St. Francis of Assisi

Founder of the Franciscan Order, born at Assisi in Umbria, in 1181 or 1182 — the exact year is uncertain; died there, 3 October, 1226.

His father, Pietro Bernardone, was a wealthy Assisian cloth merchant. Of his mother, Pica, little is known, but she is said to have belonged to a noble family of Provence. Francis was one of several children. The legend that he was born in a stable dates from the fifteenth century only, and appears to have originated in the desire of certain writers to make his life resemble that of Christ. At baptism the saint received the name of Giovanni, which his father afterwards altered to Francesco, through fondness it would seem for France, whither business had led him at the time of his son’s birth. In any case, since the child was renamed in infancy, the change can hardly have had anything to do with his aptitude for learning French, as some have thought…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Petronius

Bishop of Bologna, date of birth unknown; died before 450. The only certain historical information we possess concerning him is derived from a letter written by Bishop Eucherius of Lyons (died 450-5) to Valerianus (in P. L., L, 711 sqq.) and from Gennadius’ “De viris illustribus”, XLI (ed. Czapla, Münster, 1898, p. 94). Eucherius writes that the holy Bishop Petronius was then renowned in Italy for his virtues. From Gennadius we receive more detailed information: Petronius belonged to a noble family whose members occupied high positions at the imperial Court at Milan and in the provincial administrations at the end of the fourth and the beginning of the fifth centuries. His father (also named Petronius) was probably prœfectus prœtorio, since a Petronius filled this office in Gaul in 402-8. Eucherius seems to suggest (P. L., L, 719) that the future bishop also held an important secular position…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Bl. Raymond of Capua

Called “the second founder of the Dominicans”, Raymond della Vigna was born in Capua of a prominent family in the kingdom of Naples. He entered the Dominican Order when attending the university in Bologna and went on to fill several posts, including prior in Rome and lector in Florence and Siena…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Francis X. Seelos

Bl. Fr. SeelosBorn at Füssen, Bavaria, 11 January, 1819; died at New Orleans, La., 4 Oct., 1867. When a child, asked by his mother what he intended to be, he pointed to the picture of his patron, St. Francis Xavier, and said: “I’m going to be another St. Francis.” He pursued his studies in Augsburg and Munich, and entered the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, offering himself for the American Mission; he arrived in America on 17 April, 1843. That following year, 16 May, 1844, he made his religious profession at the Redemptorist novitiate, Baltimore, and seven months later he was ordained by Archbishop Eccleston of Baltimore. He was assigned to St. James, Baltimore. In May 1845, he was sent to Pittsburg, where he had as superior Ven. John Neumann. In 1851 Father Seelos was appointed superior of the Pittsburg community, where he laboured untiringly for nine years. His confessional was constantly besieged by crowds of people of every description and class. It was said by many that he could read their very souls. From Pittsburg, he was transferred to St. Alphonsus’s, Baltimore, where he fell dangerously ill. On his recovery he was appointed prefect (spiritual director) of the professed students, and he succeeded in winning the love an esteem of all who were privleged to be under his spiritual guidance. In 1860 his name was proposed for the vacant Holy See of Pittsburg, but humbly refused the honour. The year 1862 found him again at mission work. In 1866 he was summoned to Detroit, and in September of the same year to New Orleans, Louisiana.

[Nobility.org note: he was beatified April 9, 2000.]

ZIMMER, Leben des P.F.Z. Seelos (New York, 1887); BECK, Die Redemptorists in Ammapolis (Ilchester, 1904); BENEDETTI, Album Servorum Dei, C.SS.R. (Rome, 1903); SHEA, History of the Catholic Church in the United States, I (New york, 1908).

Cornelius J. Warren (cfr. Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

October 5 – St. Galla

October 3, 2022

The Old Church dedicated to St. GallaA Roman widow of the sixth century; feast, 5 October. According to St. Gregory the Great (Dial. IV, ch. xiii) she was the daughter of the younger Symmachus, a learned and virtuous patrician of Rome, whom Theodoric had unjustly condemned to death (525). Becoming a widow before the end of the first year of her married life, she, still very young, founded a convent and hospital near St. Peter’s, there spent the remainder of her days in austerities and works of mercy, and ended her life with an edifying death. The letter of St. Fulgentius of Ruspe, “De statu viduarum”, is supposed to have been addressed to her. Her church in Rome, near the Piazza Montanara, once held a picture of Our Lady, which according to tradition represents a vision vouchsafed to St. Galla. It is considered miraculous and was carried in recession in times of pestilence. It is now over the high altar of Santa Maria in Campitelli.

FRANCIS MERSHMAN (Catholic Encyclopedia)

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Bruno

Confessor, ecclesiastical writer, and founder of the Carthusian Order. He was born at Cologne about the year 1030; died 6 October, 1101. He is usually represented with a death’s head in his hands, a book and a cross, or crowned with seven stars; or with a roll bearing the device O Bonitas. His feast is kept on the 6th of October…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Msgr. Henri Delassus (1836-1921), ordained a priest in 1862, served in parishes in Valenciennes (Saint-Géry) and Lille (Sainte-Catherine and Sainte-Marie-Madeleine). He was names chaplain of the basilica Notre-Dame-de-la-Treille (Lille) in 1874, an honorary canon in 1882, and domestic prelate in 1904. In 1911 he was promoted to protonotary apostolic. In 1914 he became canon of the recently erected diocese of Lille and dean of its cathedral chapter…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

From the bosom of a hospital consecrated to the service of pilgrims and the poor, issued heroes armed against the infidels—the humanity and the bravery of the knights of St. John were equally conspicuous. Whilst some grew old in the offices of hospitality, others went forth to combat with the enemies of the faith. After the example of these pious knights, several men of gentle birth met near the place where the temple of Solomon had stood, and took an oath to protect and defend the pilgrims who repaired to Jerusalem. Their union gave birth to the order of the Templars, which, from its origin, was approved by a council, and owed its statutes to St. Bernard.

Godfrey of Bouillon, with the Order of the Holy Sepulchre emblem.

These two orders were governed by the same principle that had given birth to the crusade, the union of the military spirit and the religious spirit. Retired from the world, they had no other country but Jerusalem, no other family but that of Jesus Christ. Wealth, evils, and dangers were all in common amongst them; one will, one spirit, directed all their actions and all their thoughts; all were united in one house, which appeared to be inhabited but by one man. They lived in great austerity, and the severer their discipline became, the stronger appeared the bonds by which it enchained their hearts and their wills. Arms formed their only decoration; precious ornaments were never seen in their houses or churches; but lances, bucklers, swords, and standards taken from the infidels abounded. At the cry of battle, says St. Bernard, they armed themselves with faith within and with steel without; they feared neither the number nor the fury of the barbarians, they were proud to conquer, happy to die for Jesus Christ, and believed that every victory came from God.

Foulques de Villaret, 25th Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller.

Religion had sanctified the perils and the violences of war. Every monastery of Palestine was a fortress, in which the din of arms was mingled with the voice of prayer. Humble cenobites sought glory in fight; the canons, instituted by Godfrey to pray near the holy tomb, after the example of the Hospitallers and the Templars, had clothed themselves with the casque and the cuirass, and, under the name of the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre, distinguished themselves amongst the soldiers of Christ.

Joseph François Michaud, History of the Crusades, trans. W. Robson (New York: Redfied, 1853), 1:306–308.

Short Stories on Honor, Chivalry, and the World of Nobility—no. 848

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

This egalitarian movement not only wants equality in religion, in politics, and in the economy, but also total egalitarianism in all things—not only equality among men, but also an egalitarian vision of the very universe itself. In this way man will one day see himself in a universe where all things are equal, uniform, standardized, and reduced to the same size and dimension, to the same nature and proportion. This is the essence of the Egalitarian Revolution.

Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira, quoted in Egalitarianism: The Metaphysical Value and Religion of Our Days; Social Leveling . . . Total Leveling, edited by Tradition, Family Property Association (Glasgow: Tradition, Family, Property Association, 2011), xxiii.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Jerome, Father and Doctor of the Church

Born at Stridon, a town on the confines of Dalmatia and Pannonia, about the year 340-2; died at Bethlehem, 30 September, 420.

He had a brother much younger than himself, whose name was Paulinian. His father, called Eusebius, was descended from a good family, and had a competent estate; but, being persuaded that a good education is the most precious inheritance that a parent can leave to his children, took great care to have his son instructed in piety, and in the first principles of literature at home, and afterwards sent him to Rome, probably about 360, where he was baptized. St. Jerome had there, for tutor, the famous pagan grammarian Donatus, (well known for his commentaries on Virgil and Terence,) also Victorinus the rhetorician, who by a decree of the senate was honored with a statue in Trajan’s square…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

ST. THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX

Excerpts from THE STORY OF A SOUL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ST. THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX

SOEUR THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX, THE LITTLE FLOWER OF JESUS

______________________________

PROLOGUE: THE PARENTAGE & BIRTH OF MARIE FRANÇOISE THÉRÈSE MARTIN and
CHAPTER ONE – EARLIEST MEMORIES

CHAPTER II: A CATHOLIC HOUSEHOLD and
CHAPTER III: PAULINE ENTERS THE CARMEL

CHAPTER IV: FIRST COMMUNION AND CONFIRMATION and
CHAPTER V: VOCATION OF THÉRÈSE

_______________

CHAPTER VI

A PILGRIMAGE TO ROME

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Alarm was ended on the fourth day, seeing that the fever and other ills left D. John. But the next day, which was a Saturday, he suddenly grew worse, and while the other invalids went on getting better and became convalescent, he showed other symptoms of a strange illness, palpitations which made him get up in bed, tremblings of the hands, arms, tongue and eyes, and red spots showed themselves, others livid and almost blue, with black, rough heads…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

That every individual soul has a guardian angel has never been defined by the Church, and is, consequently, not an article of faith; but it is the “mind of the Church”, as St. Jerome expressed it: “how great the dignity of the soul, since each one has from his birth an angel commissioned to guard it.” (Comm. in Matt., xviii, lib. II)…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Leodegar

(also Leger or Leodegarius)

Bishop of Autun, born about 615; died a martyr in 678, at Sarcing, Somme.

His mother was called Sigrada, and his father Bobilo. His parents being of high rank, his early childhood was passed at the court of Clotaire II.

He went later to Poitiers, to study under the guidance of his uncle, the bishop of that town. Having given proof of his learning and virtue, and feeling a liking for the priestly life, his uncle ordained him deacon, and associated him with himself in the government of the diocese. Shortly afterwards he became a priest and with the bishop’s approval withdrew to the monastery of St. Maxentius in 650. He was soon elected abbot and signalized himself by reforming the community and introducing the Rule of St. Benedict…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

(December 13, 1908 – October 3, 1995)

Brazilian intellectual and Catholic activist.

Corrêa de Oliveira was born in São Paulo to Lucilia Corrêa de Oliveira, a devout Roman Catholic, and educated by Jesuits. In 1928 he joined the Marian Congregations of São Paulo and soon became a leader of that organization. In 1933 he helped organize the Catholic Electoral League and was elected to the nation’s Constitutional Convention by the “Catholic bloc”, and at 24 was the youngest congressman in Brazil’s history. His view of the Church has been described as ultramontanist and his political ideology anti-Communist…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Many of the early pioneers faced the hardships of this country where wars, famine and disease were the norm. Leaving everything behind, heroic souls came not only to save the souls of Indian nations, but also to minister to these frontier families. One such person was St. Mother Théodore Guérin, who became the eighth American Saint and the first Saint from the State of Indiana on October 15, 2006…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Gérard, Abbot of Brogne

Born at Staves in the county of Namur, towards the end of the ninth century; died at Brogne or St-Gérard, 3 Oct. 959.

The son of Stance, of the family of dukes of Lower Austrasia, and of Plectrude, sister of Stephen, Bishop of Liège, the young Gérard, like most men of his rank, followed at first the career of arms. His piety, however, was admirable amid the distractions of camp. He transformed into a large church a modest chapel situated on the estate of Brogne which belonged to his family…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

St. Thomas of Hereford

(THOMAS DE CANTELUPE).

Born at Hambledon, Buckinghamshire, England, about 1218; died at Orvieto, Italy, 25 August, 1282.

He was the son of William de Cantelupe and Millicent de Gournay, and thus a member of an illustrious and influential family. He was educated under the care of his uncle, Walter de Cantelupe, Bishop of Worcester, first at Oxford then at Paris. During his studies he attended the Council of Lyons in 1245, when he became a papal chaplain. Returning to Oxford, he taught canon law, and in 1262 was elected chancellor of the university…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

According to the Royal Household:

Not seen on the streets of London since the funeral of Sir Winston Churchill in 1965, the State Gun Carriage was pulled by 98 Royal Navy sailors, with a further 40 marching behind acting as brakes. The King and Members of the Royal Family again followed The Queen’s Coffin in Procession. The Procession` include detachments from the Armed Forces of the Commonwealth, as well as detachments of the British Armed Forces who held a special relationship with The Queen.

The Queen was buried together with The Duke of Edinburgh…

To read the entire article from the Royal Household, please click here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

Fr. Peter Skarga

Theologian and missionary, born at Grojec, 1536; died at Cracow, 27 Sept., 1612.

He began his education in his native town in 1552; he went to study in Cracow and afterwards in Warsaw. In 1557 he was in Vienna as tutor to the young Castellan, Teczynski; returning thence in 1564, he received Holy orders, and later was nominated canon of Lemberg Cathedral. Here he began to preach his famous sermons, and to convert Protestants…

Read more here.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

{ 0 comments }

September 27 – St. Vincent de Paul had special charity to the impoverished nobility

September 26, 2022

St. Vincent de Paul founded a special organization for the relief of the nobility of Lorraine who had sought refuge in Paris during the Thirty Years War. In that period of the war known as the French period Lorraine, Trois-Evechés, Franche-Comté, and Champagne underwent for nearly a quarter of a century all the horrors and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 27 – These exemplary nobles personified virtue

September 26, 2022

Saint Elzéar of Sabran, Count of Arian, and Saint Delphina of Glandenes St. Elzear (also spelled Eleazarus) was descended of the ancient and illustrious family of Sabran, in Provence; his father, Hermengaud of Sabran, was created count of Arian (Ariano), in the kingdom of Naples; his mother was Lauduna of Albes, a family no less […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 28 – Good King Wenceslaus

September 26, 2022

(Also Vaclav, Vaceslav.) Duke, martyr, and patron of Bohemia, born probably 903; died at Alt-Bunzlau, 28 September, 935. His parents were Duke Wratislaw, a Christian, and Dragomir, a heathen. He received a good Christian education from his grandmother (St. Ludmilla) and at Budweis. After the death of Wratislaw, Dragomir, acting as regent, opposed Christianity, and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 28 – Franciscan money lender

September 26, 2022

Bl. Bernardine of Feltre Friar Minor and missionary, born at Feltre, Italy, in 1439 and died at Pavia, 28 September, 1494. He belonged to the noble family of Tomitano and was the eldest of nine children. In 1456 St. James of the Marches preached the Lenten course at Padua, and inspired to enter the Franciscan […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

October 1 – The Hon. George Spencer

September 26, 2022

In religion, Ignatius of St. Paul). Passionist, born at the Admiralty, London, 21 Dec., 1799; died at Carstairs, Scotland, 1 Oct., 1864. He was the youngest son of the second Earl Spencer and Lavinia, daughter of Sir Charles Bingham. From Eton he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, received Anglican orders, 13 June, 1824, and became […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 29 – The Angelic Inspiration of Chivalry

September 26, 2022

Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael _____________________ Saint Michael the Archangel: “Who is like God?” In Hebraic, mîkâ’êl, means “Who is like God?” The Scriptures refer to the Archangel Saint Michael in four different passages: two of them, in Daniel’s prophesy (chap. 10, 13 and 21; and chap. 12, 1); one in Saint Jude Thaddeus (single […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 29 – Military Orders of St. Michael

September 26, 2022

Military Orders of St. Michael (1) A Bavarian Order, founded in 1721 by Elector Joseph Clemens of Cologne, Duke of Bavaria, and confirmed by Maximilian Joseph, King of Bavaria, 11 September 1808. Pius VII, 5 Feb. 1802 granted to priests decorated with this order all the privileges of domestic prelates. Under Louis I it was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 29 – In battle or in prison, he never missed Mass

September 26, 2022

Blessed Charles of Blois (1320- September 29, 1364) Charles is the son of Guy I of Blois-Châtillon, count of Blois, by Margaret of Valois, a sister of king Philip VI of France. Early in life, he felt a call to be a Franciscan friar, but political duty kept him in secular life. Following his marriage […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Ursuline Nuns Sacrifice Themselves to Succor the Plague-Stricken Quebec Indians

September 22, 2022

The nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu soon after took up their abode at Sillery, whence they removed to a house built for them at Quebec by their foundress, the Duchesse d’Aiguillon. The Ursulines, in the absence of better quarters, were lodged at first in a small wooden tenement under the rock of Quebec, at the brink […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

The Admiration of the English Golden Boy

September 22, 2022

by Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira This is a scene from an Italian magazine showing the queen of England riding in a carriage, dressed in the insignias of the Order of the Garter. The carriage is being pulled by horses and she is in grand ceremonial dress. . . . There’s a hat with a feather […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 23 – He ensured the immunity of non-combatants in warfare

September 22, 2022

St. Adamnan of Ireland, Abbot He was the eighth in descent from the great Nial, king of Ireland, and from Conal the Great, ancestor of St. Columbkille. His parents were eminent for their rank and virtue. He was born in the year 626, at Rathboth, (1) now called Raphoe, in the county of Donegal, and […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 24 – Founding Father

September 22, 2022

Fr. François Vaillant de Gueslis Jesuit missionary, born at Orleans, 20 July, 1646; died at Moulins, 24 Sept., 1718. He entered the Society of Jesus, 10 Nov., 1665; came to Canada in 1670; and was ordained priest at Quebec, 1 Dec., 1675. He first evangelized the Mohawks (1679-84). In the beginning of 1688 he was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 24 – “There is nothing so sublime as the papacy nor so exalted as the imperial throne”

September 22, 2022

Pope Innocent II (Gregorio Papereschi) Elected 14 Feb., 1130; died 24 Sept., 1143. He was a native of Rome and belonged to the ancient family of the Guidoni. His father’s name is given as John. The youthful Gregory became canon of the Lateran and later Abbot of Sts. Nicholas and Primitivus. He was made Cardinal-Deacon […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 25 – Princely Umpire in a deadly sport

September 22, 2022

St. Albert of Jerusalem Patriarch of Jerusalem, one of the conspicuous ecclesiastics in the troubles between the Holy See and Federick Barbarossa; date of birth uncertain; died 14 September, 1215. He was in fact asked by both Pope and Emperor to act as umpire in their dispute and, as a reward, was made Prince of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 25 – St. Aunarius

September 22, 2022

St. Aunarius (Or Aunacharius). Bishop of Auxerre in France, born 573, died 603. Being of noble birth, he was brought up in the royal court, but evinced a desire to enter the clerical state, was ordained priest by St. Syagrius of Autum, and eventually was made Bishop of Auxerre. His administration is noted for certain […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 25 – Did he compose the Salve Regina prayer?

September 22, 2022

Bl. Hermann Contractus (Herimanus Augiensis, Hermann von Reichenau). Chronicler, mathematician, and poet; born 18 February, 1013, at Altshausen (Swabia); died on the island of Reichenau, Lake Constance, 21 September, 1054. He was the son of Count Wolverad II von Altshausen. Being a cripple from birth (hence the surname Contractus) he was powerless to move without […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 26 – Fr. Frederick William Faber

September 22, 2022

Fr. Frederick William Faber Oratorian and devotional writer, b. 28 June, 1814, at Calverley, Yorkshire, England; d. in London, 26 Sept., 1863. After five years at Harrow School he matriculated at Balliol in 1832, became a scholar at University College in 1834, and a fellow of that College in 1837. Of Huguenot descent Faber was […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Video Highlights: Queen Elizabeth’s funeral procession and burial

September 19, 2022

Tens of thousands of mourners lined the ceremonial procession route from Westminister as the Queen’s coffin was carried to Wellington Arch. Members of the Royal Family watched solemnly as her casket was lifted from the State Gun Carriage and placed on the State Hearse where it departed for Windsor. Queen reaches her final resting place […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Viewing Queen Elizabeth II: Longest Queue in History

September 19, 2022

According to Deadline: It has reportedly become the longest queue in history, as tens of thousands of people continue to line up to pay their respects to the late Queen Elizabeth II, lying in state in London’s Westminster Hall. Images visible from space reveal the long line of people shuffling along the south bank of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Final preparations made ahead of the Queen’s funeral

September 19, 2022

According to STV: Pipe Major Paul Burns of The Royal Regiment of Scotland will play one last time for the Queen at her funeral service on Monday…at the request of Her late Majesty. Sunday will mark the fourth and final day of the Queen’s coffin lying in state at Westminster Hall in London. A one-minute […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 20 – Starved to death for the faith

September 19, 2022

Bl. Thomas Johnson Carthusian martyr, died in Newgate gaol, London, 20 September, 1537. On 18 May, 1537, the twenty choir monks and eighteen brothers remaining in the London Charterhouse were required to take the Oath of Supremacy. Of these choir monks Thomas Johnson, Richard Bere, Thomas Green (priests), and John Davy (deacon) refused; and of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 20 – “Threats do not terrify me”

September 19, 2022

Pope St. Agapetus I (Also AGAPITUS.) Reigned 535-536. Date of birth uncertain; died 22 April, 536. He was the son of Gordianus, a Roman priest who had been slain during the riots in the days of Pope Symmachus. His first official act was to burn in the presence of the assembled clergy the anathema which […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 20 – Court preacher to Charles V

September 19, 2022

Saint Alonso de Orozco Mena Alphonsus de Orozco was born in Oropesa, Province of Toledo, Spain, on the 17th of October 1500, where his father was governor of the local castle. He began his studies in the nearby Talavera de la Reina and for three years he was a choir boy in the Cathedral of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 20 – Bl. Margaret Colona

September 19, 2022

Bl. Margaret Colona Poor Clare, born in Rome, date uncertain; died there, 20 September, 1284. Her parents died in Rome when she was still a young girl, and she was left to the care of her two brothers, the youngest of whom was raised to the cardinalate by Nicholas III in 1278. Having resolutely refused […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 21 – Pope Conon

September 19, 2022

Pope Conon Date of birth unknown; died, after a long illness, 21 September, 687. The son, seemingly, of an officer in the Thracesian troop, he was educated in Sicily and ordained priest at Rome. His age, venerable appearance, and simple character caused the clergy and soldiery of Rome, who were in disagreement, to put aside […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 21 – Victim of intrigue

September 19, 2022

Gabriel Malagrida A Jesuit missionary to Brazil, born 18 September or 6 December, 1689, at Menaggio, in Italy; died 21 September, 1761, at Lisbon. He entered the Jesuit order at Genoa in 1711. He set out from Lisbon in 1721 and arrived on the Island of Maranhào towards the end of the same year. Thence […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 22 – He especially sought out impoverished nobles who shrank from asking alms

September 19, 2022

St. Thomas of Villanova Educator, philanthropist, born at Fuentellana, Spain, 1488; died at Valencia, 8 September, 1555. Son of Aloazo Tomas Garcia and Lucia Martínez Castellanos, the saint was brought up in the practices of religion and charity. Every Friday his father was wont to give in alms all the meal he earned at the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 22 – Saint Emmeram

September 19, 2022

Saint Emmeram Bishop of Poitiers and missionary to Bavaria, born at Poitiers in the first half of the seventh century; martyred at Ascheim (Bavaria) towards the end of the same century. Of a noble family of Aquitaine, he received a good education and was ordained priest. According to some authors Emmeram occupied the See of […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Queen’s coffin carried from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Hall

September 15, 2022

According to The Independent: Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin has been ceremonially brought to Westminster Hall from Buckingham Palace in a procession through London as well-wishers lined the streets of the city. Prince William and Price Harry walked alongside their father, King Charles III, as they walked to the Palace of Westminster, where Her late Majesty […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Funeral of Queen Elizabeth: Video Highlights

September 15, 2022

Some video highlights of the funeral of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II: King Charles III leads procession behind Queen’s coffin The Queen’s journey from Balmoral to Edinburgh Queen Elizabeth II: Cortege met by cheers at Buckingham Palace  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Pope Francis and Queen Elizabeth: Parallel Reigns

September 15, 2022

by Antoine Bellion September 14, 2022 Pope Francis and Elizabeth belong more or less to the same generation. The pope is eighty-five years old. The queen has just passed away at the venerable age of ninety-six. Both were marked by twentieth-century tragedies: the Second World War for Princess Elizabeth and the dictatorship for José-Mario Bergoglio. […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

More French Nobles Sacrifice Themselves For Quebec’s Christianization

September 15, 2022

At the end of August, 1643, a vessel arrived at Villemarie with a reinforcement commanded by Louis d’Ailleboust de Coulonges, a pious gentleman of Champagne, and one of the Associates of Montreal. Some years before, he had asked in wedlock the hand of Barbe de Boulogne; but the young lady had, when a child, in […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

Family Lineages: Behold What Historians Fail to Emphasise

September 15, 2022

[previous] We were facing one of the primordial events in the history of mankind. When these semi-civilised tribes were pushed toward the hills and behind the swamps, a series of family lineages was born. This is a fact that historians fail to emphasise sufficiently. A lineage is something very different from a family. What is […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 16 – The pope who exacted tribute from the Mohammedan ruler of Tunis

September 15, 2022

Pope Blessed Victor III Born in 1026 or 1027 of a non-regnant branch of the Lombard dukes of Benevento; died in Rome, 16 Sept., 1087. Being an only son his desire to embrace the monastic state was strenuously opposed by both his parents. After his father’s death in battle with the Normans, 1047, he fled […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 16 – St. Cyprian of Carthage

September 15, 2022

St. Cyprian of Carthage (Thaschus Cæcilius Cyprianus). Bishop and martyr. Of the date of the saint’s birth and of his early life nothing is known. At the time of his conversion to Christianity he had, perhaps, passed middle life. He was famous as an orator and pleader, had considerable wealth, and held, no doubt, a […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 16 – Wilton Abbey and its patroness St. Edith

September 15, 2022

A Benedictine convent in Wiltshire, England, three miles from Salisbury. A first foundation was made as a college of secular priests by Earl Wulstan of Wiltshire, about 773, but was after his death (800) changed into a convent for 12 nuns by his widow, St. Alburga, sister of King Egbert. Owing to the consent given […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Stigmata of St. Francis of Assisi

September 15, 2022

Early in August, 1224, Francis retired with three companions to “that rugged rock ‘twixt Tiber and Arno”, as Dante called La Verna, there to keep a forty days fast in preparation for Michaelmas. During this retreat the sufferings of Christ became more than ever the burden of his meditations; into few souls, perhaps, had the […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – St. Peter of Arbues

September 15, 2022

(Correctly, PETER ARBUES). Born in 1441 (or 1442); died 17 Sept., 1485. His father, a nobleman, was Antonio Arbues, and his mother’s name was Sancia Ruiz. He studied philosophy, probably at Huesca, but later went to Bologna, where in the Spanish college of St. Clement he was regarded as a model of learning and piety, […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Noble calm in all controversy, even when correcting the pope

September 15, 2022

St. Robert Francis Romulus Bellarmine (Also, “Bellarmino”). A distinguished Jesuit theologian, writer, and cardinal, born at Montepulciano, 4 October, 1542; died 17 September, 1621. His father was Vincenzo Bellarmino, his mother Cinthia Cervini, sister of Cardinal Marcello Cervini, afterwards Pope Marcellus II. He was brought up at the newly founded Jesuit college in his native […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →

September 17 – Greatly venerated even during her life

September 15, 2022

St. Hildegard Born at Böckelheim on the Nahe, 1098; died on the Rupertsberg near Bingen, 1179; feast 17 September. The family name is unknown of this great seeress and prophetess, called the Sibyl of the Rhine. The early biographers give the first names of her parents as Hildebert and Mechtildis (or Mathilda), speak of their […]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Read the full article →