After crossing the Bitter Root Mountains he came to the country of the Coeur d’Alènes, a fertile, lovely valley stretching westward hundreds of miles. Clusters of dark pines and cedars emerged from the green plain, in the center of which lay a lake well stocked with fish. A river ran through the valley, and to the north, east, and south, snow-capped mountains pierced the clouds. Formerly the Coeur d’Alènes were considered the most barbarous and degraded of the mountain tribes; they adored animals, and lived in complete ignorance of God, the soul, and a future life. Even the precepts of natural law were but vaguely understood and pretty generally offended against in practice. About 1830, an Iroquois Catholic, it is supposed, taught them the first elements of Christianity. Shortly after this date, the tribe suffered the ravages of a violent eipdemic. When the plague was at its height, a dying man heard a voice saying: “Leave your idols, adore Jesus Christ, and you will be cured.” He obeyed, and was restored to health. Then, making a tour of the camp, the restored man related what had taken place and entreated his stricken brethren to follow his example. They did so and all likewise were cured.* This event produced a profound impression on the Coeur d’Alènes, but without a priest to further instruct them a few of the tribe returned to the worship of idols; the conduct of many, however, since the revelation of the true God, had remained irreproachable.

Bitterroot Mountains, located in the panhandle of Idaho and westernmost Montana in the Northwestern United States.

Such was the condition of the Coeur d’Alènes when Father De Smet visited the tribe in 1842. “I was conducted in triumph to the lodge of the chief,” he tells us, “and there, as in every other Indian camp, the calumet was brought forth. After it had been handed around several times and smoked in solemn silence the chief addressed me in the following words:

“‘Black Robe, welcome to our country. Long have we desired to see you and be enlightened by your words. Our fathers worshiped the earth and the sun. I remember distinctly the day we first heard of the one and only true God. Since then it is to Him we have addressed our prayers and supplications, and yet we are much to be pitied. We do not know the teachings of the Great Spirit, and we sit in darkness. But now I hope you have come to bring us light. I have finished. Speak, Black Robe! Every ear is open and eager to hear your words.’

Father de Smet celebrating Mass.

“During the two hours in which I spoke to them of salvation and the end of man, absolute silence and stillness reigned. The sun was just setting, and I recited the prayer I had some days before translated into their tongue. Refreshments were then offered, consisting of scraps of dried meat, a black moss cake that tasted like soap, and a glass of river-water, all of which were as nectar and ambrosia to a man who had not tasted food since sunrise. The chiefs expressing a desire to hear me again, I continued to instruct the tribe until far into the night, pausing every half-hour to hand around the calumet and give time for reflection. During these pauses the chiefs conversed about what they had just heard, explaining it to their subordinates.

“Upon awakening in the morning I found my tent invaded by Indians who had slipped in before dawn. Getting up at once, I knelt down, the Indians following my example, and together we offered our day and our hearts to God. ‘Black Robe,’ said the chief, ‘we came here early this morning to watch you and imitate you. Your prayer is good, and we wish to adopt it. But you will stay here only two nights, and we have no one to teach it to us.’ I rang the bell for morning prayers, and promised the chief they all would know the prayer before my departure.”

A priest with the Indians. Photo from Bureau Of Catholic Indian Missions – Catholic Missionaries To Native Americans.

Then it was that Father De Smet laid down the method that would henceforth be used for teaching the tribes their prayers. He assembled the Indians, ranging the children in a circle, with instructions to keep the same place at every reunion. Then each one was made to learn a phrase of the prayer by heart. Two children repeated the Hail Mary, seven the Our Father, ten the Commandments, and twelve the Apostles’ Creed. After repeating to each child his particular phrase until he knew it by heart, the missionary then made them recite the phrases each in turn. This made a continued prayer, which the tribe listened to night and morning. After a few days one of the chiefs knew all the prayers by heart, and from that time he recited them for the tribe.

Two days after his arrival at the Coeur d’Alène camp, Father De Smet baptized the children, the sick, and the old men and women of the tribe. It seemed as though God had only kept these last on earth to accord them this supreme favor. In listening to their expressions of joy and gratitude one seemed to hear again Simeon’s praises to the Lord.

Fr. De Smet on his favorite mule, “Lizette”, with Indian escort. Courtesy Gonzaga University.

Torn with regret, the missionary took leave of his new Christians, promising to send them a priest to complete their instruction. “Never has a visit to the Indians given me so much consolation, and nowhere have I seen such unmistakable proof of true conversion, not even excepting the Flatheads in 1840.” The future but confirmed his judgment, for the Coeur d’Alènes remained, the most industrious and Christian of the mountain tribes.

* Father Point, who relates this fact, adds: “I heard the above from the lips of the Indian to whom it happened, who wept tears of gratitude in relating it. Furthermore, eyewitness confirmed his statement.” (See De Smet, “Missions de l”oregon,” p. 243; Father Point, Recollections of the Rocky Mountains in “The Woodstock Letters,” 1883, p. 153.

E. Laveille, S.J., The Life of Father De Smet, S.J. (1801–1873), trans. Marian Lindsay (New York: P. J. Kenedy & Sons, 1915), 142–4.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 805

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Richard M. Nixon at the Vatican meeting with Pope Paul VI in 1970.

It would be impossible to describe this psychological warfare without carefully examining its development in what is the very soul of the West, that is, Christianity, and more precisely the Catholic religion, which is Christianity in its absolute fullness and unique authenticity.

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, Revolution and Counter-Revolution (York, Penn.: The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family, and Property, 1993), Part III, Chapter II, pg. 144.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Queen Isabella I (“The Catholic”)

Queen of Castile; born in the town of Madrigal de las Altas Torres, 22 April, 1451; died a little before noon, 26 November, 1504, in the castle of La Mota, which still stands at Medina del Campo (Valladolid).

The death of Queen Isabella the Catholic. Painted by Eduardo Rosales

She was the daughter of John II, King of Castile, by his second wife, Isabella of Portugal. Being only a little more than three years of age when her father died (1454), she was brought up carefully and piously by her mother, at Arevalo, until her thirteenth year. Her brother, King Henry IV, then took her, together with her other brother, Alfonso, to his court, on the pretext of completing her education, but in reality, as Flórez tells us, to prevent the two royal children from serving as a standard to which the discontented nobles might rally…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Leonard of Port Maurice

Preacher and ascetic writer, b. 20 Dec., 1676, at Porto Maurizio on the Riviera di Ponente; d. at the monastery of S. Bonaventura, Rome, 26 Nov., 1751. The son of Domenico Casanova and Anna Maria Benza, he joined after a brilliant course of study with the Jesuits in Rome (Collegio Romano), the so- called Riformella, an offshoot of the Reformati branch of the Franciscan Order. On 2 October, 1697, he received the habit, and after making his novitiate at Ponticelli in the Sabine mountains, he completed his studies at the principal house of the Riformella, S. Bonaventura on the Palatine at Rome. After his ordination he remained there as lector (professor), and expected to be sent on the Chinese missions. But he was soon afterwards seized with severe gastric haemorrhage, and became so ill that he was sent to his native climate of Porto Maurizio, where there was a monastery of the Franciscan Observants (1704). After four years he was restored to health, and began to preach in Porto Maurizio and the vicinity…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Founder of the Sylvestrines, b. of the noble family of the Gozzolini at Osimo, 1177; d. 26 Nov., 1267. He was sent to study jurisprudence at Bologna and Padua, but, feeling within himself a call to the ecclesiastical state, abandoned the study of law for that of theology and Holy Scripture, giving long hours daily to prayer. On his return home we are told that his father, angered at his change of purpose, refused to speak to him for ten years. Sylvester now accepted a canonry at Osimo and devoted himself to pastoral work with such zeal as to arouse the hostility of his bishop, whom he had respectfully rebuked for the scandals caused by the prelate’s irregular life. The saint was threatened with the loss of his canonry, but decided to leave the world on seeing the decaying corpse of one who had formerly been noted for great beauty. In 1227 he retired to a desert place about thirty miles from Osimo and lived there in the utmost poverty until he was recognized by the owner of the land, a certain nobleman named Conrad, who offered him a better site for his hermitage…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Clovis

Son of Childeric, King of the Salic Franks; born in the year 466; died at Paris, 27 November, 511. He succeeded his father as the King of the Franks of Tournai in 481. His kingdom was probably one of the States that sprang from the division of Clodion’s monarchy like those of Cambrai, Tongres and Cologne. Although a Pagan, Childeric had kept up friendly relations with the bishops of Gaul, and when Clovis ascended the throne he received a most cordial letter of congratulation from St. Remigius, Archbishop of Reims. The young king early began his course of conquest by attacking Syagrius, son of Aegidius, the Roman Count. Having established himself at Soissons, he acquired sovereign authority over so great a part of Northern Gaul as to be known to his contemporaries as the King of Soissons. Syagrius, being defeated, fled for protection to Alaric II, King of the Visigoths, but the latter, alarmed by a summons from Clovis, delivered Syagrius to his conqueror, who had him decapitated in 486…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Maximus, Bishop of Riez, Confessor

About the Year 460.

ST. MAXIMUS was born in Provence at Decomer, now called Chateau-Redon, near Digne. His truly Christian parents saw him baptized in his infancy, and brought him up in the love and practice of virtue, and an enemy to its bane, the pleasure of the senses, which the saint from his childhood made it his study to subdue and often mortify, so that in his youth he was an excellent example of profound humility, and an absolute conquest of his passions; and his virtue increased with his years. He was well made, and by the sweetness of his temper, and the overflowings of a generous heart, engaged the esteem of all who knew him; but was aware of the dangerous snare of being betrayed into a love of company and the world; and, leading a very retired life in his father’s house, gave himself up to prayer, reading, and serious studies, in which he gave early displays of genius. His mind and heart were so engaged by heavenly things that he trampled on all worldly advantages, and made a resolution of observing a perpetual continence…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Lessons in Psychological Warfare from the Siege of Jasna Góra, November 28-December 27, 1655

This account of the siege of  Częstochowa is based on the Memoirs of the Siege of Czestochowa by Father Augustine Kordecki (Pamietnik oblezenia Częstochowy, edited and with a preface by Jan Tokarski, London, Veritas, 1956.) Written by Friar Kordecki in response to a wish of King Casimir, these memoirs were originally published in Latin in 1658. The analysis and subtitles are by Prof. Plinio Correa de Oliveira…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Count Louis de Baude Frontenac

A governor of New France, born at Paris, 1662; died at Quebec, 28 Nov., 1698.

His father was captain of the royal castle of St-Germain-en-laye; his mother, née Phelypeaux, was the daughter of the king’s secretary of state; Louis XIII was his godfather. By his valour and skill he won the rank of marshall of the king’s camps and armies. He served in Holland, France, Italy and Germany, and also in Candia where Turenne had sent him to command a contingent against the Turks. A brilliant military reputation, therefore, preceeded him to Canada. During his first administration (1672-1682) he built a fort at Cataracouy (now Kingston) to awe the Iroquois and facilitate communications with the West. To explore the course of the Mississippi, previously discovered by Joliet and Marquette, he sent Cavelier de La Salle, who named the country watered by that river Louisiana, in honour of Louis XIV. Although intelligent and magnanimous, brave and unflinching in peril, he was proud, imperious, and ready to sacrifice all to personal animosity. He quarrelled with most of the officials of the colony over petty questions: with his councillors, with the intendant (Duchesneau), with the Governor of Montreal (Perrot), and with Mgr de Laval, whose prohibition of the liquor-traffic with the Indians he judged harmful to commercial interests. The king, after vainly trying to curb his haughtiness, recalled him in 1682…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Louis being crowned King of France at Reims, November 29, 1228.

St. Louis being crowned King of France at Reims, November 29, 1228.

Traditionally, new sacred music was composed for a coronation. The motet…which was sung for the anointing of Louis IX has come down to us. It was called Gaude, felix Francia…. The boy who was to be anointed and crowned was already on a platform built in front of the chancel, surrounded by the great lords of the realm. He declaimed the solemn oath required: to maintain the Church, do justice to his people, keep the peace. The slender figure knelt, then stretched itself prone before the altar, as the chorus took up the Litany of the Saints….

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

November 29 – St. Saturninus

November 25, 2021

St. Saturninus was, says Tillemont, one of the most illustrious martyrs France has given to the Church. We possess only his Acts, which are very old, since they were utilized by St. Gregory of Tours. He was the first bishop of Toulouse, whither he went during the consulate of Decius and Gratus (250). Whether there were already Christians in the town or his preaching made numerous conversions, he soon had a little church. To reach it he had to pass before the capitol where there was a a temple, and according to the Acts, the pagan priests ascribed to his frequent passings the silence of their oracles. One day they seized him and on his unshakeable refusal to sacrifice to the idols they condemned him be tied by the feet to a bull which dragged him about the town until the rope broke…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Radbod, Bishop of Utrecht, Confessor

This holy prelate was, by his father, of noble French extraction; and, by his mother, Radbod, the last king or prince of the Frisons was his great grandfather, whose name was given him by his mother.

The first tincture of learning and piety he received under the tuition of Gunther, bishop of Cologne, his uncle by the mother: his education was completed in the courts of the emperors Charles the Bald, and his son Louis the Stammerer, to which he repaired not to aspire after honors, but to perfect himself in the sciences, which were taught there by the ablest masters…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Bl. Margaret of Savoy

Marchioness of Montferrat, born at Pignerol in 1382; died at Alba, 23 November, 1464.

Blessed Margaret of SavoyShe was the only daughter of Louis of Savoy, Prince of Achaia, and of Bonne, daughter of Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy, and was given in marriage in 1403 to Theodore, Marquis of Montferrat, a descendant of the Greek emperors, the Palæologi, and widower of Jeanne, daughter of the duke of Bar and of Lorraine. Her piety, already great, increased after she had heard the preaching of St. Vincent Ferrer, who spent several months in Montferrat. Therefore, when she was left a widow in 1418, she decided to abandon the world. Leaving the direction of the affairs of the marquisate to Jean-Jacques, the son of her husband by his first marriage, she retired to Alba where she joined the Third Order of St. Dominic…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

November 23 – St. Trudo

November 22, 2021

St. Trudo

(also called TRON, TROND, TRUDON, TRUTJEN, TRUYEN).

Apostle of Hasbein in Brabant; died 698 (or perhaps 693). Feast 23 November.

He was the son of Blessed Adela of the family of the dukes of Austrasia. Devoted from his earliest youth to the service of God, Trudo came to St. Remaclus, Bishop of Liège (Acta SS., I Sept., 678) and was sent by him to Chlordulph, Bishop of Metz. Here he received his education at the Church of St. Stephen, to which he always showed a strong affection and donated his later foundation. After his ordination he returned to his native district, preached the Gospel, and built a church at Sarchinium, on the River Cylindria. It was blessed about 656 by St. Theodard, Bishop of Liège, in honour of Sts. Quintinus and Remigius. Disciples gathered about him and in course of time the abbey arose. The convent for women, established by him at Odeghem near Bruges, later also bore his name (“Gallia Christiana”, Paris, 1887, V, 281)…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Joseph Marchand

Joseph Marchand (August 17, 1803 – November 30, 1835) was a French missionary in Vietnam, and a member of the Paris Foreign Missions Society.
Born August 17, 1803, in Passavant, in the Doubs department of France, in 1833 he joined the Lê Văn Khôi revolt by Lê Văn Khôi, son of the late governor of southern Vietnam Lê Văn Duyệt. Khoi and Marchand vowed to overthrow Emperor Minh Mạng and replace him with My Duong, the son of Minh Mạng’s late elder brother Nguyễn Phúc Cảnh, who were both Catholics. Marchand and Khoi appealed to the Catholics to join in overthrowing Minh Mạng and installing a Catholic emperor. They quickly seized the Citadel of Saigon and the uprising lasted two years…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

(also known as St. Giuseppe Maria Pignatelli)

Born 27 December, 1737, in Saragossa, Spain; died 11 November, 1811.

His family was of Neapolitan descent and noble lineage. After finishing his early studies in the Jesuit College of Saragossa, he entered the Society of Jesus (8 May, 1753) notwithstanding his family’s opposition. On concluding his ecclesiastical studies he was ordained, and taught at Saragossa. In 1766 the Governor of Saragossa was held responsible for the threatened famine, and so enraged was the populace against him that they were about to destroy his palace by fire. Pignatelli’s persuasive power over the people averted the calamity. Despite the letter of thanks sent by Charles III the Jesuits were accused of instigating the above-mentioned riot. Pignatelli’s refutation of the calumny was followed by the decree of expulsion of the Fathers of Saragossa (4 April, 1767)…
Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Blessed Hugh Taylor

English martyr, born at Durham; hanged, drawn, and quartered at York, 25 (not 26) November, 1585. He arrived at Reims on 2 May, 1582, and having been ordained a priest was sent thence on the mission on 27 March, 1585. He was the first to suffer under the Statute 27 Eliz. c. 2. lately passed. On 26 November, Marmaduke Bowes, a married gentleman, was hanged for having harboured him. Bowes is described by Challoner as of Angram Grange near Appleton in Cleveland, but is not mentioned in the will of Christopher Bowes of Angram Grange, proved on 30 Sept., 1568, nor in the 1612 pedigree…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Battle of Montgisard painting by Charles-Philippe Larivière

Battle of Montgisard painting by Charles-Philippe Larivière

The Battle of Montgisard was fought between the Ayyubids and the Kingdom of Jerusalem on November 25, 1177. The 16 year old King Baldwin IV, seriously afflicted by leprosy, led an out-numbered Christian force against the army of Saladin. The Islamic force was routed and their casualties were massive, only a fraction managed to flee to safety.

More than wisdom and courage, what made Baldwin IV a great king was his indomitable faith – a virtue he demonstrated at the famous battle of Montgisard. After the attack on Egypt was cancelled, Philip of Flanders took his army to campaign in the northern territories of the kingdom, where Raymond of Tripoli joined him. The move left Jerusalem in a precarious situation. Very few troops had stayed behind to defend the capital and the king’s condition had worsened…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Catherine of Alexandria

A virgin and martyr whose feast is celebrated in the Latin Church and in the various Oriental churches on 25 November, and who for almost six centuries was the object of a very popular devotion.

Of noble birth and learned in the sciences, when only eighteen years old, Catherine presented herself to the Emperor Maximinus who was violently persecuting the Christians, upbraided him for his cruelty and endeavored to prove how iniquitous was the worship of false gods. Astounded at the young girl’s audacity, but incompetent to vie with her in point of learning the tyrant detained her in his palace and summoned numerous scholars whom he commanded to use all their skill in specious reasoning that thereby Catherine might be led to apostatize…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor, Duke of Lorraine

On the 18th of August, 1765, Francis of Lorraine had a stroke of apoplexy, while sitting at table during the wedding feast. In dying he left to his children, under the title, “Instructions to my Children both for their Spiritual and Temporal Lives,” some admirable counsel, bearing the stamp of lofty wisdom and true Christian spirit; but in which, faithful perhaps to the patriarchal customs of the House of Austria, he spoke as an individual rather than as a sovereign, as head of the family rather than as head of the empire.

The Imperial Family

“’T is to prove to you after my death that I loved you during my lifetime that I leave to you these instructions, as rules by which you may regulate your conduct, and as precepts from which I have ever derived benefit.” He exhorted them above all to remain sincere upholders of the Catholic faith and believers in God, “who alone can give us not only our eternal heritage, which is our real happiness, but our only true satisfaction in this world…. It is an essential point, and one which I know not how to impress upon you strongly enough, never under any circumstances whatsoever to deceive yourselves about what is wrong, or try to think it innocent…. The world where you must pass your life is but transitory; there is nought save eternity that is without end. Let this reflection prevent your fixing your affections upon anything here too strongly; but as God himself has sanctioned amusements, and that we should take delight in all that His bounty has so lavishly provided for the gratification of our senses, it is right for us to enjoy them according to His permission…. We should enjoy the pleasures of this life innocently; for so soon as they lead us into evil, of whatever sort it may be, they cease to be pleasures, and become a source of remorse and chagrin…. We are not put into this world for our pleasure only, and God has granted all these diversions but as a relaxation for the spirit…. When it is necessary to command, do not do so without previous consideration of what you command, and the reasons for and against, and then give the order gently…. charity toward the poor, “which is a good deed in the sight of God, and makes one beloved in this world,” he adds, ⸺“The chief care of a sovereign should be not to burden his subjects in order to sustain a luxury which is not needful to the support and tranquility of these same subjects, nor to the preservation and good of the State…

The Duke of Lorraine and Imperial troops crossing the Rhine before Strasbourg, during the War of the Austrian Succession.

“But I do not mean to say by that, that we should not live conformably to the state to which God has called us, and in which he wishes us to live according to his laws; but the two are easily reconciled…”

He traces for them a veritable rule of life, year by year, week by week, day by day, hour by hour, and finishes with these grave words: ⸺

Emperor Francis I lying in state.

“I recommend you to take two days in every year to prepare for death, as though you were sure that those two were the last days of your life; and thus you will accustom yourself to know what you ought to do under those circumstances, and when your last moment arrives, you will not be surprised, but will know what you have to do…. You will recognize the utility of this by the practice of it, and it will do you an infinity of good without doing you any harm; for you will be doing calmly what perhaps illness or lack of time may prevent your doing.

“I herewith command you,” he concluded, “to read these instructions twice yearly; they come from a father who loves you above everything, and who has thought it necessary to leave you this testimony of his tender affection, which you cannot better reciprocate than by loving one another with the same tenderness he bequeaths to all of you.”

The Life of Marie Antoinette, Volume 1 By Maxime de La Rocheterie, Chapter 1, pg 5-7.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 804

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

B. Total Revolutionary Psychological Warfare: A Result of the Third Revolution’s Apogee and Current Problems

November 18, 2021

Total revolutionary psychological warfare therefore results from a combination of the two contradictory factors previously described: on the one hand, communism’s peak of influence over almost all key points of the great machine that is Western society; on the other, its diminishing ability to persuade and lead the profound levels of Western public opinion. Plinio […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 19 – Teacher, Engineer, Army Officer, Prisoner of War, Royal Tutor, and Priest

November 18, 2021

St. Raphael Kalinowski, O.C.D. (1835-1907) [Also known as Father Raphael of St. Joseph, O.C.D] Father Raphael of Saint Joseph Kalinowski, was born at Vilna, 1st September 1835, and at baptism received the name Joseph. Under the teaching of his father Andrew, at the Institute for Nobles at Vilna, he progressed so well that he received […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 19 – St. Nerses I, Bishop of Armenia, Martyr

November 18, 2021

Nerses I Armenian patriarch, surnamed “the Great”. Died 373. Born of the royal stock, he spent his youth in Caesarea where he married Sanducht, a Mamikonian princess. After the death of his wife, he was appointed chamberlain to King Arshak of Armenia. A few years later, having entered the ecclesiastical state, he was elected catholicos, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 20 – St. Edmund the Martyr

November 18, 2021

St. Edmund the Martyr King of East Anglia, born about 840; died at Hoxne, Suffolk, November 20, 870. The earliest and most reliable accounts represent St. Edmund as descended from the preceding kings of East Anglia, though, according to later legends, he was born at Nuremberg (Germany), son to an otherwise unknown King Alcmund of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 20 – St. Ambrose of Camaldoli

November 18, 2021

St. Ambrose of Camaldoli An Italian theologian and writer, born at Portico, near Florence, 16 September, 1386; died 21 October, 1439. His name was Ambrose Traversari. He entered the Order of the Camaldoli when fourteen and became its General in 1431. He was a great theologian and writer, and knew Greek as well as he […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 20 – Queen Elizabeth II Wedding Anniversary

November 18, 2021
Read the full article →

November 20 – Another strong and mighty angel

November 18, 2021

St. Felix of Valois Born in 1127; died at Cerfroi, 4 November, 1212. He is commemorated 20 November. He was surnamed Valois because, according to some, he was a member of the royal branch of Valois in France, according to others, because he was a native of the province of Valois. At an early age […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 21 – Pope St. Gelasius I

November 18, 2021

Pope St. Gelasius I Died at Rome, 19 Nov., 496. Gelasius, as he himself states in his letter to the Emperor Anastasius (Ep. xii, n. 1), was Romanus natus. The assertion of the “Liber Pontificalis” that he was natione Afer is consequently taken by many to mean that he was of African origin, though Roman […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 21 – St. Albert

November 18, 2021

St. Albert Cardinal, Bishop of Liège, died 1192 or 1193. He was a son of Godfrey III, Count of Louvain, and brother of Henry I, Duke of Lorraine and Brabant, and was chosen Bishop of Liège in 1191 by the suffrages of both people and chapter. The Emperor Henry VI violently intruded his own venal […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 21 – St. Columbanus

November 18, 2021

St. Columbanus Abbot of Luxeuil and Bobbio, born in West Leinster, Ireland, in 543; died at Bobbio, Italy, 21 November, 615. His life was written by Jonas, an Italian monk of the Columban community, at Bobbio, c. 643. This author lived during the abbacy of Attala, Columbanus’s immediate successor, and his informants had been companions […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 21 – Christ the King? Or Christ the President?

November 18, 2021

A heavenly King above all, but a King whose government is already exercised in this world. A King who by right possesses the supreme and full authority. The King makes laws, commands and judges. His sovereignty becomes effective when his subjects recognize his rights, and obey his laws. “Jesus Christ has rights over us all: […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 22 – The Eternal Glory of the Caecilia Family

November 18, 2021

St. Cecilia Virgin and martyr, patroness of church music, died at Rome. This saint, so often glorified in the fine arts and in poetry, is one of the most venerated martyrs of Christian antiquity. The oldest historical account of St. Cecilia is found in the “Martyrologium Hieronymianum”; from this it is evident that her feast […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 16 – Commissioned to preach the Sixth Crusade

November 15, 2021

St. Edmund Rich Archbishop of Canterbury, England, born 20 November, c. 1180, at Abingdon, six miles from Oxford; died 16 November, 1240, at Soissy, France. His early chronology is somewhat uncertain. His parents, Reinald (Reginald) and Mabel Rich, were remarkable for piety. It is said that his mother constantly wore hair-cloth, and attended almost every […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 16 – St. Mechtilde

November 15, 2021

St. Mechtilde (MATILDA VON HACKEBORN-WIPPRA). Benedictine; born in 1240 or 1241 at the ancestral castle of Helfta, near Eisleben, Saxony; died in the monastery of Helfta, 19 November, 1298. She belonged to one of the noblest and most powerful Thuringian families, while here sister was the saintly and illustrious Abbess Gertrude von Hackeborn. Some writers […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 16 – St. Margaret of Scotland: In the Middle Ages, the Marvelous Was Something Achievable

November 15, 2021

Saint Margaret of Scotland Commentaries made by Prof. Plinio Correa de Oliveira … Sovereign and patroness of Scotland, 11th century. Although it is a very good intention to comment on the life of St. Margaret, at times one does not have the slightest biographical data on a saint. For lack of a better biography, I […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 16 – St. Agnes of Assisi

November 15, 2021

St. Agnes of Assisi Younger sister of St. Clare and Abbess of the Poor Ladies, born at Assisi, 1197, or 1198; died 1253. She was the younger daughter of Count Favorino Scifi. Her saintly mother, Blessed Hortulana, belonged to the noble family of the Fiumi, and her cousin Rufino was one of the celebrated “Three […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 17 – St. Hilda

November 15, 2021

St. Hilda Abbess, born 614; died 680. Practically speaking, all our knowledge of St. Hilda is derived from the pages of Bede. She was the daughter of Hereric, the nephew of King Edwin of Northumbria, and she seems like her great-uncle to have become a Christian through the preaching of St. Paulinus about the year […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 17 – Mary Tudor

November 15, 2021

Mary Tudor Queen of England from 1553 to 1558; born 18 February, 1516; died 17 November, 1558. Mary was the daughter and only surviving child of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. Cardinal Wolsey was her godfather, and amongst her most intimate friends in early life were Cardinal Pole and his mother, the Countess of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 17 – The Queen Gave Good Example Caring for the Sick and Suffering

November 15, 2021

St. Elizabeth of Hungary Also called St. Elizabeth of Thuringia, born in Hungary, probably at Pressburg, 1207; died at Marburg, Hesse, 17 November (not 19 November), 1231. She was a daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary (1205-35) and his wife Gertrude, a member of the family of the Counts of Andechs-Meran; Elizabeth’s brother succeeded […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 17 – St. Hugh of Lincoln

November 15, 2021

St. Hugh of Lincoln Born about the year 1135 at the castle of Avalon, near Pontcharra, in Burgundy; died at London, 16 Nov., 1200. His father, William, Lord of Avalon, was sprung from one of the noblest of Burgundian houses; of his mother, Anna, very little is known. After his wife’s death, William retired from […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 17 – Saint Gregory of Tours

November 15, 2021

Saint Gregory of Tours Born in 538 or 539 at Arverni, the modern Clermont-Ferrand; died at Tours, 17 Nov., in 593 or 594. He was descended from a distinguished Gallo-Roman family, and was closely related to the most illustrious houses of Gaul. He was originally called Georgius Florentius, but in memory of his maternal great-grandfather, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 18 – Sincere, intense, generous, austere, yet affectionate

November 15, 2021

St. Philippine-Rose Duchesne Founder in America of the first houses of the society of the Sacred Heart, born at Grenoble, France, 29 August, 1769; died at St. Charles, Missouri, 18 November, 1852. She was the daughter of Pierr-Francois Duchesne, an eminent lawyer. Her mother was a Périer, ancestor of Casimir Périer, President of France in […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 18 – He Started the Cluniac Reform

November 15, 2021

St. Odo of Cluny Odo was born in 879 in Maine, and was the son of a pious and surprisingly learned layman, Abbo. Though vowed by his father to St. Martin in babyhood, he was given a military training and became a page at the court of Duke William. But the exercises of war and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

El Cid Is Made a Knight

November 11, 2021

At this time also Rodrigo was made a knight, on account of the great deeds he had done at this siege and in former battles. This ceremony was performed in the great Mosque of Coimbra, which having been a Mahometan temple was now dedicated as a Christian church. In the presence of a great company […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Two Great Goals of Revolutionary Psychological Warfare

November 11, 2021

[previous] A. The Two Great Goals of Revolutionary Psychological Warfare Given the Third Revolution’s present difficulties in carrying out ideological recruitment, the most useful of its activities is aimed not at its friends and sympathizers, but at the neutrals and its adversaries: a. to deceive and slowly put the neutrals to sleep; b. to divide […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 12 – Co-regent

November 11, 2021

Saint Cunibert (also Cunipert, or Kunibert) (c. 600 – 12 November c. 663) was the ninth Bishop of Cologne from 627 to his death. Contemporary sources only mention him between 627 and 643. Cunibert (also spelled ‘Honoberht’) was born somewhere along the Moselle to a family of the local Ripuarian Frankish aristocracy. He entered the church […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 12 – Fearless and Bold

November 11, 2021

St. Lebwin (LEBUINUS or LIAFWIN). Apostle of the Frisians and patron of Deventer, born in England of Anglo-Saxon parents at an unknown date; died at Deventer, Holland, about 770. Educated in a monastery and fired by the example of St. Boniface, St. Willibrord, and other great English missionaries, Lebwin resolved to dovote his life to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 12 – Kidnapped, sold as a slave, ransomed by a bishop, and confidante of the emperor

November 11, 2021

St. Nilus (Neilos) Nilus the elder, of Sinai (died circa 430), was one of the many disciples and fervent defenders of St. John Chrysostom. We know him first as a layman, married, with two sons. At this time he was an officer at the Court of Constantinople, and is said to have been one of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 12 – Four years in Stalin’s concentration camp

November 11, 2021

Blessed Hryhorij Lakota Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church auxiliary bishop who suffered religious persecution and was martyred by the Soviet Government. Hryhorij Lakota was born 31 January 1893 in Holodivka, Lviv Oblast. He was appointed auxiliary bishop of Przemyśl on 16 May 1926. On 9 June 1946, he was arrested and sentenced to ten years imprisonment, as […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 12 – Noble Ruthenian Stock

November 11, 2021

St. Josaphat Kuncevyc Martyr, born in the little town of Volodymyr in Lithuania (Volyn) in 1580 or — according to some writers — 1584; died at Vitebsk, Russia, 12 November, 1623. The saint’s birth occurred in a gloomy period for the Ruthenian Church. Even as early as the beginning of the sixteenth century the Florentine […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 13 – Pure and noble, he received Holy Communion from the hands of angels

November 11, 2021

St. Stanislas Kostka Born at Rostkovo near Prasnysz, Poland, about 28 October, 1550; died at Rome during the night of 14-15 August, 1568. He entered the Society of Jesus at Rome, 28 October, 1567, and is said to have foretold his death a few days before it occurred. His father, John Kostka, was a senator […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 13 – Grand Master of the Order of Christ

November 11, 2021

Prince Henry the Navigator Born 4 March, 1394; died 13 November, 1460; he was the fourth son of John I, King of Portugal, by Queen Philippa, a daughter of John of Gaunt. In 1415 he commanded the expedition which captured Ceuta, Portugal’s first oversea conquest, and there won his knightly spurs. Three years later he […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 13 – He calmed the fear of the end of the world

November 11, 2021

St. Abbon (or Abbo), born near Orléans c. 945; died at Fleury, 13 November, 1004, a monk of the Benedictine monastery of Fleury sur Loire (Fleuret), conspicuous both for learning and sanctity, and one of the great lights of the Church in the stormy times of Hugh Capet of France and of the three Ottos […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 13 – One of the Great Popes of the Middle Ages

November 11, 2021

Pope St. Nicholas I Born at Rome, date unknown; died 13 November, 867; one of the great popes of the Middle Ages, who exerted decisive influence upon the historical development of the papacy and its position among the Christian nations of Western Europe. He was of a distinguished family, being the son of the Defensor […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 13 – Patroness of missionaries

November 11, 2021

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, M.S.C. Also called Mother Cabrini, she founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart, a religious institute which was a major support to the Italian immigrants to the United States. She was the first citizen of the United States to be canonized by the Catholic Church. She was born in Sant’Angelo […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 14 – Saint Erconwald

November 11, 2021

Saint Erconwald Bishop of London, died. about 690. He belonged to the princely family of the East Anglian Offa, and devoted a considerable portion of his patrimony to founding two monasteries, one for monks at Chertsey, and the other for nuns at Barking in Essex. Over the latter he placed his sister, St. Ethelburga, as […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 14 – St. Lawrence O’Toole

November 11, 2021

St. Lawrence O’Toole (Lorcan ua Tuathail; also spelled Laurence O’Toole) Confessor, born about 1128, in the present County Kildare; died 14 November, 1180, at Eu in Normandy; canonized in 1225 by Honorius III. His father was chief of Hy Murray, and his mother one of the Clan O’Byrne. At the age of ten he was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 15 – Martyred for God (and Money…)

November 11, 2021

Bl. Richard Whiting Last Abbot of Glastonbury and martyr, parentage and date of birth unknown, executed 15 Nov., 1539; was probably educated in the claustral school at Glastonbury, whence he proceeded to Cambridge, graduating as M.A. in 1483 and D.D. in 1505. If, as is probable, he was already a monk when he went to […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 15 – St. Desiderius of Cahors

November 11, 2021

St. Desiderius of Cahors Bishop, born at Obrege (perhaps Antobroges, name of a Gaulish tribe), on the frontier of the Provincia Narbonnensis, of a noble Frankish family from Aquitaine, which possessed large estates in the territory of Albi; died 15 Nov., 655—though Krusch has called this date in question… Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

November 15 – Universal Doctor

November 11, 2021

St. Albert the Great Known as Albert the Great; scientist, philosopher, and theologian, born c. 1206; died at Cologne, 15 November 1280. He is called “the Great”, and “Doctor Universalis” (Universal Doctor), in recognition of his extraordinary genius and extensive knowledge, for he was proficient in every branch of learning cultivated in his day, and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →