiral of France, had already gone to St. Rémy to escort the Abbot bearing the miraculously holy oil. They brought him, dressed in his pontifical vestments, richly ornamented with gold, to Notre Dame, where they were met by the archbishop, surrounded by his clergy, who, receiving the vessel from the abbot, placed it upon the altar. There were present also such other dignitaries of the Church as the Archbishop of Châlons and the Bishops of Seez and Orleans, and an enormous concourse of knights and soldiers filling the vast cathedral.

Painting by Ladislaus Bakalowicz

The ceremony was conducted with all its accustomed pomp. The Duke of Alençon knighted the King; the seigneur d’Albret held the sword. The Archbishop of Reims performed his traditional duty. But a single figure drew all eyes, the cause, as they said, after God, of this coronation and of all that assembly: Jeanne d’Arc, who kept her place standing beside the King, in armour, her standard in her hand. “Il avait été à la peine,” she said, when they asked why her standard had figured at the sacre, “c’etait bien raison qu’il fut à l’honneur.” [Since it was at the fight, it well deserves to be at the honor.]

 

  1. Sackville-West, Saint Joan of Arc (New York: The Literary Guild, 1936), 220, 222–3.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 728

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Some shallow spirits today delight in upbraiding the lofty and generous souls among us who still believe in providential men. However, when one believes in God’s action over men and peoples, there is nothing more natural than to recognize the mission of certain personages whose names have been enshrined in history.

Monument to Emperor Charlemagne on the Old Bridge in Frankfurt

God who can govern the world directly and without intermediary, deigns to have us share in the administration of His immense empire. To govern men made of spirit and flesh, He uses men made of spirit and flesh. He shapes them from all eternity and sends them at their proper time.

Charlemagne

And, without ever infringing on their free will, He uses their freely exercised virtues to act over a nation, a race, or even over the entire world. Thus was it that God prepared Charlemagne. Thus was it that He used him to shore up Christ’s threatened kingdom and the destinies of His Church in the world.

Léon Gautier, introduction to Alphonse Vétault, Charlemagne (India: Classic Reprints – Pranava Books, pod), vii–viii. (Nobility.org translation.)

 

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David Beaton

(Or Bethune)

Cardinal, Archbishop of St. Andrews, b. 1494; d. 29 May, 1546. He was of an honourable Scottish family on both sides, being a younger son of John Beaton of Balfour Fife, by Isabel, daughter of David Monypenny of Pitmilly, also in Fife. Educated first at St. Andrews, he went in his seventeenth year to Glasgow, where his uncle, James Beaton, was then archbishop, and where his name appears in the list of students of the university, in 1511. He completed his education in Paris, and in 1519 was appointed by James V Scottish resident at the French court. His first ecclesiastical preferment was to the rectories of Campsie and Cambushing, to which he was presented by his uncle, the Archbishop of Glasgow, and when the latter was translated to the primatial see in 1522, he resigned to his nephew the commendatory Abbacy of Arbroath, obtaining for him from Pope Adrian IV a dispensation from wearing the monastic habit. Beaton returned from France in 1525, took his seat in Parliament as Abbot of Arbroath, and was soon…

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St. Maximinus

Bishop of Trier, born at Silly near Poitiers, died there, 29 May, 352 or 12 Sept., 349.

He was educated and ordained priest by St. Agritius, whom he succeeded as Bishop of Trier in 332 or 335. At that time Trier was the government seat of the Western Emperor and, by force of his office, Maximinus stood in close relation with the Emperors Constantine II and Constans. He was a strenuous defender of the orthodox faith against Arianism and an intimate friend of St. Athanasius, whom he harboured as an honoured guest during his exile of two years and four months (336-8) at Trier. He likewise received with honours the banished patriarch Paul of Constantinople in 341 and effected his recall to Constantinople. When four Arian bishops came from Antioch to Trier in 342 with the purpose of winning Emperor Constans to their side, Maximinus refused to receive them and induced the emperor to reject their proposals…

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Painting of the Martyrdom of St. Laura at the Monasterio de Monjas Trinitarias in Madrid by Pedrohuerta.

Saint Laura of Constantinople (died 1453) was a Christian who lived in Constantinople during the 15th century.

She was born in Greece into a noble family: her father was a Latin knight named Michael and her mother was Albanian. Her name was Theodolinde Trasci. After she became a nun in Constantinople, she changed it into Laura, eventually rising to become an abbess.[1] She was martyred by the Ottoman Turks who took Constantinople on 29 May 1453 and scalded her to death with the other 52 sisters of her convent.[2] Her feast day is on May 29.

______________
Notes:
[1] De Renzis N., Storia di Santa Laura da Costantinopoli nel quattrocentosettantacinquesimo anno della Sua morte, Tip. Editrice R. Riccio Cosenza 1925
[2] Calvo S., Resumen de las prerrogativas del Orden de la Ssa Trinidad, Josef Longas Pamplona I p. 219

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Bartolomeu Dias

A famous Portuguese navigator of the fifteenth century, discoverer of the Cape of Good Hope; died at sea, 29 May, 1500.

Several Portuguese historians state that he was a relative or descendant of João Dias who sailed around Cape Bojador in 1434, and of Diniz Dias who is said to have discovered the Cape Verde Islands. As early as 1481 Bartolomeu Dias had accompanied Diogo d’Azambuja on an expedition to the Gold Coast…

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Saint Ferdinand III of Castile

Saint Ferdinand III of Castile. Painted by Spanish School.

Saint Ferdinand III of Castile. Painted by Spanish School.

King of Leon and Castile, member of the Third Order of St. Francis, born in 1198 near Salamanca; died at Seville, 30 May, 1252. He was the son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon, and of Berengeria, the daughter of Alfonso III, King of Castile, and sister of Blanche, the mother of St. Louis IX…

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St. Joan of Arc

In French Jeanne d’Arc; by her contemporaries commonly known as la Pucelle (the Maid).

Born at Domremy in Champagne, probably on 6 January, 1412; died at Rouen, 30 May, 1431. The village of Domremy lay upon the confines of territory which recognized the suzerainty of the Duke of Burgundy, but in the protracted conflict between the Armagnacs (the party of Charles VII, King of France), on the one hand, and the Burgundians in alliance with the English, on the other, Domremy had always remained loyal to Charles…

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St. Mechthildis in the monastery of St. Stephan

St. Mechthildis in the monastery of St. Stephan

St. Mechtildis was a Benedictine abbess and renowned miracle worker. Mechtildis was the daughter of Count Berthold of Andechs, whose wife, Sophie, founded a monastery on their estate at Diessen, Bavaria, and placed their daughter there at the age of five. In 1153, the Bishop of Augsburg placed her as Abbess of Edelstetten Abbey. Mechtildis was known for her mystical gifts and miracles. She would later die at Diessen, Germany, on 31 May 1160.

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St. Baptista Varano

(also spelled Varani).

An ascetical writer, born at Camerino, in the March of Ancona, 9 Apr., 1458; died there, 31 May, 1527.

Her father, Julius Caesar Varano or de Varanis, Duke of Camerino, belonged to an illustrious family; her mother, Joanna Malatesta, was a daughter of Sigismund, Prince of Rimini…

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Saint Hannibal Mary Di Francia

Padre Annibale Maria di Francia

Padre Annibale Maria di Francia

(1851-1927)  (sometimes written as Annibale Maria Di Francia)

Hannibal Mary Di Francia was born in Messina, Italy, on July 5, 1851. His father Francis was a knight, the Marquis of St. Catherine of Jonio, Papal Vice-Consul and Honorary Captain of the Navy. His mother, Anna Toscano, also belonged to an aristocratic family. The third of four children, he lost his father when he was only fifteen months old. The sad experience of losing a parent made him deeply sensitive to the plight of children bereft of parents and this, influenced his life and his educational system…
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Bl. John Story

(Or Storey.)

Martyr; born 1504; died at Tyburn, 1 June, 1571. He was educated at Oxford, and was president of Broadgates Hall, now Pembroke College, from 1537 to 1539. He entered Parliament as member for Hindon, Wilts, in 1547, and was imprisoned for opposing the Bill of Uniformity, 24 Jan.-2 March, 1548-9. On his release he retired with his family to Louvain, but after the accession of Queen Mary he returned to England (Aug., 1553), and became chancellor to Bishop Bonner…

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Saint Bruno of Würzburg

(c. 1005 – 26 May 1045)

Also known as Bruno of Carinthia, he was imperial chancellor of Italy from 1027 to 1034 for Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, to whom he was related, and from 1034 until his death prince-bishop of Würzburg.

Bruno was the son of Conrad I, Duke of Carinthia, and Matilda of Swabia, and thus a cousin of the Salian Emperor Conrad II. He courted Agnes of Poitou on behalf of Conrad’s son and successor Emperor Henry III. He also accompanied Henry on his second Hungarian Campaign, during which Bruno died in an accident at Persenbeug on the Danube in the present Lower Austria…

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THE APOSTLE OF ROME

St. Philip Romolo Neri

Born at Florence, Italy, 22 July, 1515; died 27 May, 1595. Philip’s family originally came from Castelfranco but had lived for many generations in Florence, where not a few of its members had practised the learned professions, and therefore took rank with the Tuscan nobility. Among these was Philip’s own father, Francesco Neri, who eked out an insufficient private fortune with what he earned as a notary. A circumstance which had no small influence on the life of the saint was Francesco’s friendship with the Dominicans; for it was from the friars of S. Marco, amid the memories of Savonarola, that Philip received many of his early religious impressions…

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St. Augustine of Canterbury

First Archbishop of Canterbury, Apostle of the English; date of birth unknown; died 26 May, 604.

Symbols: cope, pallium, and mitre as Bishop of Canterbury, and pastoral staff and gospels as missionary…

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St. William of Gellone

Born 755; died 28 May, c. 812; was the second count of Toulouse, having attained that dignity in 790. He is by some writers also given the title of Duke of Aquitaine. This saint is the hero of the ninth-century “Roman de Guillame au court nez”, but the story of his life is told in a more reliable form by the anonymous author of the biography which was written soon after the saint’s death, or before the eleventh century according to Mabillon, or during the eleventh century according to the Bollandist Henschen…

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Blessed Margaret Pole

Countess of Salisbury, martyr; born at Castle Farley, near Bath, 14 August, 1473; martyred at East Smithfield Green, 28 May, 1541.

She was the daughter of George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, and Isabel, elder daughter of the Earl of Warwick (the king-maker), and the sister of Edmund of Warwick who, under Henry VII, paid with his life the penalty of being the last male representative of the Yorkist line (28 Nov., 1499)…

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St. Mariana de Jesús de Paredes

Born at Quito, Ecuador, 31 Oct. 1618; died at Quito, 26 May, 1645. On both sides of her family she was sprung from an illustrious line of ancestors, her father being Don Girolamo Flores Zenel de Paredes, a nobleman of Toledo and her mother Doña Mariana Cranobles de Xaramilo, a descendant of one of the best Spanish families. Her birth was accompanied by most unusual phenomena in the heavens, clearly connected with the child and juridically attested at the time of the process of beatification. Almost from infancy she gave signs of an extraordinary attraction to prayer and mortification, of love of God and devotion to the Blessed Virgin; and besides being the recipient of many other remarkable manifestations of divine favour was a number of times miraculously preserved from death. At the age of ten years she made the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience…

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May 28 – St. Germain of Paris

May 25, 2020

St. Germain Bishop of Paris; born near Autun, Saône-et-Loire, c. 496; died at Paris, 28 May, 576. He studied at Avalon and also at Luzy under the guidance of his cousin Scapilion, a priest. At the age of thirty-four he was ordained by St. Agrippinus of Autun and became Abbot of Saint-Symphorien near that town. […]

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The Thunder of Battle During the Crusades

May 21, 2020

Then the trumpets and horns sound the charge. More than once during the battle the rally is blown. God grant that the retreat be not sounded tonight! The shock of the battle is terrible. The enemy turns and charges in his turn! The honor of “first blow” is eagerly sought, and to our baron falls […]

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The nuclear family and its insufficiencies

May 21, 2020

I consider the expression nuclear family to be well put, for it is not a cell-family, but rather a cell reduced to its nucleus, with everything irregular that arises when the nucleus exists without its surrounding protoplasm. For the nucleus to be deprived of its protoplasm, it is an exile, if not directly death. Presently, […]

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May 22 – St. Rita of Cascia

May 21, 2020

St. Rita of Cascia Born at Rocca Porena in the Diocese of Spoleto, 1386; died at the Augustinian convent of Cascia, 1456. Feast, 22 May. Represented as holding roses, or roses and figs, and sometimes with a wound in her forehead… Read more here.

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May 22 – Hanged for Printing a Book

May 21, 2020

Blessed James Duckett Martyr, born at Gilfortrigs in the parish of Skelsmergh in Westmoreland, England, date uncertain, of an ancient family of that county; died 9 April, 1601. He was a bookseller and publisher in London. His godfather was the well-known martyr James Leybourbe of Skelsmergh. He seems, however, to have been brought up a […]

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May 22 – Queen’s Confessor

May 21, 2020

Blessed John Forest Born in 1471, presumably at Oxford, where his surname was then not unknown; suffered 22 May, 1538. At the age of twenty he received the habit of St. Francis at Greenwich, in the church of the Friars Minor of the Regular Observance, called for brevity’s sake “Observants”. Nine years later we find […]

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May 23 – Chevalier of the Order of Leopold

May 21, 2020

Fr. Pierre-Jean De Smet Missionary among the North American Indians, born at Termonde (Dendermonde), Belgium, 30 Jan., 1801; died at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., 23 May, 1873. He emigrated to the United States in 1821 through a desire for missionary labours, and entered the Jesuit novitiate at Whitemarsh, Maryland. In 1823, however, at the suggestion […]

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May 23 – Appointed bishop to replace a corrupt one, then imprisoned for defending the King’s legitimate wife

May 21, 2020

St. Ivo of Chartres (YVO, YVES). One of the most notable bishops of France at the time of the Investiture struggles and the most important canonist before Gratian in the Occident, born of a noble family about 1040; died in 1116… Read more here.

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May 23 – St. John Baptist de Rossi

May 21, 2020

St. John Baptist de Rossi (De Rubeis). Born at Voltaggio in the Diocese of Genoa, 22 February, 1698; died at Rome, 23 May, 1764; feast on 23 May. His parents, Charles de Rossi and Frances Anfossi, were not rich in earthly goods, but had solid piety and the esteem of their fellow-citizens. Of their four […]

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May 25 – First Pope to transform a pagan temple of Rome into a Christian church

May 21, 2020

Pope St. Boniface IV Son of John, a physician, a Marsian from the province and town of Valeria; he succeeded Boniface III after a vacancy of over nine months; consecrated 25 August, 608; d. 8 May, 615 (Duchesne); or, 15 September, 608-25 May, 615 (Jaffé). In the time of Pope St. Gregory the Great he […]

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May 25 – He Forced the Emperor To Wait Three Days in the Snow

May 21, 2020

Pope St. Gregory VII (HILDEBRAND). One of the greatest of the Roman pontiffs and one of the most remarkable men of all times; born between the years 1020 and 1025, at Soana, or Ravacum, in Tuscany; died 25 May, 1085, at Salerno… Read more here.

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May 25 – She withstood the devil

May 21, 2020

St. Mary Magdalen de’ Pazzi Carmelite Virgin, born 2 April, 1566; died 25 May, 1607. Of outward events there were very few in the saint’s life. She came of two noble families, her father being Camillo Geri de’ Pazzi and her mother a Buondelmonti. She was baptized, and named Caterina, in the great baptistery. Her […]

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May 19 – Charlemagne’s Scholar

May 18, 2020

Blessed Alcuin of York Emperor Charlemagne surrounded by his officers receiving Alcuin, who is presenting manuscripts made by his Monks Painted by Victor Schnetz An eminent educator, scholar, and theologian born about 735; died 19 May, 804. He came of noble Northumbrian parentage, but the place of his birth is a matter of dispute. It […]

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May 19 – He Grabbed the Devil By the Nose

May 18, 2020

St. Dunstan of Canterbury Archbishop and confessor, and one of the greatest saints of the Anglo-Saxon Church; born near Glastonbury on the estate of his father, Heorstan, a West Saxon noble. His mother, Cynethryth, a woman of saintly life, was miraculously forewarned of the sanctity of the child within her. She was in the church […]

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May 20 – St. Bernardine of Siena

May 18, 2020

St. Bernardine of Siena Friar Minor, missionary, and reformer, often called the “Apostle of Italy”, b. of the noble family of Albizeschi at Massa, a Sienese town of which his father was then governor, 8 September, 1380; d. at Aquila in the Abruzzi, 20 May, 1444. Left an orphan at six Bernardine was brought up […]

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May 20 – Mentor of the Duke of Ferrara

May 18, 2020

Blessed Colomba of Rieti Born at Rieti in Umbria, Italy, 1467; died at Perugia, 1501. Blessed Colomba of Rieti is always called after her birthplace, though she actually spent the greater part of her life away from it. Her celebrity is based — as it was even in her lifetime — mainly on two things: […]

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May 20 – King of the East Angles

May 18, 2020

St. Ethelbert Date of birth unknown; died 794. King of the East Angles, was, according to the “Speculum Historiale” of Richard of Cirencester (who died about 1401), the son of King Ethelred and Leofrana, a lady of Mercia. Brought up in piety, he was a man of singular humility. Urged to marry, he declared his […]

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May 20 – Christopher Columbus Dies But His Glory Remains

May 18, 2020

In May, 1505, [Christopher Columbus] set out for the court of the Catholic King. The glorious Queen Isabella had passed to a better life the previous year. Her death caused the Admiral much grief; for she had always aided and favored him, while the King he always found somewhat reserved and unsympathetic to his projects. […]

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May 21 – De Soto meets the mighty Mississippi

May 18, 2020

The next day, upon which De Soto was hoping to see the chief, a large company of Indians came, fully armed and in war-paint, with the purpose of attacking the Christians. But when they saw that the Governor had drawn up his army in line of battle, they remained a cross-bow shot away for half […]

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May 21 – The last of his noble lineage, he started a spiritual one

May 18, 2020

St. Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod Bishop of Marseilles, and founder of the Congregation of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, b. at Aix, in Provence, 1 August, 1782; d. at Marseilles 21 May, 1861. De Mazenod was the offspring of a noble family of southern France, and even in his tender years he showed unmistakable […]

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May 21 – Missionary to the Mohammedans

May 18, 2020

François Bourgade A French missionary and philosopher, b. 7 July, 1806, at Gaujan, department of Gers; d. 21 May, 1866, at Paris. He pursued his theological studies at the seminary of Auch and was ordained priest in 1832. His immediate request to be authorized to work among the infidels of Africa was granted only in […]

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Queen Elizabeth II: “We are still a nation those brave soldiers, sailors and airmen would recognise and admire”

May 14, 2020

Queen Elizabeth II, in her Victory in Europe 75th Anniversary address, said: “..when I look at our country today and see what we are willing to do to protect and support one another, I say with pride that we are still a nation those brave soldiers, sailors and airmen would recognise and admire.”

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But, in the strength of the term, what is the family?

May 14, 2020

To me, family is equivalent to the family in its normality and, therefore, patriarchal. Patriarchal should mean not the small nucleus family, that is only father, mother, and children, but rather a numerous cell family, with many children, and linked to a great number of relatives of various degrees on various sides, that frequent the […]

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No Complaints On Sick Calls

May 14, 2020

On another occasion, whilst the Blessed Sacrament was being carried a great distance to a sick person, Philip [II] accompanied It all the way on foot. The priest, observing this, asked him if he were not tired. “Tired!” replied he, “behold! my servants wait upon me both by day and by night, and never yet […]

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May 15 – Beautiful Princess, Tragic Story

May 14, 2020

St. Dymphna Virgin and martyr. The earliest historical account of the veneration of St. Dymphna dates from the middle of the thirteenth century. Under Bishop Guy I of Cambrai (1238-47), Pierre, a canon of the church of Saint Aubert at Cambrai, wrote a “Vita” of the saint, from which we learn that she had been […]

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May 15 – Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac

May 14, 2020

Saint Jeanne de Lestonnac (December 27, 1556 – February 2, 1640) was founderess of the order The Company of Mary Our Lady. She was born in Bordeaux, France in 1556 to a prominent family. Her father, Richard de Lestonnac, was a member of the French Parliament while her mother, Jeanne Eyquem, was the sister of […]

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May 15 – William Lockhart

May 14, 2020

William Lockhart Son of the Rev. Alexander Lockhart of Waringham, Surry; b. 22 Aug., 1820; d. at St. Etheldreda’s Priory, Eby Place, Holborn, London, 15 May, 1892. He was a cousin of J. G. Lockhart, the well-known biographer of Sir Walter Scott. After studying first at Bedford Grammar School and, afterwards under various tutors, he […]

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May 15 – Saint’s biographer

May 14, 2020

Alban Butler Historian, b. 10 October, 1710, at Appletree, Northamptonshire, England; d. at St-Omer, France, 15 May, 1773. He shares with the venerable Bishop Challoner the reputation of being one of the two most prominent Catholic students during the first half of the dreary eighteenth century, when the prospects of English Catholics were at their […]

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May 15 – Palms on Palm Sunday lead to his cruel martyrdom

May 14, 2020

Ven. Robert Thorpe Priest and martyr, b. in Yorkshire; suffered at York, 15 May, 1591. He reached the English College at Reims 1 March, 1583-4, was ordained deacon in December following, and priest by Cardinal Guise in April, 1585. He was sent on the mission, 9 May, 1585, and laboured in Yorkshire. He was arrested […]

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May 16 – Leper King

May 14, 2020

Modern society obsessively avoids suffering, risk and danger. It secures everything with seatbelts and safety rails, air conditions the summer heat, prints warnings on coffee cups and advises that that safety glasses should be used while working with hammers. Certainly such precautions have prevented misfortune. However, since heroism and excellence are born from confronting rather […]

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May 16 – St. Honoratus of Amiens

May 14, 2020

Saint Honoratus of Amiens (Honoré, sometimes Honorius, Honortus) (d. May 16, ca. 600) was the seventh bishop of Amiens. His feast day is May 16. He was born in Port-le-Grand (Ponthieu) near Amiens to a noble family. He was said to be virtuous from birth. He was taught by his predecessor in the bishopric of […]

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May 16 – Patron of Poland

May 14, 2020

Saint Andrew Bobola Saint Andrew Bobola earned the name “Hunter of Souls” due to his tireless zeal and missionary travels. Martyr, born of an old and illustrious Polish family, in the Palatinate of Sandomir, 1590; died at Janów, 16 May, 1657. Having entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus at Wilno (1611), he was […]

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May 16 – Flos Carmeli

May 14, 2020

St. Simon Stock Born in the County of Kent, England, about 1165; died in the Carmelite monastery at Bordeaux, France, 16 May, 1265. On account of his English birth he is also called Simon Anglus… Read more here.

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The Great Siege of Malta, May 18–September 11, 1565, was won because of one man: Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Valette

May 14, 2020

On the morning of August 18th the excessively heavy bombardment of Senglea warned them that an attack was imminent. It was not slow to develop. The moment that the rumble of the guns died down, the Iayalars and Janissaries were seen streaming forward across the no-man’s-land to the south. The attack developed in the same […]

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May 18 – Martyr of Envy

May 14, 2020

Pope St. John I Died at Ravenna on 18 or 19 May (according to the most popular calculation), 526. A Tuscan by birth and the son of Constantius, he was, after an interregnum of seven days, elected on 13 August, 523, and occupied the Apostolic see for two years, nine months, and seven days. We […]

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May 18 – St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr

May 14, 2020

St. Eric, King of Sweden, Martyr Eric [1] was descended of a most illustrious Swedish family: in his youth he laid a solid foundation of virtue and learning, and took to wife Christina, daughter of Ingo IV, king of Sweden. Upon the death of King Smercher in 1141, he was, purely for his extraordinary virtues […]

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May 12 – She said no to the crowns of England, France and the Holy Roman Empire

May 11, 2020

Blessed Joanna of Portugal Bl. Joanna was very beautiful and her hand was sought by several princes, including Richard III of England, Charles VII of France, and Maximillian, heir to the Holy Roman Empire Born at Lisbon, 16 February, 1452; died at Aveiro, 12 May, 1490; the daughter of Alfonso V, King of Portugal, and […]

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May 13 – St. Peter de Regalado

May 11, 2020

St. Peter de Regalado (REGALATUS) A Friar Minor and reformer, born at Valladolid, 1390; died at Aguilera, 30 March, 1456. His parents were of noble birth and conspicuous for their wealth and virtue. Having lost his father in his early youth, he was piously educated by his mother. At the age of ten years Peter […]

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May 13 – “Can anyone receive Jesus into his heart and not die?”

May 11, 2020

Blessed Imelda Lambertini (1322 – May 13, 1333) is the patroness of First Holy Communicants. Imelda was born in 1322 in Bologna, the only child of Count Egano Lambertini and Castora Galuzzi. Her parents were devout Catholics and were known for their charity and generosity to the underprivileged of Bologna. As a very young girl, […]

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May 13 – St. John the Silent

May 11, 2020

St. John the Silent (Hesychastes, Silentiarius). Bishop of Colonia, in Armenia, b. at Nicopolis, Armenia, 8 Jan., 452; d. 558. His parents, Encratius and Euphemia, wealthy and honoured, belonged to families that had done great service in the State and had given to it renowned generals and governors, but they were also good Christians, and […]

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